A blog from Special Collections and University Archives


Posted: October 29, 2013
The Seahawk, October 18, 1978Thirty-five years ago, in October of 1978, the English Club at the University of North Carolina Wilmington sold raffle tickets for $.50 each—which would be less than $2 today, according to the US Department of Labor. The raffle tickets could be purchased from club members or from the secretary of the English Department between the 11th and the 26th of October. The prize to be given to the winner of the raffle was a keg of beer, which the club called “Witches Brew.” Betty Salyer and Bobbi Padgett, two UNCW students and English Club members, were said to have travelled to the place where “witches, goblins, skeletons, and evil spirits” meet to concoct their evil brew. The Seahawk writer assured their readers that all the “members of the English Cub must warn prospective winners of the evil spell that accompanie[d] this ‘evil Fluid.’” The winner was chosen on October 27, 1978.
 
The Seahawk, October 11, 1978
 
 
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Posted: October 24, 2013

October 15, 2013 in Randall LibraryOn October 24, 1993, a plaque was dedicated in Randall Library to commemorate and honor the members of the Order of Isaac Bear, an honorary organization of the University of North Carolina Wilmington. Former Chancellor William H. Wagoner founded the organization as a way to recognize members of the UNCW faculty. These members of the faculty had taught in the Isaac Bear building on Market Isaac Bear PortraitStreet, the original location of Wilmington College later UNCW, and were still employed by UNCW in 1987. The original building, the Bear building on the current campus, and the Order of Isaac Bear were all named in honor of Isaac Bear, the brother of a local businessman.

The plaque reads: "Founded in 1988, the Order recognizes those who have demonstrated loyalty to UNCW, contributed to the aademic quality of the University, or had a significant role in uniting the institution and the community." and lists the charter members that were named by Chancellor Wagoner in 1988. These thirteen faculty members include: Louis Adcock, Mary Bellamy, Walter Biggs, William Brooks, Thomas Brown, Joanne Corbett, Marshall Crews, Calvin Doss, Thomas Lupton, Dorothy Marshall, Duncan Randall, Gerald Rosselt, and Doug Swink. William Wagoner was given an honorary membership. 

In 1991, the Order expanded membership to include not just faculty members who worked at Wilmington College on Market Street but also members of the staff and faculty that had contributed to the development of UNCW. Associate memberships were given to people that had aided in the founding of the institution and to members of the Board of Trustees. A second plaque, that is currently being updated to include new memberships, was also dedicated on October 24, 1993 to honor these members. 

 

More photographs from the plaque dedication

History of the Order of Isaac Bear

A 2007 article about the Order of Isaac Bear in UNCW Magazine

Photo of members of the Order of Isaac Bear, October 16, 2013

 

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Posted: October 15, 2013

The Seahawk, October 17, 197340 years ago, three musical acts--the Stories, Lynyrd Skynard, and Heather--played in Hanover Hall at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. The venue had a newly installed sound system for the event. Tickets for students were $2.50 in advance or $3.50 at the door.

At the time of the performance the Stories was the biggest name of the three. They had previously released two albumsUndated photograph of Hanover Hall both of which were well reviewed by the music world including Rolling Stone. The group had one popular hit with “Brother Louie.” Wes Knape, a Seahawk newspaper writer, wrote that this had been “a really great song when it was released; however...most of us are tired of it being played so often.”

Lynyrd Skynard had only released their first album in August of 1973 and had not built  up their popularity. Even though they were not nationally recognized, music critics had already begun to hail them as the next big hit to come out of the South. This would prove correct as they would become nationally recognized shortly following their performance at UNCW.

The Seahawk, October 24, 1973

According to students interviewed by the Seahawk, the concert did not exceed their expectations, especially the band Stories. The Seahawk published the thoughts of six students, one of whom did not even attend the concert. The students stated that the new sound system was “out of wack” as the instruments were louder than the vocals. Another complaint was the high number of high school students in the audience. One student protested the high cost of the ticket and suggested bringing in local bands to lower the cost, while another student complained that the bands brought in should be more “well known” and represent a greater variety of musical styles.

List of musical performers at UNCW

Spotlight about Dedication of Hanover Hall

The Seahawk, October 10, 1973The Seahawk, October 17, 1973The Fledgling, 1974

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted: October 09, 2013

UNCW Magazine12 years ago, Michael Jordan came back to his hometown of Wilmington, NC, and to the game of professional basketball after retiring in 1998. 

Jordan began his association with Washington Wizards as president and minority owner in 2000. In October of the same year, he brought the NBA team to the University of North Carolina Wilmington for their training camp. A sold out crowd watched the team at the end of their week-long stay in Trask Coliseum. At that time, the Wizards announced plans to return to UNCW in 2001 for their training camp. This move was anticipated by the Wilmington community, but the excitement and anticipation reached a high when Jordan announced that he would return to the NBA as a Washington Wizards player for the 2001 season.

UNCW was immediately launched into national and international news as it would serve as the location where Jordan would make his latest debut. Jordan October 9, 2001News media from around the country, including ESPN, came to UNCW to cover the event. The event was highly publicized and well received in the community as a whole, but one UNCW student expressed parking-related grievances against the commotion caused by the visit

Jordan played again with the Washington Wizards in Trask Coliseum in 2002.  In later years, when Jordan was affiliated with the Charlotte Bobcats, UNCW welcomed this club for training camps.

 

Jordan October 9, 2001Jordan October 9, 2001UNCW Magazine--Fall/Winter 2001

The Seahawk--September 7, 2000, p 18

The Seahawk--October 12, 2000, p 15-16

The Seahawk--August 30, 2001, p 17

The Seahawk--September 27, 2001, p 16

                                       The Seahawk--October 4, 2001, p 13-15

Jordan October 9, 2001The Seahawk--October 18, 2001, p 19, 21, 24

The Seahawk--October 3, 2002, p 15

The Seahawk--October 13, 2005, p 9

More photos in University Archives: Jordan at UNCW (2001

 

 

See also: news articles about Michael Jordan's summer basketball camp at UNCW in 1987.

 

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Posted: October 02, 2013

The Seahawk, September 1, 1983The North Carolina General Assembly passed the Safe Roads Act of 1983 and The Seahawk, October 13, 1983stipulated that the law would become effective on October 1, 1983. The law had many parts, but it most specifically dealt with drunk driving. The law raised the drinking age in North Carolina from 18 to 19 for beer and wine. The United States Congress would further increase the drinking age nationally the next year with the National Minimum Drinking Age Act of 1984, 23 USC § 158, which mandated that states raise the drinking age to 21 or the government would withhold ten percent of the federal funding for highways. North Carolina complied with the federal law.

The Seahawk, October 6, 1983

 
 

Many students at the University of North Carolina Wilmington voiced opposition and protested the fairness of the new law. The Seahawk published The Seahawk, April 16, 1982editorials against the Safe Roads Act. The treasurer of the SGA even wrote, in an open letter published in the Seahawk on April 16, 1981, that one of the greatest accomplishments of the group during the 1981-1982 school year had been a resolution passed to stand in opposition of the law.

 

 

 

The Seahawk, December 9, 1983While many UNCW students stood in oppostion the administration and the campus police saw the change as a positive, because drinking and parties involving alcohol had become a problem for the school and had begun to tarnish the image of UNCW. Student drinking continued to plague the administration for the years to come.

The Seahawk, September 22, 1988

 

 

 

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