Posted: August 19, 2013

 

North Carolina Living Treasures


Brief Description
Throughout North Carolina, artists living their legacy have been honored since 1986 with
the North Carolina Living Treasures designation by the UNC Wilmington Museum of
World Cultures. This recognition celebrates the value of traditional crafts, craft artists and
their talents, and their contributions to education and society. Since its beginning the biannual
honor has recognized craft artists who are boatwrights, potters, luthiers, marqueters,
blacksmiths, gunsmiths, basket-makers, chair-makers, and glass-makers. These craft artists
reflect talents that were developed over decades of study and work and the highest levels of
achievement in their respective fields.
 
The North Carolina Living Treasures Award is made possible by an endowment to the
University of North Carolina Wilmington from Martin Meyerson, M.D, founder New
Hanover Radiation Oncology Center (now known as Coastal Carolina Radiation Oncology
Center), in Wilmington, N.C., in memory of his mother, Dorothy Meyerson.
The award was originally conceived by UNCW faculty member Dr. Gerald ‘Jerry’ Shinn,
who coordinated the processes until he retired and moved from Wilmington. Dr. Shinn died
January 26, 2013, in Albemarle. Dr. Shinn was an enthusiastic educator and a strong advocate
for this award. We honor his spirit and dedication this year, in 2013. The award is given
every two years. The last recipients, in 2011, were glass artists Mark Peiser and Richard Ritter.
In addition, the Penland School of Crafts was especially acknowledged for their mission of
supporting “individual and artistic growth through craft.”
 
Focus on Book Art
In previous years, nominations of craft artists who work in any or all of the traditional craft
fields were welcome.This year, we have decided to focus on one craft in particular -- book art. In celebration of book artists as craftspeople, we recognize active explorations of both contemporary and traditional artistic practices related to the book as an art object.
 
Exhibit and Reception
The North Carolina Living Treasures 2013 exhibit and reception will be held at the Ann
Flack Boseman Gallery in UNCW’s Fisher University Union. The exhibit and reception will
be co-hosted by the Division of Student Affairs, Department of Art and Art History, and
Randall Library. Details about the exhibit and reception follow:
 
 
Nomination and Selection Process
Nominations of established book artists are welcome. Nominations will be solicited from people
broadly identified throughout the state and accepted from anyone who may make a nomination.
To be selected, the artist must be a current resident of North Carolina and currently working
at the highest levels of accomplishment in the book arts. A selection committee will assemble information on each nominee and will select a person or persons to receive the award this year. We are in the process of identifying the North Carolina Living Treasures 2013 Selection Committee. Judges will include faculty from UNCW’s Art and Art History and English departments, members of the Randall Library staff and a UNCW Art and Art History student.
 
Placing your Nomination

To make nominations, send the following information to Sarah Barbara Watstein at watsteins@uncw.edu no later than August 29, 2013.

  • Your name and contact information
  • The name and contact information for each person that you nominate
Resources
For more information about the North Carolina Living Treasures Award, see http://library.uncw.edu/archives_special/special/north-carolina-living-treasures
 

 

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Posted: September 24, 2013

First Issue of the Seahawk

Sixty-five years ago, on September 27, 1948, a group of college students published and distributed the inaugural edition of the Seahawk--a 4-page mimeographed newspaper. This was the first student publication for Wilmington College.

The charter staff members stressed the importance of the Seahawk as a current and future asset of Wilmington College:

“We are proud and honored to be able to have published this small paper as the first “SEAHAWK.” We are gratified to know that we have been the beginning of something which we believe will grow with time as Wilmington College grows. We have made a small beginning but nevertheless, have taken the first step.”

In 1969, Wilmington College became the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW).

The first Seahawk staff believed that the student newspaper would become an integral part of campus life with the continued support and excitement from the faculty and student body. In order to garner the support and participation of the student body, the Seahawk staff “extend[ed] to the student body an invitation to criticize [their] endeavors and to flail [their] paper as trash if they so desire[d]. But…also an invitation to contribute something useful or something better.” The vision and hopes of the initial Seahawk staff became a reality in 1958 when the Seahawk became a monthly publication.
 

The Seahawk, September 27, 1948 (PDF)

Digital Seahawk Collection, 1948-1973

How to Search the Seahawk

The Power of Print and Pixels: 65 Years of UNCW Student News - New Exhibit in Special Collections Open Until Dec. 3

 

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Posted: November 04, 2013

The Seahawk, November 3, 195855 years ago, the Seahawk released its first monthly issue, becoming Wilmington College's monthly student newspaper after a period of sporadic publication. The news organization promised to striveThe Seahawk, November 3, 1958--p 2 for this level of consistency in the future.

The first Seahawk newspaper was distributed in September 1948. The year 1958 was its reinvigoration, according to the 1959 Fledgling yearbook. A Publications Board, consisting of representatives from the administration, faculty, and student body, was established to support the Seahawk.

The Seahawk remains the student news organization for the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) to this day. Online news services are provided continually and a print newspaper is published every other week. The Seahawk was never a daily newspaper, although publication did rech twice a week at various times.

The Fledgling, 1959

 

The Seahawk, November 3, 1958--View first monthly issue

Digital Seahawk Collection, 1948-1973

How to Search the Seahawk

The Power of Print and Pixels: 65 Years of UNCW Student News - Exhibit in Special Collections Open Until Dec. 3

 

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Posted: February 04, 2014

 

On display in Special Collections from January 15 to May 15 is an exhibit titled, Observing Africa: The Life and Career of Stuart Marks. 

 

Stuart Marks is a biologist and anthropologist whose work has focused on wildlife management, conservation and human development in Africa. Marks was born in Wilmington, North Carolina in 1939 and spent most of his youth living in the Belgian Congo at the American Presbyterian Congo Mission station, Lubondai. After completing his undergraduate degree in Zoology from North Carolina State University, Marks earned a Masters in Wildlife and Quantitative Methods and a Ph.D. in Ecology and Anthropology from Michigan State University. Marks' dissertational work in Zambia with the Valley Bisa culture has been the basis for much of his personal and professional research. His distinguished career includes work as a professor, scholar, independent researcher and consultant in the United States and Africa. He has received numerous honors and has been the recipient of research grants from institutions such as the H.F. Guggenheim Foundation, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Geographic Society and the Ford Foundation Foreign Area Fellowship program. Marks has authored eight books, written chapters for nineteen publications, published eighty-two articles in professional journals and acted as consultant to fourteen major studies. 

 

        

 

Drawing from items held in the Stuart Alexander and Sandy Cole Marks manuscript collection archived in Randall Library Special Collections, this exhibit highlights Marks' life from childhood to present day, spanning numerous countries and careers. Items on display include artifacts, books, correspondence, elephant tusks, field notes, mammalian crania, maps, newspaper articles, photographs, postcards and stamps.

 

 

 

Also take a peak at the newly created Stuart Marks digital collection, documenting numerous photographs digitized from the manuscript collection. 

 

Special Collections in located on the second floor of Randall Library. We are open Monday through Thursday 9-5 and Friday 9-12.

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Posted: February 17, 2014

 

Please join us for a poetry reading from, Collected Poems, with Mike Papadeas on Friday, February 21 at 5:00 p.m. in Special Collections. 

 

                   

 

This recently published book of poetry highlights Papadeas' experience as a Greek immigrant, his career and various important events during his life. Born in Athens, Greece, Papadeas has lived in both Burlington and Kure Beach, North Carolina for the past 40 years. He is a graduate of Auburn University and worked as an electrical engineer with Lucent Technologies for 35 years. In addition to Collected Poems, Papadeas is also the author of a memoir, Coming to America: A Memoir, 1938-1958, published in 2013. Both books are available to view in Special Collections. 

 

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Posted: August 25, 2014

Exhibit Opening, Panel Presentation and Reception

Randall Library Auditorium, RL2047

This exhibit from University Archives invites visitors to witness UNCW’s evolution, stunning accomplishments, and shining role in higher education since 1947.

Wilmington College students enrolled in technical courses such as masonry, drafting, and air conditioning and refrigeration. When the college achieved university status and joined the UNC system in 1969, the chancellor declared

The University of North Carolina is a magnificent system of higher education institutions located throughout the state, but the University of North Carolina at Wilmington is the jewel in this education crown.

--William H. Wagoner
President, Wilmington College, 1968-1969
Chancellor, the University of North Carolina Wilmington, 1969-1990

 

Guest Speakers:

Dorothy Powell Marshall, faculty member and registrar at Wilmington College and UNCW, 1949-1992

Bertha Todd, Williston College Librarian

Ty Rowell, Former UNCW Vice Chancellor for University Advancement

Adina Riggins (Moderator) University Archivist

The Jewel in the Crown will be in Special Collections at Randall Library through December 3, 2014.

The Jewel in the Crown: The University of North Carolina Wilmington

A Journey and Legacy

 

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Posted: February 13, 2015
University Archives worked together with the Honors College to curate an exhibit on the history of Honors at UNCW. The Honors College is currently celebrating two anniversaries: 50 years of Departmental Honors and 20 years of the Honors Scholars Program. Drawing on materials from the Honors College and University Archives documents and artifacts, the exhibit traces the path of honors from Departmental Honors to the Honors Scholars Program to the Honors College of today. 
 
Title banner for Honors College Exhibit: Celebrating Honors College    Graduate Assistant Beth Bullock standing next to the Honors exhibit.
 
Departmental Honors began in 1965, allowing seniors to undertake a yearlong thesis project and graduate “with honors” in their major. In 1994, the Honors Scholars Program was initiated. This program offered an option for students to take part in a four-year honors curriculum and graduate with university honors. In 2011, the Honors Scholars Program was renamed the Honors College to honor its growth and success.
 
 
The exhibit showcases major milestones in the history of Honors, displaying the first thesis, completed in 1965 by Phyllis Boyles; a photo of the first graduate of the 4-year program, Nicholas Allen; and a program from the 2011 dedication of the Honors College. The exhibit also illuminates the wide variety of activities and opportunities the Honors College has sponsored over the years, including research conferences and journals, honors student trips, an award-winning newsletter, and other publications. The exhibit also highlights a few honors students who are now current faculty members, such as Dr. Tom Lankford and Dr. Julian Keith. 
 
Track Team photo from 1983 Fledgling yearbook. Photo includes two honors students, Tom Lankford and Julian Keith.
 
The exhibit will be on display over homecoming weekend and will remain on display through graduation. For more on the Honors College’s anniversaries and homecoming activities visit their website: http://uncw.edu/honors/honors5020.html
 
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Posted: October 16, 2015

A new exhibit about Midnite Madness at the University of North Carolina Wilmington is now on display in the library during operating hours. Check out "Seahawks After Dark" in an exhibit case adjacent to University Archives, Randall Library Room 2008, in between Honors College and University Archives.

   

Midnite Madness honors the start of the UNCW basketball season, and is typically held on a Friday in mid-October. Historically, basketball players could not legally take the court to train until the Friday closest to the 15th of October. This led many schools to start practice soon after midnight on the appointed day to get as much practice time as possible. UNCW held its first Midnight Madness event in 1990. Over the years, and with a couple of rule changes, a name change from "Midnight" to "Midnite," and the addition of other campus wide events, Midnite Madness has evolved to become a week-long celebration for both men's and women's basketball.

 

This exhibit showcases historic photographs of former basketball players and the student body, as well as tangible items portraying Seahawk Spirit. Images of the first flyer advertising the event from the student-run newspaper The Seahawk can be seen along-side flyers from more recent years. The exhibit also displays Midnite Madness t-shirts, one dating to 1998 and others that current students will recognize from past years. The exhibit even shows historic images of the UNCW mascot in its early form, visible on a Student Telephone Directory from the 1989-1990 school year and the "new" logo unvieled in The Seahawk newspaper in 1986.

  

 

Midnite Madness 2015 is on Friday, October 23 with festivities all week. For more information on Midnite Madness, see http://www.uncwsports.com/index.aspx?path=mbball

To view a digital exhibit, see

http://library.uncw.edu/archives_special/exhibits/seahawks-after-dark-evolution-midnite-madness.

 

 

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Posted: November 06, 2015

Sammy C. Hawk stopped by the Midnite Madness exhibit to say hi and take a few photos!

  

 

The new exhibit at Randall Library by University Archives now has a new component.  Take a short 7 question quiz about the information in the exhibit, enter your name at the end (optional) and be entered to win a UNCW themed prize.  This quiz can be answered multiple different ways, depending on the amount of time you have.

 

Find the quiz here!

http://library.uncw.edu/archives_special/forms/midnight-madness-quiz

 

By visiting the exhibit in person, you will be able to find all the information on the quiz in text boxes and captions.

 

You can also view the online exhibit here and find the answers: http://library.uncw.edu/archives_special/exhibits/seahawks-after-dark-evolution-midnite-madness

 

You can also watch a short video, roughly 2.5 minutes long, that will also give you all the information you need to answer the quiz.