Posted: October 16, 2015

A new exhibit about Midnite Madness at the University of North Carolina Wilmington is now on display in the library during operating hours. Check out "Seahawks After Dark" in an exhibit case adjacent to University Archives, Randall Library Room 2008, in between Honors College and University Archives.

   

Midnite Madness honors the start of the UNCW basketball season, and is typically held on a Friday in mid-October. Historically, basketball players could not legally take the court to train until the Friday closest to the 15th of October. This led many schools to start practice soon after midnight on the appointed day to get as much practice time as possible. UNCW held its first Midnight Madness event in 1990. Over the years, and with a couple of rule changes, a name change from "Midnight" to "Midnite," and the addition of other campus wide events, Midnite Madness has evolved to become a week-long celebration for both men's and women's basketball.

 

This exhibit showcases historic photographs of former basketball players and the student body, as well as tangible items portraying Seahawk Spirit. Images of the first flyer advertising the event from the student-run newspaper The Seahawk can be seen along-side flyers from more recent years. The exhibit also displays Midnite Madness t-shirts, one dating to 1998 and others that current students will recognize from past years. The exhibit even shows historic images of the UNCW mascot in its early form, visible on a Student Telephone Directory from the 1989-1990 school year and the "new" logo unvieled in The Seahawk newspaper in 1986.

  

 

Midnite Madness 2015 is on Friday, October 23 with festivities all week. For more information on Midnite Madness, see http://www.uncwsports.com/index.aspx?path=mbball

To view a digital exhibit, see

http://library.uncw.edu/archives_special/exhibits/seahawks-after-dark-evolution-midnite-madness.

 

 

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Posted: February 13, 2015
University Archives worked together with the Honors College to curate an exhibit on the history of Honors at UNCW. The Honors College is currently celebrating two anniversaries: 50 years of Departmental Honors and 20 years of the Honors Scholars Program. Drawing on materials from the Honors College and University Archives documents and artifacts, the exhibit traces the path of honors from Departmental Honors to the Honors Scholars Program to the Honors College of today. 
 
Title banner for Honors College Exhibit: Celebrating Honors College    Graduate Assistant Beth Bullock standing next to the Honors exhibit.
 
Departmental Honors began in 1965, allowing seniors to undertake a yearlong thesis project and graduate “with honors” in their major. In 1994, the Honors Scholars Program was initiated. This program offered an option for students to take part in a four-year honors curriculum and graduate with university honors. In 2011, the Honors Scholars Program was renamed the Honors College to honor its growth and success.
 
 
The exhibit showcases major milestones in the history of Honors, displaying the first thesis, completed in 1965 by Phyllis Boyles; a photo of the first graduate of the 4-year program, Nicholas Allen; and a program from the 2011 dedication of the Honors College. The exhibit also illuminates the wide variety of activities and opportunities the Honors College has sponsored over the years, including research conferences and journals, honors student trips, an award-winning newsletter, and other publications. The exhibit also highlights a few honors students who are now current faculty members, such as Dr. Tom Lankford and Dr. Julian Keith. 
 
Track Team photo from 1983 Fledgling yearbook. Photo includes two honors students, Tom Lankford and Julian Keith.
 
The exhibit will be on display over homecoming weekend and will remain on display through graduation. For more on the Honors College’s anniversaries and homecoming activities visit their website: http://uncw.edu/honors/honors5020.html
 
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Posted: December 08, 2014

 

Archives  Collections: A to Z

Disclaimer: This is not a Records Schedule, which is a much more detailed listing of materials in a University Archives, categorized by function or department. Rather, the purpose of this A-Z list is to identify some of the basic must-haves in Archives.

A

  • Accreditation/self-study reports
  • Admissions guides, bulletins, brochures
  • Alumni magazines and directories
  • Anniversary celebrations - planning materials, publicity, brochures, event information, scrapbooks.
  • Annual reports by offices, units, departments, divisions, college/school, and Chancellor
  • Apparel - see Textiles
  • Architectural plans/designs/blueprints/drawings
  • Area studies/campus studies/traffic studies
  • Art exhibition guides
  • Athletics - programs, news releases, guides, schedules, reports, correspondence, photographs, videos
  • Audit reports
  • Awardee information - biographical information, news releases, and announcements pertaining to faculty, staff, students, and alumni awards
  • Awards and certificates for the university and its departments

B

  • Benchmark Studies
  • BIG (Brand Identity Guide)
  • Board of Trustees – minutes, correspondence, oaths of office, biographical data, official photos, rosters, Executive Committee minutes, commitee minutes and reports
  • Board of Visitors - minutes, rosters, executive committee minutes, committee reports
  • Books, serials, journals, newspapers, and magazines not published by UNCW, but exclusively for or about UNCW
  • Books, serials, journals, newspapers, and magazines published by UNCW, its departments, student organizations or classes
  • Budget reports (official, annual)
  • Business Week programs

C

  • Calendars of Events
  • Camps and youth programs - brochures, guides, policies, reports
  • Campus Crime Awareness and Security Act Reports (annual)
  • Capital Improvements – architect’s proposals, change orders, budget reports.
  • Codes of Student Life/Student Handbooks (annual)
  • Common Data Set
  • Commencement programs, videos, photographs, and speeches
  • Committees and task forces of faculty, staff, and students - minutes, reports, charge, accomplishments
  • Conference programs for university-initiated or sponsored conferences or workshops
  • Contracts (selected)
  • Convocation programs, videos, photoraphs, and speeches
  • Core values
  • Course catalogs
  • Course schedules
  • Cultural activities – brochures, reports, videos
  • Curriculum – committee reports, University Studies reports, updates, news

D

  • Donors – Report of
  • Directory information (student public records formerly published in telephone directories)
  • Directories, miscellaneous (department and school)
  • Directories of Club Sports teams
  • Directories of Student Organization
  • Deans Council - minutes, committee reports, charges

E

  • Equal Employment Opportunity /Affirmative Action Plan (HR)
  • "External Programs" - programs, course descriptions, workshop descriptions for continuing studies

F

  • Faculty Senate minutes, announcements, motions, correspondence, and committee minutes, reports, etc.
  • Factsheets/IPEDS data
  • Financial reports (annual)
  • Foundational documents such as charters, certificates of establishment, acts of legislation central to university development, etc.
  • Friends of UNCW – Annual Reports, minutes, committee reports

G

  • Governance - see Staff Senate, Faculty Senate, Student Government Association, Graduate Student Association
  • Graduate Council - minutes, announcements, motions, correspondence, executive committee minutes, etc.
  • Graduate theses
  • Grants, Awarded. Final reports, statistics of grants activity, proposals.
  • Graduate Student Association - minutes, correspondence, motions, reports, committee charges and accomplishments
  • Groundbreakings and Openings of Buildings  - programs, photographs, announcements, news releases, videos, news articles
  • Guidelines for Publications
  • Guides to Financial Aid

H

  • Handbooks - Faculty
  • Handbooks - Student Organizations
  • Histories of campus and departments
  • Honor Codes
  • Honorary societies - minutes, correspondence, reports, newsletters
  • Honors Papers
  • Housing – Guide to

I

  • Installation, Chancellor. Programs, speeches, event listings, articles, photographs, videos
  • Inventory of Fixed Assets

J

  • Judicial procedures for student conduct

 

K

  • Knowledge production - Copyright registration by UNCW and applications after expiration of copyright; Patent awards, applications, and notice of awards after expiration

L

  • Legal - selected agreements, consent decrees, memoranda of understanding, deeds of sale of university property, etc.
  • Legislation - Acts passed by NC General Assembly
  • Literary and art magazines
  • Long-Range Plans

M

  • Maps
  • Master Plans
  • Memorabilia, historical
  • Mission Statement

N

  • New Faculty and Staff - directories and profiles
  • News articles, editorials, and columns about UNCW from local, statewide, national, and international media organizations
  • News releases
  • Newsletters

O

  • On Campus Living – Guide to
  • Off Campus Living – Guide to
  • Oral Histories - Faculty, Students, Staff, Trustees (including retired)
  • Orientation Guides

P

  • Parents, Guide for
  • Performances - videos, photographs
  • Personnel records (faculty and staff) (selected, after a waiting period)
  • Photographs (University Relations)
  • Planning, Univearsity - correspondence, reports, statistics
  • Policies and Procedures – UNCW
  • Progress Measures Reports
  • Programs - Kenan Auditorium, Department of Music, Department of Theatre, Department of Art
  • Proposals to Establish New Degree Programs
  • Publications, Campus

Q

  • Quality Enhancement Plan
  • Questionnaires - Summary reports and conclusions from student, staff, and faculty surveys

R

  • Razor Walker Awards programs - Watson College of Education
  • Reports prepared for Board of Governors or UNC System President (i.e. UNC Tomorrow)
  • Research / faculty scholarship / student scholarship / creative works by faculty and students (collecting in these areas is coordinated by library with participation of Archives)

S

  • Salary increases and compensation for faculty faculty-reports
  • Scholarships - announcements, names of recipients, acknowledgments of gifts, photographs
  • Scrapbooks
  • Senior Sankofa programs and vidoes - Upperman Center
  • Service Awards luncheons programs and videos
  • Service Learning - eTEAL courses, programs, mission, reports, studies
  • Speeches by chancellor, provost, and senior staff
  • Staff Senate-minutes, announcements, motions, correspondence, reports and committee minutes, reports, etc.
  • Strategic Plans
  • Student Government Association-minutes, announcements, motions, correspondence, reports and committees minutes, announcements, motions, correspondence, reports, charge, accomplishments
  • Student Organization Directories for registered student organizations
  • Student Services - programs, photographs, reports, policies
  • Study Abroad - programs, reports, brochures, posters, photographs
  • Summer School - catalogs, course listings, publications, publicity, special events
  • Synergy – first-year student common read book is collected annually

T

  • Teaching - Blackboard courses, etc.
  • Textiles significant to UNCW-quilts, robes, hoods
  • Telephone directories
  • Timelines
  • Transfer Guides

U

  • UNCW Foundation - Annual Reports, minutes, committee reports
  • University Advancment - Records and statistics for major gifts and inactive endowments
  • University code

V

  • Videos (promotional/Utube/Sports/UNCW Presents/ UNCW Media programming
  • Vision Statement
  • Visual Oral Histories - videotaped oral history recordings. See Oral Histories.

W

  • Works of art reflecting UNCW

X

  • Xeroxed copies (or photocopies) may be acceptable for certain materials, such as final reports and approved minutes. We will want to note where signed originals are permanently kept if Archives maintains photocoopies.

Y

  • Yearbooks

Z

  • Zip discs, floppy disks, cdroms, and other obsolete media. We will work with you on retrieving data from these obsolete media if the information contained on it fit our collecting criteria.
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Posted: November 13, 2014

Brochure with map of the preserve     Front of a brochure for the preserve

A recent research request sent in to University Archives involved the university’s history of land use and property transactions. The Bluethenthal Wildflower Preserve represents one way the university has made use of campus land. This month marks 40 years since the Bluethenthal Wildflower Preserve was dedicated on November 8, 1974. Named for Herbert Bluethenthal, the preserve began with a donation from Mrs. Bleuthenthal in honor of her late husband, a Wilmington native who died in World War I. After her donation in 1973 the university set aside about 10 acres of land behind Hoggard Hall and near the university’s existing nature trail. New trails were created in order to grant easy access to areas that included excellent examples of the native flora of Southeastern North Carolina.  The preserve has been further developed over the years to offer the best examples of unique plants of the region.

The dedication ceremony featured the unveiling of the memorial to Herbert Bluethenthal by Mrs. Bleuthenthal as well as the presentation of a monument honoring the contributions to botany by Dr. Bertram Wells, a noted botanist who worked in North Carolina for much of his career. Both Dr. Wells and Mrs. Bleuthenthal were honored guests at the dedication.

The preserve is intended for use both by the public as well as students in fields such as biology. The University Archives has a range of materials about Bluethenthal Wildflower Preserve and the dedication including photos, brochures, Seahawk newspaper articles, and newspaper clippings in the university’s annual scrapbooks.

2014 photo of Bluethenthal Memorial  2014 photo of bench area in Bluethenthal Preserve

Further Resources from Archives: 

Bluethenthal Preserve Brochures

The Seahawk, November 20, 1974

More Photos from the Dedication Ceremony

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Posted: August 25, 2014

Exhibit Opening, Panel Presentation and Reception

Randall Library Auditorium, RL2047

This exhibit from University Archives invites visitors to witness UNCW’s evolution, stunning accomplishments, and shining role in higher education since 1947.

Wilmington College students enrolled in technical courses such as masonry, drafting, and air conditioning and refrigeration. When the college achieved university status and joined the UNC system in 1969, the chancellor declared

The University of North Carolina is a magnificent system of higher education institutions located throughout the state, but the University of North Carolina at Wilmington is the jewel in this education crown.

--William H. Wagoner
President, Wilmington College, 1968-1969
Chancellor, the University of North Carolina Wilmington, 1969-1990

 

Guest Speakers:

Dorothy Powell Marshall, faculty member and registrar at Wilmington College and UNCW, 1949-1992

Bertha Todd, Williston College Librarian

Ty Rowell, Former UNCW Vice Chancellor for University Advancement

Adina Riggins (Moderator) University Archivist

The Jewel in the Crown will be in Special Collections at Randall Library through December 3, 2014.

The Jewel in the Crown: The University of North Carolina Wilmington

A Journey and Legacy

 

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Posted: May 06, 2014

University Archives student assistant cleans stone replica from collection. Photo by University Archives / UNCWUniversity Archives student assistant cleans item from collection. Photo by University Archives / UNCW.

April 27-May 3, 2014 was American Library Association Preservation Week and May is Preservation Month with loads of great information from the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

What are we doing in University Archives to raise preservation awareness? On this blog throughout May, we will share best practices to extend the life of our rare and unique collections in the University Archives, Randall Library, University of North Carolina Wilmington.

Preservation--also known as “preventive conservation”--emphasizes noninterventive actions to prevent damage to and minimize deterioration of a museum object or archival collection.

For example:

  • Monitoring and recording environmental conditions where collections are housed (e.g., light, relative humidity, temperature, and air pollution)
  • Inspecting and recording the condition of objects
  • Practicing proper handling, storage, exhibit, housekeeping, and packing and shipping techniques

Taj Mahal model in University Archives. These replicas are made in various sizes.  The one in Archives has a base of 9 in. by 9 in.

Taj Mahal model in University Archives. These models are made in various sizes.  This one in Archives has a base of 9 in. by 9 in.

In University Archives, we rely on our excellent student assistants to take on essential preservation and collection care responsibilities.

Allison Thompson, Archives student assistant, wore cotton gloves while carefully cleaning the soapstone  model. First she dry-brushed the item with a fine brush from a collection care kit and then cleaned it with plain water using a similar brush.

For storage, she fabricated custom archival boxes and lids from ArtCareTM 100 percent cotton mat board. Boxes made of this material help create a safe “microchamber” for archival and museum objects.

 

Protective boxes in University Archives for storage of objects.

 

This Taj Mahal mini-replica was a gift to former James Leutze upon his retirement in 2003. He donated it to University Archives at that time. Chancellor Leutze, a historian, was host of the UNC Television series Globewatch and an often-sought speaker on international issues.

Chancellor James Leutze (2007). Photo by UNCW University Relations.
Chancellor James R. Leutze (2007). Photo by UNCW University Relations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reference

Knapp, A. M. (1993, July). Preservation of museum collections. Conserv O Gram, 1(1), 1-2. Retrieved from http://www.cr.nps.gov/museum/publications/conserveogram/01-01.pdf.   

 

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Posted: March 21, 2014

On the ladder, in the stacks of the Gillen Collection

Randall Library won a grant award from the U.S. National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) allowing Special Collections and University Archives to bring a preservation specialist to UNCW to assess these unique collections. The Preservation Assistance Grant (PAG) for Smaller Institutions paid for Matthew S. ("Matt") Johnson of Etherington Conservation Services (ECS) to spend March 17-21 in Special Collections and University Archives for the survey. Next Mr. Johnson will produce a written report of his findings and recommendations for improving collection care.

Mr. Johnson, Senior Rare Book Conservator at ECS in Browns Summit, NC, has been with the company since 1993. He is a 1991 graduate of UNC-Greensboro, where he earned a BFA degree in Design and Printmaking. He trained directly under renowned conservator Don Etherington. Mr. Johnson's responsibilities include staff training, project management, and advanced conservation.

National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) logo

 

 

The NEH PAG for Smaller Institutions helps small and mid-sized institutions—such as libraries, museums, historical societies, archival repositories, cultural organizations, town and county records offices, and colleges and universities—improve their ability to preserve and care for their significant humanities collections. These may include special collections of books and journals, archives and manuscripts, prints and photographs, moving images, sound recordings, or architectural plans and maps. UNCW was awarded $6,000 in January 2014 to fund the preservation assessment.
 

Assessing map case CONTENTS in UNIVERSITY Archives (click on thumbnail)

Matt Johnson assesses map case contents in University Archives.

 

 
 
TAKING LIGHT METER READINGS (click on thumbnail)

Matt Johnson takes light meter readings in Special Collections.

 
 
 
 
Adina Riggins, Rebecca Baugnon, Jerry Parnell FROM UNCW AnD Matt Johnson, NEH Preservation Assistance Grant CONTRACTOR (CLICK on ThumbNail)

University Archives and Special Collection staff pose with NEH PAG contractor..

 

 

 

 

INSPECTING BOOKS (click on thumbnail)

 

 

 

 

SHINING A LIGHT ON PRESERVATION  (click on thumbnail)

Shining a Light on Preservation

 

 

 

 

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Category:
Posted: November 29, 2013

In 1973, the book collection of the William M. Randall Library of the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) reached 100,000 volumes. To celebrate, the library acquired a first edition Huck Finn by Mark Twain (published in 1885) and held a special ceremony. This first edition is in Special Collections.

An announcement for the Nov. 30 ceremony was in the Seahawk student newspaper.

For comparison, according to 2012/2013 statistics, Randall Library has 481,134 books

A couple notes from the library's history:

*Wilmington College Library moved from a few rooms in Alderman Hall to its own building during winter break of 1968. It opened in January of 1969 and the official dedication was March 30.

*Randall Libray began planning an expansion in 1985, which was completed in 1987. 

 

 

This model of Randall Library, circa 1985, is in University Archives in Randall Library at UNCW.
Randall Library Model 1985

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted: November 19, 2013

Seahawk student newspaper 1960John F. Kennedy was elected President of the United States on November 8, 1960. According to an editorial in the Wilmington College student newspaper, JFK came to office with the burden that the people “will expect much, will demand much, and, conceivably, will receive much.”

1963 student newspaperJust three years later, on November 22, 1963, President Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, TX to the shock and horror of the American people. The reaction of one Wilmington College student, Jack Loftus, was captured nearly one month later in the December 18, 1963 issue of the Seahawk. Loftus wrote that the assassination reflected the “barbarism” and “extremism” that had become part of America. He claimed that these attitudes had allowed “some punk with a mail-order rifle [to murder] the President of the United States.”

Theories

Long after Wilmington College became the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW), debates about the nature of the assassination continued. In 1993, UNCW offered a course on the Rhetoric of JFK Assassination Theories.

1993 Seahawk student newspaper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reflections

Virginia Adams, dean of the UNCW School of Nursing from 1994-2008, was a college student when President Kennedy was assassinated. In the interview transcript of her oral history, she spoke of Kennedy's legacy:

Virginia Adams, Ph.D. Photo by UNCW Office of University Relations in 2006Virginia Adams, Ph.D. Former Dean of the School of Nursing. Photo by UNCW Office of University Relations in 2006.

When I was a freshman student, Kennedy was killed .... That had a big impact on us, on my campus, on the students. I mean everybody literally stopped. We believed in this President, and we believed that changes were going to occur because of this President. It was a shock. And it was hurtful. It was painful... the students were mobilizing at that time. So we were a part of the change in the world. Isn't that something to say? “We were a part of the change in the world.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted: November 14, 2013

Lou Buttino. Photo by UNCW Office of University Relations, 2007Lou Buttino. Photo by UNCW/Office of University Relations.

Back in 2005, the documentary Broken Brotherhood: Vietnam and the Boys from Colgate made its North Carolina debut on Veterans Day in Kenan Auditorium at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. The autobiographical film by UNCW professor and filmmaker Lou Buttino addresses division and the potential for healing after the Vietnam War.

It is screening again on Thursday, November 14, 2013, at 7 pm in the UNCW Lumina Theatre, followed by a panel discussion. This event is part of The Big Read Greater Wilmington-2013.

Buttino is a documentary filmmaker and film studies professor. He has taught at UNCW for 19 years.

Broken Brotherhood recounts the path toward reconciliation between Buttino--who had been a conscientious objector during Vietnam--and his college friend, Brian O'Donnell--who became a Vietnam veteran. The two had not spoken for 35 years. The film also explores what happened to other Colgate University students during and after the Vietnam era.

In 2005, Buttino told the Seahawk:

"The idea of making this documentary came to me when I realized I had never made peace with that era," Buttino said. "I felt very wounded to see what happened to my friends, even my best friend/roommate from college [Brian O’Donnell]. Part of the reason I wanted to make this film was so that I could travel across country and talk to him 35 years later and see if we could salvage our friendship. It's a very powerful and emotional film that resonates to today."

“Films can entertain, provoke and inspire. This one is about healing. Healing can help bring wisdom. I hope we will find wisdom regarding the Vietnam War and release from the divisiveness that it inspired. Wisdom is one of the things we never got from the Vietnam War,” Buttino said.

The Seahawk, November 3, 2005--p 4Seahawk student newspaper: "New department chair sees a bright future for film."

 

The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien

UNCW Randall Library partners with The Big Read--Greater Wilmington in 2013.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Big Read Logo

*The Big Read is a program of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with Arts Midwest

 

 

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Posted: November 04, 2013

The Seahawk, November 3, 195855 years ago, the Seahawk released its first monthly issue, becoming Wilmington College's monthly student newspaper after a period of sporadic publication. The news organization promised to striveThe Seahawk, November 3, 1958--p 2 for this level of consistency in the future.

The first Seahawk newspaper was distributed in September 1948. The year 1958 was its reinvigoration, according to the 1959 Fledgling yearbook. A Publications Board, consisting of representatives from the administration, faculty, and student body, was established to support the Seahawk.

The Seahawk remains the student news organization for the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) to this day. Online news services are provided continually and a print newspaper is published every other week. The Seahawk was never a daily newspaper, although publication did rech twice a week at various times.

The Fledgling, 1959

 

The Seahawk, November 3, 1958--View first monthly issue

Digital Seahawk Collection, 1948-1973

How to Search the Seahawk

The Power of Print and Pixels: 65 Years of UNCW Student News - Exhibit in Special Collections Open Until Dec. 3

 

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Posted: October 29, 2013
The Seahawk, October 18, 1978Thirty-five years ago, in October of 1978, the English Club at the University of North Carolina Wilmington sold raffle tickets for $.50 each—which would be less than $2 today, according to the US Department of Labor. The raffle tickets could be purchased from club members or from the secretary of the English Department between the 11th and the 26th of October. The prize to be given to the winner of the raffle was a keg of beer, which the club called “Witches Brew.” Betty Salyer and Bobbi Padgett, two UNCW students and English Club members, were said to have travelled to the place where “witches, goblins, skeletons, and evil spirits” meet to concoct their evil brew. The Seahawk writer assured their readers that all the “members of the English Cub must warn prospective winners of the evil spell that accompanie[d] this ‘evil Fluid.’” The winner was chosen on October 27, 1978.
 
The Seahawk, October 11, 1978
 
 
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Posted: October 24, 2013

October 15, 2013 in Randall LibraryOn October 24, 1993, a plaque was dedicated in Randall Library to commemorate and honor the members of the Order of Isaac Bear, an honorary organization of the University of North Carolina Wilmington. Former Chancellor William H. Wagoner founded the organization as a way to recognize members of the UNCW faculty. These members of the faculty had taught in the Isaac Bear building on Market Isaac Bear PortraitStreet, the original location of Wilmington College later UNCW, and were still employed by UNCW in 1987. The original building, the Bear building on the current campus, and the Order of Isaac Bear were all named in honor of Isaac Bear, the brother of a local businessman.

The plaque reads: "Founded in 1988, the Order recognizes those who have demonstrated loyalty to UNCW, contributed to the aademic quality of the University, or had a significant role in uniting the institution and the community." and lists the charter members that were named by Chancellor Wagoner in 1988. These thirteen faculty members include: Louis Adcock, Mary Bellamy, Walter Biggs, William Brooks, Thomas Brown, Joanne Corbett, Marshall Crews, Calvin Doss, Thomas Lupton, Dorothy Marshall, Duncan Randall, Gerald Rosselt, and Doug Swink. William Wagoner was given an honorary membership. 

In 1991, the Order expanded membership to include not just faculty members who worked at Wilmington College on Market Street but also members of the staff and faculty that had contributed to the development of UNCW. Associate memberships were given to people that had aided in the founding of the institution and to members of the Board of Trustees. A second plaque, that is currently being updated to include new memberships, was also dedicated on October 24, 1993 to honor these members. 

 

More photographs from the plaque dedication

History of the Order of Isaac Bear

A 2007 article about the Order of Isaac Bear in UNCW Magazine

Photo of members of the Order of Isaac Bear, October 16, 2013

 

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Posted: October 15, 2013

The Seahawk, October 17, 197340 years ago, three musical acts--the Stories, Lynyrd Skynard, and Heather--played in Hanover Hall at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. The venue had a newly installed sound system for the event. Tickets for students were $2.50 in advance or $3.50 at the door.

At the time of the performance the Stories was the biggest name of the three. They had previously released two albumsUndated photograph of Hanover Hall both of which were well reviewed by the music world including Rolling Stone. The group had one popular hit with “Brother Louie.” Wes Knape, a Seahawk newspaper writer, wrote that this had been “a really great song when it was released; however...most of us are tired of it being played so often.”

Lynyrd Skynard had only released their first album in August of 1973 and had not built  up their popularity. Even though they were not nationally recognized, music critics had already begun to hail them as the next big hit to come out of the South. This would prove correct as they would become nationally recognized shortly following their performance at UNCW.

The Seahawk, October 24, 1973

According to students interviewed by the Seahawk, the concert did not exceed their expectations, especially the band Stories. The Seahawk published the thoughts of six students, one of whom did not even attend the concert. The students stated that the new sound system was “out of wack” as the instruments were louder than the vocals. Another complaint was the high number of high school students in the audience. One student protested the high cost of the ticket and suggested bringing in local bands to lower the cost, while another student complained that the bands brought in should be more “well known” and represent a greater variety of musical styles.

List of musical performers at UNCW

Spotlight about Dedication of Hanover Hall

The Seahawk, October 10, 1973The Seahawk, October 17, 1973The Fledgling, 1974

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted: October 09, 2013

UNCW Magazine12 years ago, Michael Jordan came back to his hometown of Wilmington, NC, and to the game of professional basketball after retiring in 1998. 

Jordan began his association with Washington Wizards as president and minority owner in 2000. In October of the same year, he brought the NBA team to the University of North Carolina Wilmington for their training camp. A sold out crowd watched the team at the end of their week-long stay in Trask Coliseum. At that time, the Wizards announced plans to return to UNCW in 2001 for their training camp. This move was anticipated by the Wilmington community, but the excitement and anticipation reached a high when Jordan announced that he would return to the NBA as a Washington Wizards player for the 2001 season.

UNCW was immediately launched into national and international news as it would serve as the location where Jordan would make his latest debut. Jordan October 9, 2001News media from around the country, including ESPN, came to UNCW to cover the event. The event was highly publicized and well received in the community as a whole, but one UNCW student expressed parking-related grievances against the commotion caused by the visit

Jordan played again with the Washington Wizards in Trask Coliseum in 2002.  In later years, when Jordan was affiliated with the Charlotte Bobcats, UNCW welcomed this club for training camps.

 

Jordan October 9, 2001Jordan October 9, 2001UNCW Magazine--Fall/Winter 2001

The Seahawk--September 7, 2000, p 18

The Seahawk--October 12, 2000, p 15-16

The Seahawk--August 30, 2001, p 17

The Seahawk--September 27, 2001, p 16

                                       The Seahawk--October 4, 2001, p 13-15

Jordan October 9, 2001The Seahawk--October 18, 2001, p 19, 21, 24

The Seahawk--October 3, 2002, p 15

The Seahawk--October 13, 2005, p 9

More photos in University Archives: Jordan at UNCW (2001

 

 

See also: news articles about Michael Jordan's summer basketball camp at UNCW in 1987.

 

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Posted: October 02, 2013

The Seahawk, September 1, 1983The North Carolina General Assembly passed the Safe Roads Act of 1983 and The Seahawk, October 13, 1983stipulated that the law would become effective on October 1, 1983. The law had many parts, but it most specifically dealt with drunk driving. The law raised the drinking age in North Carolina from 18 to 19 for beer and wine. The United States Congress would further increase the drinking age nationally the next year with the National Minimum Drinking Age Act of 1984, 23 USC § 158, which mandated that states raise the drinking age to 21 or the government would withhold ten percent of the federal funding for highways. North Carolina complied with the federal law.

The Seahawk, October 6, 1983

 
 

Many students at the University of North Carolina Wilmington voiced opposition and protested the fairness of the new law. The Seahawk published The Seahawk, April 16, 1982editorials against the Safe Roads Act. The treasurer of the SGA even wrote, in an open letter published in the Seahawk on April 16, 1981, that one of the greatest accomplishments of the group during the 1981-1982 school year had been a resolution passed to stand in opposition of the law.

 

 

 

The Seahawk, December 9, 1983While many UNCW students stood in oppostion the administration and the campus police saw the change as a positive, because drinking and parties involving alcohol had become a problem for the school and had begun to tarnish the image of UNCW. Student drinking continued to plague the administration for the years to come.

The Seahawk, September 22, 1988

 

 

 

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Posted: September 24, 2013

First Issue of the Seahawk

Sixty-five years ago, on September 27, 1948, a group of college students published and distributed the inaugural edition of the Seahawk--a 4-page mimeographed newspaper. This was the first student publication for Wilmington College.

The charter staff members stressed the importance of the Seahawk as a current and future asset of Wilmington College:

“We are proud and honored to be able to have published this small paper as the first “SEAHAWK.” We are gratified to know that we have been the beginning of something which we believe will grow with time as Wilmington College grows. We have made a small beginning but nevertheless, have taken the first step.”

In 1969, Wilmington College became the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW).

The first Seahawk staff believed that the student newspaper would become an integral part of campus life with the continued support and excitement from the faculty and student body. In order to garner the support and participation of the student body, the Seahawk staff “extend[ed] to the student body an invitation to criticize [their] endeavors and to flail [their] paper as trash if they so desire[d]. But…also an invitation to contribute something useful or something better.” The vision and hopes of the initial Seahawk staff became a reality in 1958 when the Seahawk became a monthly publication.
 

The Seahawk, September 27, 1948 (PDF)

Digital Seahawk Collection, 1948-1973

How to Search the Seahawk

The Power of Print and Pixels: 65 Years of UNCW Student News - New Exhibit in Special Collections Open Until Dec. 3

 

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Posted: September 18, 2013
President Randall with members of the Board of TrusteesJohn T. Hoggard, William M. Randall, Trustee L. Bradford Tillery, and unidentified College Trustee examine plans for new property. (Photo courtesy of Tyrone Rowell)
 

       On September 18, 1958, the Board of Trustees agreed to purchase land off NC Hwy 132 for Wilmington College's first campus. This campus became the permanent home for the college and eventually the University of North Carolina Wilmington.

The Board of Trustees had previously rejected two possible sites--Hugh MacRae Park and the municipal golf course--due to public controversy.

In 1958 Wilmington College was located in the Isaac Bear Building on Market Street. The Board of Trustees knew the college had outgrown this space and needed another location, but the board did not merely plan for immediate growth. Instead, the members chose a property that would fulfill future needs of expansion. The new property consisted of over 600 acres.

The ability of Wilmington College to purchase the land stemmed from the passage of the North Carolina House Bill 761, An Act to Provide a Plan of Organization and Operation for Community Colleges (1957). It was the first Community College Act in North Carolina. Both Wilmington College and Williston College--a unit of Wilmington College for African American students--were included by name in this act, as they were two-year schools at the time. The act gave the trustees the authority to purchase land deemed “necessary for the proper operation of the college.” It also allowed for the trustees to present the need for a tax levy to the County Commissioners, who would approve a public bond vote. The state would match funds raised by the college up to $600,000 as long as the request was made before June 30, 1958.

Following these guidelines, the Wilmington College Board of Trustees agreed in April 1958 to bring a resolution before the New Hanover County Commissioners. The County Commissioners approved the resolution unanimously and set the bond vote for May 30, 1958. The citizens of New Hanover County voted to support Wilmington College and the bond passed.

The Seahawk Newspaper

Board of Trustees Minutes--April 1, 1958, approved resolution to go before the County Commissioners

New Hanover County Commissioners Minutes--April 14, 1958, approval for the bond vote

Board of Trustees Minutes--September 9, 1958, approved the use of funds to buy land for expansion

Board of Trustees Minutes--September 18, 1958, selected the land on NC Hwy 132 for expansion site

Board of Trustees Minutes--September 22, 1958, approved architect and planned for future growth

Board of Trustees Minutes--December 8, 1958, final approval for the purchase of the land off NC Hwy 132

 

First Campus MapUnidentified College Trustee, Trustee L. Bradford Tillery, William M. Randall, and John T. Hoggard examine plans for new College property. (Photo courtesy of Tyrone Rowell)
 

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Posted: September 10, 2013
 
Photo of Judge Ernest Fullwood in 1992

51 years ago, Marshall Collins and Ernest Fullwood were the first African Americans to attend Wilmington College--the institution that grew into the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW).

Fullwood became the first African American student to serve on the Wilmington College Student Senate, and in March of 1966 he was the first African American graduate. Fullwood became an attorney and judge, and Marshall Collins became a minister. Fullwood returned to UNCW on April 17, 2004 to administer the Chancellor's oath of office to Rosemary DePaolo at her installation.

Until September of 1962, African American students attended class at the Williston College campus of Wilmington College. Due to segregation, African American students were not allowed to enroll at the College Road campus.

UNCW Desegregation  

On July 15, 1981, Dr. H. Eaton, chair of the Board of Trustees recalled a meeting he had with Dr. John T. Hoggard in 1961:

It has been 20 years and almost four months to the day since I sat in the parlor of Dr. John T. Hoggard, the Founder of this Institution, and expressed to him my disappointment and concern with the unfairness of the grossly unequal dual program of college education being provided for white students as compared to that being provided for Negro students  ....

A gentlemen’s agreement was reached. With a handshake and no paperwork, Dr. Eaton and Dr. Hoggard agreed that Dr. Eaton would not pursue legal action against the College, and in return Wilmington College would begin admitting qualified African American students in September of 1962 (From These Beginnings: Wilmington College, 1946-1969). 

From the University Archives--This Week in UNCW History: Dr. Eaton was first African American chair of UNCW Board of Trustees, July 15, 1981

1966 Wilmington College graduation program

Memo to the Media: Installation Activities April 14-16, 2004

 

Fledgling 1964Marshall Collins' picture, Wilmington College yearbook 1964

 

 

 

Fledgling 1964Ernest Fullwood's picture, Wilmington College yearbook 1964

 

 

 

Fledgling 1965Ernest Fullwood on Student Senate, Wilmington College yearbook 1965

 

 

 

 

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