Seahawks After Dark: The Evolution of Midnite Madness

A new exhibit about Midnite Madness at the University of North Carolina Wilmington is now on display in the library during operating hours. Check out "Seahawks After Dark" in an exhibit case adjacent to University Archives, Randall Library Room 2008, in between Honors College and University Archives.

   

Midnite Madness honors the start of the UNCW basketball season, and is typically held on a Friday in mid-October. Historically, basketball players could not legally take the court to train until the Friday closest to the 15th of October. This led many schools to start practice soon after midnight on the appointed day to get as much practice time as possible. UNCW held its first Midnight Madness event in 1990. Over the years, and with a couple of rule changes, a name change from "Midnight" to "Midnite," and the addition of other campus wide events, Midnite Madness has evolved to become a week-long celebration for both men's and women's basketball.

 

This exhibit showcases historic photographs of former basketball players and the student body, as well as tangible items portraying Seahawk Spirit. Images of the first flyer advertising the event from the student-run newspaper The Seahawk can be seen along-side flyers from more recent years. The exhibit also displays Midnite Madness t-shirts, one dating to 1998 and others that current students will recognize from past years. The exhibit even shows historic images of the UNCW mascot in its early form, visible on a Student Telephone Directory from the 1989-1990 school year and the "new" logo unvieled in The Seahawk newspaper in 1986.

  

 

Midnite Madness 2015 is on Friday, October 23 with festivities all week. For more information on Midnite Madness, see http://www.uncwsports.com/index.aspx?path=mbball

To view a digital exhibit, see

http://library.uncw.edu/archives_special/exhibits/seahawks-after-dark-evolution-midnite-madness.

 

 

Exhibition Celebrates Honors College Anniversaries

University Archives worked together with the Honors College to curate an exhibit on the history of Honors at UNCW. The Honors College is currently celebrating two anniversaries: 50 years of Departmental Honors and 20 years of the Honors Scholars Program. Drawing on materials from the Honors College and University Archives documents and artifacts, the exhibit traces the path of honors from Departmental Honors to the Honors Scholars Program to the Honors College of today. 
 
Title banner for Honors College Exhibit: Celebrating Honors College    Graduate Assistant Beth Bullock standing next to the Honors exhibit.
 
Departmental Honors began in 1965, allowing seniors to undertake a yearlong thesis project and graduate “with honors” in their major. In 1994, the Honors Scholars Program was initiated. This program offered an option for students to take part in a four-year honors curriculum and graduate with university honors. In 2011, the Honors Scholars Program was renamed the Honors College to honor its growth and success.
 
 
The exhibit showcases major milestones in the history of Honors, displaying the first thesis, completed in 1965 by Phyllis Boyles; a photo of the first graduate of the 4-year program, Nicholas Allen; and a program from the 2011 dedication of the Honors College. The exhibit also illuminates the wide variety of activities and opportunities the Honors College has sponsored over the years, including research conferences and journals, honors student trips, an award-winning newsletter, and other publications. The exhibit also highlights a few honors students who are now current faculty members, such as Dr. Tom Lankford and Dr. Julian Keith. 
 
Track Team photo from 1983 Fledgling yearbook. Photo includes two honors students, Tom Lankford and Julian Keith.
 
The exhibit will be on display over homecoming weekend and will remain on display through graduation. For more on the Honors College’s anniversaries and homecoming activities visit their website: http://uncw.edu/honors/honors5020.html
 

University dedicates Bluethenthal Wildflower Preserve, November 8, 1974

Brochure with map of the preserve     Front of a brochure for the preserve

A recent research request sent in to University Archives involved the university’s history of land use and property transactions. The Bluethenthal Wildflower Preserve represents one way the university has made use of campus land. This month marks 40 years since the Bluethenthal Wildflower Preserve was dedicated on November 8, 1974. Named for Herbert Bluethenthal, the preserve began with a donation from Mrs. Bleuthenthal in honor of her late husband, a Wilmington native who died in World War I. After her donation in 1973 the university set aside about 10 acres of land behind Hoggard Hall and near the university’s existing nature trail. New trails were created in order to grant easy access to areas that included excellent examples of the native flora of Southeastern North Carolina.  The preserve has been further developed over the years to offer the best examples of unique plants of the region.

The dedication ceremony featured the unveiling of the memorial to Herbert Bluethenthal by Mrs. Bleuthenthal as well as the presentation of a monument honoring the contributions to botany by Dr. Bertram Wells, a noted botanist who worked in North Carolina for much of his career. Both Dr. Wells and Mrs. Bleuthenthal were honored guests at the dedication.

The preserve is intended for use both by the public as well as students in fields such as biology. The University Archives has a range of materials about Bluethenthal Wildflower Preserve and the dedication including photos, brochures, Seahawk newspaper articles, and newspaper clippings in the university’s annual scrapbooks.

2014 photo of Bluethenthal Memorial  2014 photo of bench area in Bluethenthal Preserve

Further Resources from Archives: 

Bluethenthal Preserve Brochures

The Seahawk, November 20, 1974

More Photos from the Dedication Ceremony

University library celebrates 100,000th book, November 30, 1973

In 1973, the book collection of the William M. Randall Library of the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) reached 100,000 volumes. To celebrate, the library acquired a first edition Huck Finn by Mark Twain (published in 1885) and held a special ceremony. This first edition is in Special Collections.

An announcement for the Nov. 30 ceremony was in the Seahawk student newspaper.

For comparison, according to 2012/2013 statistics, Randall Library has 481,134 books

A couple notes from the library's history:

*Wilmington College Library moved from a few rooms in Alderman Hall to its own building during winter break of 1968. It opened in January of 1969 and the official dedication was March 30.

*Randall Libray began planning an expansion in 1985, which was completed in 1987. 

 

 

This model of Randall Library, circa 1985, is in University Archives in Randall Library at UNCW.
Randall Library Model 1985

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans Day premiere screening tells of healing after Vietnam War, 2005

Lou Buttino. Photo by UNCW Office of University Relations, 2007Lou Buttino. Photo by UNCW/Office of University Relations.

Back in 2005, the documentary Broken Brotherhood: Vietnam and the Boys from Colgate made its North Carolina debut on Veterans Day in Kenan Auditorium at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. The autobiographical film by UNCW professor and filmmaker Lou Buttino addresses division and the potential for healing after the Vietnam War.

It is screening again on Thursday, November 14, 2013, at 7 pm in the UNCW Lumina Theatre, followed by a panel discussion. This event is part of The Big Read Greater Wilmington-2013.

Buttino is a documentary filmmaker and film studies professor. He has taught at UNCW for 19 years.

Broken Brotherhood recounts the path toward reconciliation between Buttino--who had been a conscientious objector during Vietnam--and his college friend, Brian O'Donnell--who became a Vietnam veteran. The two had not spoken for 35 years. The film also explores what happened to other Colgate University students during and after the Vietnam era.

In 2005, Buttino told the Seahawk:

"The idea of making this documentary came to me when I realized I had never made peace with that era," Buttino said. "I felt very wounded to see what happened to my friends, even my best friend/roommate from college [Brian O’Donnell]. Part of the reason I wanted to make this film was so that I could travel across country and talk to him 35 years later and see if we could salvage our friendship. It's a very powerful and emotional film that resonates to today."

“Films can entertain, provoke and inspire. This one is about healing. Healing can help bring wisdom. I hope we will find wisdom regarding the Vietnam War and release from the divisiveness that it inspired. Wisdom is one of the things we never got from the Vietnam War,” Buttino said.

The Seahawk, November 3, 2005--p 4Seahawk student newspaper: "New department chair sees a bright future for film."

 

The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien

UNCW Randall Library partners with The Big Read--Greater Wilmington in 2013.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Big Read Logo

*The Big Read is a program of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with Arts Midwest

 

 

20 years ago UNCW honors Order of Isaac Bear with plaque dedication, October 24, 1993

October 15, 2013 in Randall LibraryOn October 24, 1993, a plaque was dedicated in Randall Library to commemorate and honor the members of the Order of Isaac Bear, an honorary organization of the University of North Carolina Wilmington. Former Chancellor William H. Wagoner founded the organization as a way to recognize members of the UNCW faculty. These members of the faculty had taught in the Isaac Bear building on Market Isaac Bear PortraitStreet, the original location of Wilmington College later UNCW, and were still employed by UNCW in 1987. The original building, the Bear building on the current campus, and the Order of Isaac Bear were all named in honor of Isaac Bear, the brother of a local businessman.

The plaque reads: "Founded in 1988, the Order recognizes those who have demonstrated loyalty to UNCW, contributed to the aademic quality of the University, or had a significant role in uniting the institution and the community." and lists the charter members that were named by Chancellor Wagoner in 1988. These thirteen faculty members include: Louis Adcock, Mary Bellamy, Walter Biggs, William Brooks, Thomas Brown, Joanne Corbett, Marshall Crews, Calvin Doss, Thomas Lupton, Dorothy Marshall, Duncan Randall, Gerald Rosselt, and Doug Swink. William Wagoner was given an honorary membership. 

In 1991, the Order expanded membership to include not just faculty members who worked at Wilmington College on Market Street but also members of the staff and faculty that had contributed to the development of UNCW. Associate memberships were given to people that had aided in the founding of the institution and to members of the Board of Trustees. A second plaque, that is currently being updated to include new memberships, was also dedicated on October 24, 1993 to honor these members. 

 

More photographs from the plaque dedication

History of the Order of Isaac Bear

A 2007 article about the Order of Isaac Bear in UNCW Magazine

Photo of members of the Order of Isaac Bear, October 16, 2013