Seahawks After Dark: The Evolution of Midnite Madness

A new exhibit about Midnite Madness at the University of North Carolina Wilmington is now on display in the library during operating hours. Check out "Seahawks After Dark" in an exhibit case adjacent to University Archives, Randall Library Room 2008, in between Honors College and University Archives.

   

Midnite Madness honors the start of the UNCW basketball season, and is typically held on a Friday in mid-October. Historically, basketball players could not legally take the court to train until the Friday closest to the 15th of October. This led many schools to start practice soon after midnight on the appointed day to get as much practice time as possible. UNCW held its first Midnight Madness event in 1990. Over the years, and with a couple of rule changes, a name change from "Midnight" to "Midnite," and the addition of other campus wide events, Midnite Madness has evolved to become a week-long celebration for both men's and women's basketball.

 

This exhibit showcases historic photographs of former basketball players and the student body, as well as tangible items portraying Seahawk Spirit. Images of the first flyer advertising the event from the student-run newspaper The Seahawk can be seen along-side flyers from more recent years. The exhibit also displays Midnite Madness t-shirts, one dating to 1998 and others that current students will recognize from past years. The exhibit even shows historic images of the UNCW mascot in its early form, visible on a Student Telephone Directory from the 1989-1990 school year and the "new" logo unvieled in The Seahawk newspaper in 1986.

  

 

Midnite Madness 2015 is on Friday, October 23 with festivities all week. For more information on Midnite Madness, see http://www.uncwsports.com/index.aspx?path=mbball

To view a digital exhibit, see

http://library.uncw.edu/archives_special/exhibits/seahawks-after-dark-evolution-midnite-madness.

 

 

Hot off the presses! Seahawk student newspaper now a monthly, November 3, 1958

The Seahawk, November 3, 195855 years ago, the Seahawk released its first monthly issue, becoming Wilmington College's monthly student newspaper after a period of sporadic publication. The news organization promised to striveThe Seahawk, November 3, 1958--p 2 for this level of consistency in the future.

The first Seahawk newspaper was distributed in September 1948. The year 1958 was its reinvigoration, according to the 1959 Fledgling yearbook. A Publications Board, consisting of representatives from the administration, faculty, and student body, was established to support the Seahawk.

The Seahawk remains the student news organization for the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) to this day. Online news services are provided continually and a print newspaper is published every other week. The Seahawk was never a daily newspaper, although publication did rech twice a week at various times.

The Fledgling, 1959

 

The Seahawk, November 3, 1958--View first monthly issue

Digital Seahawk Collection, 1948-1973

How to Search the Seahawk

The Power of Print and Pixels: 65 Years of UNCW Student News - Exhibit in Special Collections Open Until Dec. 3

 

UNCW English Club raffles keg of “Witches Brew,” October 27, 1978

The Seahawk, October 18, 1978Thirty-five years ago, in October of 1978, the English Club at the University of North Carolina Wilmington sold raffle tickets for $.50 each—which would be less than $2 today, according to the US Department of Labor. The raffle tickets could be purchased from club members or from the secretary of the English Department between the 11th and the 26th of October. The prize to be given to the winner of the raffle was a keg of beer, which the club called “Witches Brew.” Betty Salyer and Bobbi Padgett, two UNCW students and English Club members, were said to have travelled to the place where “witches, goblins, skeletons, and evil spirits” meet to concoct their evil brew. The Seahawk writer assured their readers that all the “members of the English Cub must warn prospective winners of the evil spell that accompanie[d] this ‘evil Fluid.’” The winner was chosen on October 27, 1978.
 
The Seahawk, October 11, 1978
 
 

Stories, Lynyrd Skynard, and Heather perform in Hanover Hall, October 17, 1973

The Seahawk, October 17, 197340 years ago, three musical acts--the Stories, Lynyrd Skynard, and Heather--played in Hanover Hall at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. The venue had a newly installed sound system for the event. Tickets for students were $2.50 in advance or $3.50 at the door.

At the time of the performance the Stories was the biggest name of the three. They had previously released two albumsUndated photograph of Hanover Hall both of which were well reviewed by the music world including Rolling Stone. The group had one popular hit with “Brother Louie.” Wes Knape, a Seahawk newspaper writer, wrote that this had been “a really great song when it was released; however...most of us are tired of it being played so often.”

Lynyrd Skynard had only released their first album in August of 1973 and had not built  up their popularity. Even though they were not nationally recognized, music critics had already begun to hail them as the next big hit to come out of the South. This would prove correct as they would become nationally recognized shortly following their performance at UNCW.

The Seahawk, October 24, 1973

According to students interviewed by the Seahawk, the concert did not exceed their expectations, especially the band Stories. The Seahawk published the thoughts of six students, one of whom did not even attend the concert. The students stated that the new sound system was “out of wack” as the instruments were louder than the vocals. Another complaint was the high number of high school students in the audience. One student protested the high cost of the ticket and suggested bringing in local bands to lower the cost, while another student complained that the bands brought in should be more “well known” and represent a greater variety of musical styles.

List of musical performers at UNCW

Spotlight about Dedication of Hanover Hall

The Seahawk, October 10, 1973The Seahawk, October 17, 1973The Fledgling, 1974

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Legal drinking age in NC goes up to 19, October 1, 1983

The Seahawk, September 1, 1983The North Carolina General Assembly passed the Safe Roads Act of 1983 and The Seahawk, October 13, 1983stipulated that the law would become effective on October 1, 1983. The law had many parts, but it most specifically dealt with drunk driving. The law raised the drinking age in North Carolina from 18 to 19 for beer and wine. The United States Congress would further increase the drinking age nationally the next year with the National Minimum Drinking Age Act of 1984, 23 USC § 158, which mandated that states raise the drinking age to 21 or the government would withhold ten percent of the federal funding for highways. North Carolina complied with the federal law.

The Seahawk, October 6, 1983

 
 

Many students at the University of North Carolina Wilmington voiced opposition and protested the fairness of the new law. The Seahawk published The Seahawk, April 16, 1982editorials against the Safe Roads Act. The treasurer of the SGA even wrote, in an open letter published in the Seahawk on April 16, 1981, that one of the greatest accomplishments of the group during the 1981-1982 school year had been a resolution passed to stand in opposition of the law.

 

 

 

The Seahawk, December 9, 1983While many UNCW students stood in oppostion the administration and the campus police saw the change as a positive, because drinking and parties involving alcohol had become a problem for the school and had begun to tarnish the image of UNCW. Student drinking continued to plague the administration for the years to come.

The Seahawk, September 22, 1988

 

 

 

Students launch Seahawk newspaper, September 27, 1948

First Issue of the Seahawk

Sixty-five years ago, on September 27, 1948, a group of college students published and distributed the inaugural edition of the Seahawk--a 4-page mimeographed newspaper. This was the first student publication for Wilmington College.

The charter staff members stressed the importance of the Seahawk as a current and future asset of Wilmington College:

“We are proud and honored to be able to have published this small paper as the first “SEAHAWK.” We are gratified to know that we have been the beginning of something which we believe will grow with time as Wilmington College grows. We have made a small beginning but nevertheless, have taken the first step.”

In 1969, Wilmington College became the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW).

The first Seahawk staff believed that the student newspaper would become an integral part of campus life with the continued support and excitement from the faculty and student body. In order to garner the support and participation of the student body, the Seahawk staff “extend[ed] to the student body an invitation to criticize [their] endeavors and to flail [their] paper as trash if they so desire[d]. But…also an invitation to contribute something useful or something better.” The vision and hopes of the initial Seahawk staff became a reality in 1958 when the Seahawk became a monthly publication.
 

The Seahawk, September 27, 1948 (PDF)

Digital Seahawk Collection, 1948-1973

How to Search the Seahawk

The Power of Print and Pixels: 65 Years of UNCW Student News - New Exhibit in Special Collections Open Until Dec. 3