Exhibit Opening and Reception, Wed. Aug. 27, 5-7 pm

Exhibit Opening, Panel Presentation and Reception

Randall Library Auditorium, RL2047

This exhibit from University Archives invites visitors to witness UNCW’s evolution, stunning accomplishments, and shining role in higher education since 1947.

Wilmington College students enrolled in technical courses such as masonry, drafting, and air conditioning and refrigeration. When the college achieved university status and joined the UNC system in 1969, the chancellor declared

The University of North Carolina is a magnificent system of higher education institutions located throughout the state, but the University of North Carolina at Wilmington is the jewel in this education crown.

--William H. Wagoner
President, Wilmington College, 1968-1969
Chancellor, the University of North Carolina Wilmington, 1969-1990

 

Guest Speakers:

Dorothy Powell Marshall, faculty member and registrar at Wilmington College and UNCW, 1949-1992

Bertha Todd, Williston College Librarian

Ty Rowell, Former UNCW Vice Chancellor for University Advancement

Adina Riggins (Moderator) University Archivist

The Jewel in the Crown will be in Special Collections at Randall Library through December 3, 2014.

The Jewel in the Crown: The University of North Carolina Wilmington

A Journey and Legacy

 

University library celebrates 100,000th book, November 30, 1973

In 1973, the book collection of the William M. Randall Library of the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) reached 100,000 volumes. To celebrate, the library acquired a first edition Huck Finn by Mark Twain (published in 1885) and held a special ceremony. This first edition is in Special Collections.

An announcement for the Nov. 30 ceremony was in the Seahawk student newspaper.

For comparison, according to 2012/2013 statistics, Randall Library has 481,134 books

A couple notes from the library's history:

*Wilmington College Library moved from a few rooms in Alderman Hall to its own building during winter break of 1968. It opened in January of 1969 and the official dedication was March 30.

*Randall Libray began planning an expansion in 1985, which was completed in 1987. 

 

 

This model of Randall Library, circa 1985, is in University Archives in Randall Library at UNCW.
Randall Library Model 1985

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wilmington College responds to assassination of President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963

Seahawk student newspaper 1960John F. Kennedy was elected President of the United States on November 8, 1960. According to an editorial in the Wilmington College student newspaper, JFK came to office with the burden that the people “will expect much, will demand much, and, conceivably, will receive much.”

1963 student newspaperJust three years later, on November 22, 1963, President Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, TX to the shock and horror of the American people. The reaction of one Wilmington College student, Jack Loftus, was captured nearly one month later in the December 18, 1963 issue of the Seahawk. Loftus wrote that the assassination reflected the “barbarism” and “extremism” that had become part of America. He claimed that these attitudes had allowed “some punk with a mail-order rifle [to murder] the President of the United States.”

Theories

Long after Wilmington College became the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW), debates about the nature of the assassination continued. In 1993, UNCW offered a course on the Rhetoric of JFK Assassination Theories.

1993 Seahawk student newspaper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reflections

Virginia Adams, dean of the UNCW School of Nursing from 1994-2008, was a college student when President Kennedy was assassinated. In the interview transcript of her oral history, she spoke of Kennedy's legacy:

Virginia Adams, Ph.D. Photo by UNCW Office of University Relations in 2006Virginia Adams, Ph.D. Former Dean of the School of Nursing. Photo by UNCW Office of University Relations in 2006.

When I was a freshman student, Kennedy was killed .... That had a big impact on us, on my campus, on the students. I mean everybody literally stopped. We believed in this President, and we believed that changes were going to occur because of this President. It was a shock. And it was hurtful. It was painful... the students were mobilizing at that time. So we were a part of the change in the world. Isn't that something to say? “We were a part of the change in the world.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hot off the presses! Seahawk student newspaper now a monthly, November 3, 1958

The Seahawk, November 3, 195855 years ago, the Seahawk released its first monthly issue, becoming Wilmington College's monthly student newspaper after a period of sporadic publication. The news organization promised to striveThe Seahawk, November 3, 1958--p 2 for this level of consistency in the future.

The first Seahawk newspaper was distributed in September 1948. The year 1958 was its reinvigoration, according to the 1959 Fledgling yearbook. A Publications Board, consisting of representatives from the administration, faculty, and student body, was established to support the Seahawk.

The Seahawk remains the student news organization for the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) to this day. Online news services are provided continually and a print newspaper is published every other week. The Seahawk was never a daily newspaper, although publication did rech twice a week at various times.

The Fledgling, 1959

 

The Seahawk, November 3, 1958--View first monthly issue

Digital Seahawk Collection, 1948-1973

How to Search the Seahawk

The Power of Print and Pixels: 65 Years of UNCW Student News - Exhibit in Special Collections Open Until Dec. 3

 

20 years ago UNCW honors Order of Isaac Bear with plaque dedication, October 24, 1993

October 15, 2013 in Randall LibraryOn October 24, 1993, a plaque was dedicated in Randall Library to commemorate and honor the members of the Order of Isaac Bear, an honorary organization of the University of North Carolina Wilmington. Former Chancellor William H. Wagoner founded the organization as a way to recognize members of the UNCW faculty. These members of the faculty had taught in the Isaac Bear building on Market Isaac Bear PortraitStreet, the original location of Wilmington College later UNCW, and were still employed by UNCW in 1987. The original building, the Bear building on the current campus, and the Order of Isaac Bear were all named in honor of Isaac Bear, the brother of a local businessman.

The plaque reads: "Founded in 1988, the Order recognizes those who have demonstrated loyalty to UNCW, contributed to the aademic quality of the University, or had a significant role in uniting the institution and the community." and lists the charter members that were named by Chancellor Wagoner in 1988. These thirteen faculty members include: Louis Adcock, Mary Bellamy, Walter Biggs, William Brooks, Thomas Brown, Joanne Corbett, Marshall Crews, Calvin Doss, Thomas Lupton, Dorothy Marshall, Duncan Randall, Gerald Rosselt, and Doug Swink. William Wagoner was given an honorary membership. 

In 1991, the Order expanded membership to include not just faculty members who worked at Wilmington College on Market Street but also members of the staff and faculty that had contributed to the development of UNCW. Associate memberships were given to people that had aided in the founding of the institution and to members of the Board of Trustees. A second plaque, that is currently being updated to include new memberships, was also dedicated on October 24, 1993 to honor these members. 

 

More photographs from the plaque dedication

History of the Order of Isaac Bear

A 2007 article about the Order of Isaac Bear in UNCW Magazine

Photo of members of the Order of Isaac Bear, October 16, 2013

 

Students launch Seahawk newspaper, September 27, 1948

First Issue of the Seahawk

Sixty-five years ago, on September 27, 1948, a group of college students published and distributed the inaugural edition of the Seahawk--a 4-page mimeographed newspaper. This was the first student publication for Wilmington College.

The charter staff members stressed the importance of the Seahawk as a current and future asset of Wilmington College:

“We are proud and honored to be able to have published this small paper as the first “SEAHAWK.” We are gratified to know that we have been the beginning of something which we believe will grow with time as Wilmington College grows. We have made a small beginning but nevertheless, have taken the first step.”

In 1969, Wilmington College became the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW).

The first Seahawk staff believed that the student newspaper would become an integral part of campus life with the continued support and excitement from the faculty and student body. In order to garner the support and participation of the student body, the Seahawk staff “extend[ed] to the student body an invitation to criticize [their] endeavors and to flail [their] paper as trash if they so desire[d]. But…also an invitation to contribute something useful or something better.” The vision and hopes of the initial Seahawk staff became a reality in 1958 when the Seahawk became a monthly publication.
 

The Seahawk, September 27, 1948 (PDF)

Digital Seahawk Collection, 1948-1973

How to Search the Seahawk

The Power of Print and Pixels: 65 Years of UNCW Student News - New Exhibit in Special Collections Open Until Dec. 3

 

College selects property for new campus, September 18, 1958

President Randall with members of the Board of TrusteesJohn T. Hoggard, William M. Randall, Trustee L. Bradford Tillery, and unidentified College Trustee examine plans for new property. (Photo courtesy of Tyrone Rowell)
 

       On September 18, 1958, the Board of Trustees agreed to purchase land off NC Hwy 132 for Wilmington College's first campus. This campus became the permanent home for the college and eventually the University of North Carolina Wilmington.

The Board of Trustees had previously rejected two possible sites--Hugh MacRae Park and the municipal golf course--due to public controversy.

In 1958 Wilmington College was located in the Isaac Bear Building on Market Street. The Board of Trustees knew the college had outgrown this space and needed another location, but the board did not merely plan for immediate growth. Instead, the members chose a property that would fulfill future needs of expansion. The new property consisted of over 600 acres.

The ability of Wilmington College to purchase the land stemmed from the passage of the North Carolina House Bill 761, An Act to Provide a Plan of Organization and Operation for Community Colleges (1957). It was the first Community College Act in North Carolina. Both Wilmington College and Williston College--a unit of Wilmington College for African American students--were included by name in this act, as they were two-year schools at the time. The act gave the trustees the authority to purchase land deemed “necessary for the proper operation of the college.” It also allowed for the trustees to present the need for a tax levy to the County Commissioners, who would approve a public bond vote. The state would match funds raised by the college up to $600,000 as long as the request was made before June 30, 1958.

Following these guidelines, the Wilmington College Board of Trustees agreed in April 1958 to bring a resolution before the New Hanover County Commissioners. The County Commissioners approved the resolution unanimously and set the bond vote for May 30, 1958. The citizens of New Hanover County voted to support Wilmington College and the bond passed.

The Seahawk Newspaper

Board of Trustees Minutes--April 1, 1958, approved resolution to go before the County Commissioners

New Hanover County Commissioners Minutes--April 14, 1958, approval for the bond vote

Board of Trustees Minutes--September 9, 1958, approved the use of funds to buy land for expansion

Board of Trustees Minutes--September 18, 1958, selected the land on NC Hwy 132 for expansion site

Board of Trustees Minutes--September 22, 1958, approved architect and planned for future growth

Board of Trustees Minutes--December 8, 1958, final approval for the purchase of the land off NC Hwy 132

 

First Campus MapUnidentified College Trustee, Trustee L. Bradford Tillery, William M. Randall, and John T. Hoggard examine plans for new College property. (Photo courtesy of Tyrone Rowell)
 

Desegregation begins at Wilmington College, September 10, 1962

 
Photo of Judge Ernest Fullwood in 1992

51 years ago, Marshall Collins and Ernest Fullwood were the first African Americans to attend Wilmington College--the institution that grew into the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW).

Fullwood became the first African American student to serve on the Wilmington College Student Senate, and in March of 1966 he was the first African American graduate. Fullwood became an attorney and judge, and Marshall Collins became a minister. Fullwood returned to UNCW on April 17, 2004 to administer the Chancellor's oath of office to Rosemary DePaolo at her installation.

Until September of 1962, African American students attended class at the Williston College campus of Wilmington College. Due to segregation, African American students were not allowed to enroll at the College Road campus.

UNCW Desegregation  

On July 15, 1981, Dr. H. Eaton, chair of the Board of Trustees recalled a meeting he had with Dr. John T. Hoggard in 1961:

It has been 20 years and almost four months to the day since I sat in the parlor of Dr. John T. Hoggard, the Founder of this Institution, and expressed to him my disappointment and concern with the unfairness of the grossly unequal dual program of college education being provided for white students as compared to that being provided for Negro students  ....

A gentlemen’s agreement was reached. With a handshake and no paperwork, Dr. Eaton and Dr. Hoggard agreed that Dr. Eaton would not pursue legal action against the College, and in return Wilmington College would begin admitting qualified African American students in September of 1962 (From These Beginnings: Wilmington College, 1946-1969). 

From the University Archives--This Week in UNCW History: Dr. Eaton was first African American chair of UNCW Board of Trustees, July 15, 1981

1966 Wilmington College graduation program

Memo to the Media: Installation Activities April 14-16, 2004

 

Fledgling 1964Marshall Collins' picture, Wilmington College yearbook 1964

 

 

 

Fledgling 1964Ernest Fullwood's picture, Wilmington College yearbook 1964

 

 

 

Fledgling 1965Ernest Fullwood on Student Senate, Wilmington College yearbook 1965