A blog from Special Collections and University Archives


Posted: October 09, 2013

UNCW Magazine12 years ago, Michael Jordan came back to his hometown of Wilmington, NC, and to the game of professional basketball after retiring in 1998. 

Jordan began his association with Washington Wizards as president and minority owner in 2000. In October of the same year, he brought the NBA team to the University of North Carolina Wilmington for their training camp. A sold out crowd watched the team at the end of their week-long stay in Trask Coliseum. At that time, the Wizards announced plans to return to UNCW in 2001 for their training camp. This move was anticipated by the Wilmington community, but the excitement and anticipation reached a high when Jordan announced that he would return to the NBA as a Washington Wizards player for the 2001 season.

UNCW was immediately launched into national and international news as it would serve as the location where Jordan would make his latest debut. Jordan October 9, 2001News media from around the country, including ESPN, came to UNCW to cover the event. The event was highly publicized and well received in the community as a whole, but one UNCW student expressed parking-related grievances against the commotion caused by the visit

Jordan played again with the Washington Wizards in Trask Coliseum in 2002.  In later years, when Jordan was affiliated with the Charlotte Bobcats, UNCW welcomed this club for training camps.

 

Jordan October 9, 2001Jordan October 9, 2001UNCW Magazine--Fall/Winter 2001

The Seahawk--September 7, 2000, p 18

The Seahawk--October 12, 2000, p 15-16

The Seahawk--August 30, 2001, p 17

The Seahawk--September 27, 2001, p 16

                                       The Seahawk--October 4, 2001, p 13-15

Jordan October 9, 2001The Seahawk--October 18, 2001, p 19, 21, 24

The Seahawk--October 3, 2002, p 15

The Seahawk--October 13, 2005, p 9

More photos in University Archives: Jordan at UNCW (2001

 

 

See also: news articles about Michael Jordan's summer basketball camp at UNCW in 1987.

 

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Posted: October 02, 2013

The Seahawk, September 1, 1983The North Carolina General Assembly passed the Safe Roads Act of 1983 and The Seahawk, October 13, 1983stipulated that the law would become effective on October 1, 1983. The law had many parts, but it most specifically dealt with drunk driving. The law raised the drinking age in North Carolina from 18 to 19 for beer and wine. The United States Congress would further increase the drinking age nationally the next year with the National Minimum Drinking Age Act of 1984, 23 USC § 158, which mandated that states raise the drinking age to 21 or the government would withhold ten percent of the federal funding for highways. North Carolina complied with the federal law.

The Seahawk, October 6, 1983

 
 

Many students at the University of North Carolina Wilmington voiced opposition and protested the fairness of the new law. The Seahawk published The Seahawk, April 16, 1982editorials against the Safe Roads Act. The treasurer of the SGA even wrote, in an open letter published in the Seahawk on April 16, 1981, that one of the greatest accomplishments of the group during the 1981-1982 school year had been a resolution passed to stand in opposition of the law.

 

 

 

The Seahawk, December 9, 1983While many UNCW students stood in oppostion the administration and the campus police saw the change as a positive, because drinking and parties involving alcohol had become a problem for the school and had begun to tarnish the image of UNCW. Student drinking continued to plague the administration for the years to come.

The Seahawk, September 22, 1988

 

 

 

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Posted: September 24, 2013

First Issue of the Seahawk

Sixty-five years ago, on September 27, 1948, a group of college students published and distributed the inaugural edition of the Seahawk--a 4-page mimeographed newspaper. This was the first student publication for Wilmington College.

The charter staff members stressed the importance of the Seahawk as a current and future asset of Wilmington College:

“We are proud and honored to be able to have published this small paper as the first “SEAHAWK.” We are gratified to know that we have been the beginning of something which we believe will grow with time as Wilmington College grows. We have made a small beginning but nevertheless, have taken the first step.”

In 1969, Wilmington College became the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW).

The first Seahawk staff believed that the student newspaper would become an integral part of campus life with the continued support and excitement from the faculty and student body. In order to garner the support and participation of the student body, the Seahawk staff “extend[ed] to the student body an invitation to criticize [their] endeavors and to flail [their] paper as trash if they so desire[d]. But…also an invitation to contribute something useful or something better.” The vision and hopes of the initial Seahawk staff became a reality in 1958 when the Seahawk became a monthly publication.
 

The Seahawk, September 27, 1948 (PDF)

Digital Seahawk Collection, 1948-1973

How to Search the Seahawk

The Power of Print and Pixels: 65 Years of UNCW Student News - New Exhibit in Special Collections Open Until Dec. 3

 

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Posted: September 18, 2013

 

"USO service books index the military experience" reads the title of a recent article in the Jacksonville Daily Newspaper. The service books, less the current representations, mentioned in the article along with numerous photographs, publications, newspapers and various other forms material related to the the United Service Organization (USO) Jacksonville, are among the manuscript holdings in Randall Library's Special Collections. 

The service books include representation from every U.S. state and date back to the 1960s. Filled with thousands of intimate entries, these notebooks once served as main line of communication for troops to provide status updates during their service. The cardboard covers of older notebooks are often illustrated with doodles, city names, sports team insignia and state pride. The news article quotes Marisa Reeder, Jacksonville Center Assistant Director: 

"Having been to the University of North Carolina Wilmington to see the archives it just took my breath away. The decades-old service books transport readers to the past. The entries also help veterans track their fellow service members and allow them to leave a personal mark on the USO itself."

Special Collections received the archives of the USO Jacksonville center in 2011. The collection is being processed with the aid of UNCW Public History graduate assistants. For researchers interested in viewing the collection, please contact Special Collections staff.

 

Althouse, John. "USO service books index the military experience." Jacksonville Daily News 08 09 2013, n. pag. Web. 18 Sep. 2013. <http://www.jdnews.com/news/military/uso-service-books-index-the-military experience-1.199642?page=2>.

 

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Posted: September 18, 2013
President Randall with members of the Board of TrusteesJohn T. Hoggard, William M. Randall, Trustee L. Bradford Tillery, and unidentified College Trustee examine plans for new property. (Photo courtesy of Tyrone Rowell)
 

       On September 18, 1958, the Board of Trustees agreed to purchase land off NC Hwy 132 for Wilmington College's first campus. This campus became the permanent home for the college and eventually the University of North Carolina Wilmington.

The Board of Trustees had previously rejected two possible sites--Hugh MacRae Park and the municipal golf course--due to public controversy.

In 1958 Wilmington College was located in the Isaac Bear Building on Market Street. The Board of Trustees knew the college had outgrown this space and needed another location, but the board did not merely plan for immediate growth. Instead, the members chose a property that would fulfill future needs of expansion. The new property consisted of over 600 acres.

The ability of Wilmington College to purchase the land stemmed from the passage of the North Carolina House Bill 761, An Act to Provide a Plan of Organization and Operation for Community Colleges (1957). It was the first Community College Act in North Carolina. Both Wilmington College and Williston College--a unit of Wilmington College for African American students--were included by name in this act, as they were two-year schools at the time. The act gave the trustees the authority to purchase land deemed “necessary for the proper operation of the college.” It also allowed for the trustees to present the need for a tax levy to the County Commissioners, who would approve a public bond vote. The state would match funds raised by the college up to $600,000 as long as the request was made before June 30, 1958.

Following these guidelines, the Wilmington College Board of Trustees agreed in April 1958 to bring a resolution before the New Hanover County Commissioners. The County Commissioners approved the resolution unanimously and set the bond vote for May 30, 1958. The citizens of New Hanover County voted to support Wilmington College and the bond passed.

The Seahawk Newspaper

Board of Trustees Minutes--April 1, 1958, approved resolution to go before the County Commissioners

New Hanover County Commissioners Minutes--April 14, 1958, approval for the bond vote

Board of Trustees Minutes--September 9, 1958, approved the use of funds to buy land for expansion

Board of Trustees Minutes--September 18, 1958, selected the land on NC Hwy 132 for expansion site

Board of Trustees Minutes--September 22, 1958, approved architect and planned for future growth

Board of Trustees Minutes--December 8, 1958, final approval for the purchase of the land off NC Hwy 132

 

First Campus MapUnidentified College Trustee, Trustee L. Bradford Tillery, William M. Randall, and John T. Hoggard examine plans for new College property. (Photo courtesy of Tyrone Rowell)
 

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Posted: September 10, 2013
 
Photo of Judge Ernest Fullwood in 1992

51 years ago, Marshall Collins and Ernest Fullwood were the first African Americans to attend Wilmington College--the institution that grew into the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW).

Fullwood became the first African American student to serve on the Wilmington College Student Senate, and in March of 1966 he was the first African American graduate. Fullwood became an attorney and judge, and Marshall Collins became a minister. Fullwood returned to UNCW on April 17, 2004 to administer the Chancellor's oath of office to Rosemary DePaolo at her installation.

Until September of 1962, African American students attended class at the Williston College campus of Wilmington College. Due to segregation, African American students were not allowed to enroll at the College Road campus.

UNCW Desegregation  

On July 15, 1981, Dr. H. Eaton, chair of the Board of Trustees recalled a meeting he had with Dr. John T. Hoggard in 1961:

It has been 20 years and almost four months to the day since I sat in the parlor of Dr. John T. Hoggard, the Founder of this Institution, and expressed to him my disappointment and concern with the unfairness of the grossly unequal dual program of college education being provided for white students as compared to that being provided for Negro students  ....

A gentlemen’s agreement was reached. With a handshake and no paperwork, Dr. Eaton and Dr. Hoggard agreed that Dr. Eaton would not pursue legal action against the College, and in return Wilmington College would begin admitting qualified African American students in September of 1962 (From These Beginnings: Wilmington College, 1946-1969). 

From the University Archives--This Week in UNCW History: Dr. Eaton was first African American chair of UNCW Board of Trustees, July 15, 1981

1966 Wilmington College graduation program

Memo to the Media: Installation Activities April 14-16, 2004

 

Fledgling 1964Marshall Collins' picture, Wilmington College yearbook 1964

 

 

 

Fledgling 1964Ernest Fullwood's picture, Wilmington College yearbook 1964

 

 

 

Fledgling 1965Ernest Fullwood on Student Senate, Wilmington College yearbook 1965

 

 

 

 

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Posted: August 19, 2013

 

North Carolina Living Treasures


Brief Description
Throughout North Carolina, artists living their legacy have been honored since 1986 with
the North Carolina Living Treasures designation by the UNC Wilmington Museum of
World Cultures. This recognition celebrates the value of traditional crafts, craft artists and
their talents, and their contributions to education and society. Since its beginning the biannual
honor has recognized craft artists who are boatwrights, potters, luthiers, marqueters,
blacksmiths, gunsmiths, basket-makers, chair-makers, and glass-makers. These craft artists
reflect talents that were developed over decades of study and work and the highest levels of
achievement in their respective fields.
 
The North Carolina Living Treasures Award is made possible by an endowment to the
University of North Carolina Wilmington from Martin Meyerson, M.D, founder New
Hanover Radiation Oncology Center (now known as Coastal Carolina Radiation Oncology
Center), in Wilmington, N.C., in memory of his mother, Dorothy Meyerson.
The award was originally conceived by UNCW faculty member Dr. Gerald ‘Jerry’ Shinn,
who coordinated the processes until he retired and moved from Wilmington. Dr. Shinn died
January 26, 2013, in Albemarle. Dr. Shinn was an enthusiastic educator and a strong advocate
for this award. We honor his spirit and dedication this year, in 2013. The award is given
every two years. The last recipients, in 2011, were glass artists Mark Peiser and Richard Ritter.
In addition, the Penland School of Crafts was especially acknowledged for their mission of
supporting “individual and artistic growth through craft.”
 
Focus on Book Art
In previous years, nominations of craft artists who work in any or all of the traditional craft
fields were welcome.This year, we have decided to focus on one craft in particular -- book art. In celebration of book artists as craftspeople, we recognize active explorations of both contemporary and traditional artistic practices related to the book as an art object.
 
Exhibit and Reception
The North Carolina Living Treasures 2013 exhibit and reception will be held at the Ann
Flack Boseman Gallery in UNCW’s Fisher University Union. The exhibit and reception will
be co-hosted by the Division of Student Affairs, Department of Art and Art History, and
Randall Library. Details about the exhibit and reception follow:
 
 
Nomination and Selection Process
Nominations of established book artists are welcome. Nominations will be solicited from people
broadly identified throughout the state and accepted from anyone who may make a nomination.
To be selected, the artist must be a current resident of North Carolina and currently working
at the highest levels of accomplishment in the book arts. A selection committee will assemble information on each nominee and will select a person or persons to receive the award this year. We are in the process of identifying the North Carolina Living Treasures 2013 Selection Committee. Judges will include faculty from UNCW’s Art and Art History and English departments, members of the Randall Library staff and a UNCW Art and Art History student.
 
Placing your Nomination

To make nominations, send the following information to Sarah Barbara Watstein at watsteins@uncw.edu no later than August 29, 2013.

  • Your name and contact information
  • The name and contact information for each person that you nominate
Resources
For more information about the North Carolina Living Treasures Award, see http://library.uncw.edu/archives_special/special/north-carolina-living-treasures
 

 

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Posted: August 07, 2013

Welcome!

Here in Randall Library's Special Collections, we're kicking off the start of a new school year with a new blog- a space we would like to purpose for the discussion of projects in process, new acquisitions, exhibits and to showcase some of our rare, one-of-a-kind or otherwise unique items housed in the department. It should be fun for us and for you, and we'll all learn something!

Special collections encompasses the full gamut of research topics and formats, serving every discipline in the academic curriculum in addition to a diverse patron base- from the general public to special interest groups to students and research scholars at all levels of higher education. We are home to approximately 17,000 rare and special books, 330 manuscript collections, 1500 oral histories and a variety of maps, photographs and artwork. Focusing on Wilmington and Lower Cape Fear regional history, highlights from our collections include: 

 
  • The Southeast North Carolina Collection, containing books, monographs and maps pertaining to the region or authored by southeastern North Carolina residents.
  • Manuscript collections of prominent Cape Fearians, Wilmington businesses and civic groups, and the North Carolina coastal environment. 
  • An Oral History collection entailing interviews of Wilmington College and UNC Wilmington alumni, southeastern North Carolina artists, military veterans and chaplains, and health care professionals in New Hanover County. 

Other collections distinctive to Special Collections include:

  • The North Carolina Visual Arts and Artists collection created by artist and former UNC Wilmington professor, Claude Howell. The collection comprises newspaper clippings, posters, exhibit programs and other ephemera documenting more than 20,000 artists working in North Carolina between 1900 and 1986.
  • The John Gunn Sports collection, embodying nearly 8,000 game day programs and media guides focusing on both college and professional sports, primarily football.
  • The History of Science Rare Book collection donated by Dr. Ralph W. Brauer, representing international scientific thought spanning three centuries.
  • The History of Medicine Collection, donated by Dr. H. William Gillen, consisting of medical literature dating back to 1600 with an emphasis in neurology.

Planning your visit:

Special Collections is located on the second floor of Randall library. During the Fall and Spring semesters, our hours of operation are Monday-Thursday 9-5 and Friday 9-12; however, we encourage researchers to make an appointment.

  • Only pencils, paper and laptop computers are permitted in the reading room to ensure collection safety. Digital cameras are allowed for use with unrestricted materials, however we ask that you please turn off the flash element. Lockers are available for storage of personal belongings. 
  • Access to certain collections may be limited under the following conditions: when donor restrictions are imposed; when physical condition warrants restricted use; or when papers are being processed. Staff will work with researchers to facilitate access in the case of collections in process.
  • Photocopying is a service determined by Special Collections.

More information regarding our collections can be found on the Special Collections home page

 

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