Randall Library Home

New Scholarship from UNCW Faculty

Syndicate content

TickBot: A novel robotic device for controlling tick populations in the natural environment.


TickBot: A novel robotic device for controlling tick populations in the natural environment.

Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2014 Dec 11;

Authors: Gaff HD, White A, Leas K, Kelman P, Squire JC, Livingston DL, Sullivan GA, Baker EW, Sonenshine DE

Abstract
A semi-autonomous 4-wheeled robot (TickBot) was fitted with a denim cloth treated with an acaricide (permethrin™) and tested for its ability to control ticks in a tick-infested natural environment in Portsmouth, Virginia. The robot's sensors detect a magnetic field signal from a guide wire encased in 80m polyethylene tubing, enabling the robot to follow the trails, open areas and other terrain where the tubing was located. To attract ticks to the treated area, CO2 was distributed through the same tubing, fitted with evenly spaced pores and flow control valves, which permitted uniform CO2 distribution. Tests were done to determine the optimum frequency for TickBot to traverse the wire-guided treatment site as well as the duration of operation that could be accomplished on a single battery charge. Prior to treatment, dragging was done to determine the natural abundance of ticks in the test site. Controls were done without CO2 and without permethrin. TickBot proved highly effective in reducing the overall tick densities to nearly zero with the treatment that included both carbon dioxide pretreatment and the permethrin treated cloth. Following a 60min traverse of the treatment areas, adult tick numbers, almost entirely Amblyomma americanum, was reduced to zero within 1h and remained at or near zero for 24h. Treatments without CO2 also showed reduction of ticks to near zero within 1h, but the populations were no different than the control sections at 4h. This study demonstrates the efficacy of TickBot as a tick control device to significantly reduce the risk of tick bites and disease transmission to humans and companion animals visiting a previously tick-infested natural environment. Continued deployment of TickBot for additional days or weeks can assure a relatively tick-safe environment for enjoyment by the public.

PMID: 25499615 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Diet-induced obesity attenuates cytokine production following an immune challenge.


Related Articles

Diet-induced obesity attenuates cytokine production following an immune challenge.

Behav Brain Res. 2014 Jul 1;267:33-41

Authors: Baumgarner KM, Setti S, Diaz C, Littlefield A, Jones A, Kohman RA

Abstract
Obesity increases susceptibility for numerous diseases and neurological disorders including cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, and dementia. One factor that may contribute to the increased risk for these conditions is the development of chronic inflammation. The current study evaluated whether diet-induced obesity (DIO) affects cognitive performance by increasing neuroinflammation and prolonging the behavioral and inflammatory response to an immune challenge. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat (60% fat) or control diet (10% fat) for 2 or 5 months. After consuming their respective diets for two months, sickness associated behaviors were assessed 4 and 24h after a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline injection. In a separate experiment, DIO and control mice were tested for spatial learning in the water maze and challenged with LPS one month later. Peripheral cytokine production was assessed in adipose and spleen samples and the neuroinflammatory response was assessed in hippocampal, cortical, and brain samples. DIO impaired acquisition of a spatial learning task relative to control mice. However, these deficits are unlikely to be related to inflammation as DIO showed no changes in basal cytokine levels within the periphery or brain. Further, in response to LPS DIO mice showed comparable or attenuated levels of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 relative to control mice. DIO also reduced hippocampal expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and the pre-synaptic marker synaptophysin. Presently, the data indicate that DIO suppresses aspects of the immune response and that cognitive deficits associated with DIO may be related to reduced neurotrophic support rather than inflammation.

PMID: 24657736 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

View ProQuest search results


Follow the link to view all documents in ProQuest for your search

Children's Number-Line Estimation Shows Development of Measurement Skills (Not Number Representations).


Developmental Psychology; 06/01/2014
(AN 96249186)
Criminal Justice Abstracts

Applying a Resiliency Model to Community Reintegration and Needs in Families with Traumatic Brain Injury: Implications for Rehabilitation Counselors.


Journal of Applied Rehabilitation Counseling; 03/01/2014
(AN 95045799)
Criminal Justice Abstracts

Introduction to the Special Issue on Queer/ing Criminology: New Directions and Frameworks.


Critical Criminology; 03/01/2014
(AN 94317402)
Criminal Justice Abstracts

Success or sorrow: the paradoxical view of crime control campaigns in China.


International Journal of Comparative & Applied Criminal Justice; 01/01/2014
(AN 93018776)
Criminal Justice Abstracts

Use of Craniofacial Superimposition in Historic Investigation.


Journal of Forensic Sciences (Wiley-Blackwell); 01/01/2014
(AN 93569166)
Criminal Justice Abstracts

View ProQuest search results


Follow the link to view all documents in ProQuest for your search

Women Physicians and Professional Ethos in Nineteenth-Century America , by Carolyn Skinner.


RSQ: Rhetoric Society Quarterly; 08/01/2014
(AN 97901734)
Communication & Mass Media Complete

Renovating Rhetoric in Christian Tradition, 2014.


American Communication Journal; 06/01/2014
(AN 97065126)
Communication & Mass Media Complete

The Impact of Presentation Form, Entrepreneurial Passion, and Perceived Preparedness on Obtaining Grant Funding.


Journal of Business & Technical Communication; 04/01/2014
(AN 94842156)
Communication & Mass Media Complete

Are Equities Good Inflation Hedges? A Frequency Domain Perspective


Publication date: Available online 17 December 2014
Source:Review of Financial Economics

Author(s): Cetin Ciner

By using industry level data, we examine the relation between equity returns and inflation in a frequency dependent framework. Our analysis shows that a positive relation in fact exists between equity returns and high frequency inflation shocks for commodity and technology related industries. Since higher frequency shocks are independent from trend and are transitory in nature, our findings imply a positive relation between stock returns and the unexpected component of inflation. Furthermore, we show that the results are robust to firm-level data by using a sample from oil industry. Hence, our study provides a new look at the impact of inflation on equities by showing the sensitivity of conclusions in prior work to frequency dependence in data.





Effects of resveratrol on growth and skeletal muscle physiology of juvenile southern flounder


Publication date: Available online 16 December 2014
Source:Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology

Author(s): Whitney N. Wilson , Bradley L. Baumgarner , Wade O. Watanabe , Md Shah Alam , Stephen T. Kinsey

Resveratrol is a naturally occurring antioxidant that has been widely studied in mammals due to its potential to extend lifespan. However, antioxidants may also limit protein damage and therefore reduce rates of protein degradation, providing a potential avenue for enhancing growth in an aquaculture setting. The present study tested the hypotheses that in Southern flounder, Paralichthys lethostigma, resveratrol would decrease protein carbonylation and 4-HNE (indicators of protein and lipid oxidative damage, respectively), levels of ubiquitinylation and LC3 (indicators of non-lysosomal and lysosomal protein degradation, respectively), while having no effect on S6K activation (indicator of protein synthesis). These effects were predicted to increase growth rate. Mitochondrial volume density was also examined since resveratrol may lead to the proliferation of mitochondria, which are the principal source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause oxidative damage. Juvenile fish (n=142) were fed a control diet or a diet supplemented with 600μg resveratrol per g of food for 16weeks. Fish treated with resveratrol had a 9% greater length and 33% greater body mass than control fish after 16weeks. Additionally, there was lower protein carbonylation and lipid 4-HNE within the muscle tissues of treated fish, indicating decreased oxidative damage, and reduced protein ubiquitinylation in the resveratrol fed flounder, indicating less protein degradation. However, there was not a significant difference in LC3, S6K activation, or mitochondrial volume density. These results suggest that resveratrol has positive effects on growth that may be due to its antioxidant properties that reduce non-lysosomal protein degradation.





TickBot: A novel robotic device for controlling tick populations in the natural environment


Publication date: Available online 12 December 2014
Source:Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases

Author(s): Holly D. Gaff , Alexis White , Kyle Leas , Pamela Kelman , James C. Squire , David L. Livingston , Gerald A. Sullivan , Elizabeth W. Baker , Daniel E. Sonenshine

A semi-autonomous 4-wheeled robot (TickBot) was fitted with a denim cloth treated with an acaricide (permethrin™) and tested for its ability to control ticks in a tick-infested natural environment in Portsmouth, Virginia. The robot's sensors detect a magnetic field signal from a guide wire encased in 80m polyethylene tubing, enabling the robot to follow the trails, open areas and other terrain where the tubing was located. To attract ticks to the treated area, CO2 was distributed through the same tubing, fitted with evenly spaced pores and flow control valves, which permitted uniform CO2 distribution. Tests were done to determine the optimum frequency for TickBot to traverse the wire-guided treatment site as well as the duration of operation that could be accomplished on a single battery charge. Prior to treatment, dragging was done to determine the natural abundance of ticks in the test site. Controls were done without CO2 and without permethrin. TickBot proved highly effective in reducing the overall tick densities to nearly zero with the treatment that included both carbon dioxide pretreatment and the permethrin treated cloth. Following a 60min traverse of the treatment areas, adult tick numbers, almost entirely Amblyomma americanum, was reduced to zero within 1h and remained at or near zero for 24h. Treatments without CO2 also showed reduction of ticks to near zero within 1h, but the populations were no different than the control sections at 4h. This study demonstrates the efficacy of TickBot as a tick control device to significantly reduce the risk of tick bites and disease transmission to humans and companion animals visiting a previously tick-infested natural environment. Continued deployment of TickBot for additional days or weeks can assure a relatively tick-safe environment for enjoyment by the public.





feedback