Nicholas W. Schenck Diary — Section 1 of 5 (next) 
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"The American - Fanning Line"

The first Fanning who came to this country was Edmund Fanning - born in Ireland in (about)

1620 - of the Fannings in Ireland - Limerick, Tipperary, Kilkinny, Clare - the name is on record from 13th Century to confutation under Cromwell in 1652. Vast estates were established to the Fannings.

Edmund - the emigrant American ancestor - who settled in Connecticut about 1653 was the son of Francis Fanning, 1841 Mayor of Limerick, Ireland - Connaught Certification Office of Exchequer, Dublin. His name is given as Fitz - Francis Fanning. Fit-Francis means son of Francis - Fitz is French or Norman meaning "son of ____".

This Edmund or Edmond - emigrated to America in 1653 (authority) of John O'Hart, Edmund Irish antiquity and author of Irish Peogries - Clentus of Ireland and is found at Fisher Island in 1655 and 1657, later at Groton - Connecticut (near New London) 1664 - now called Ledyard - where he had a farm called Groton Farm - which remained in possession of family for 150 years - where he lived until his death in 1683. It is recorded - Edmund was the friend of Gov. Winthrop and came to what was called the Pequot Country - possibly by invite of Winthrop.

The oldest court record in the New London Court Book (Comm and Earn) Dec 29, 1664 affirms Edmund Fannings name. Edmund Fanning was on of the original proprietors of Stonington - Conn. He received in grants 542 acres of land - in addition to his "New London" - "Groton" and Volunteer grants - certain grant - 2 miles N of Old Mystic - Eastward of River was merged into "Hempstead Farm"

Stonington Town Records record his name Feb 9 -1669, 1676, 1674, 1677, 1673 and 1680 Elected Surveyor of Highway. (Made a freeman 17 May 1673) took Freeman Oath 27 April 1674.

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Edmund Fanning served in the "King Phillip War" - 1675-76 - as also his sons (3) Edmund, Thomas and John (see Old Proprietors Record Book - Volunteer Com.) Edmund served in Narragansett Was as evident by lots of land - granted to him for service. Thomas Minor (Diary 1663-1667) makes frequent notice of Edmund and his wife (Ellen) calling her "good wife Fanning" and "sister Fanning"

Edmund was a man of influence and usefulness holding various offices of trust - receiving large grants of land from New London and Stonington - active service in the Indian Wars with his 3 sons.

Died December 1683 - Stonington - Conn. (About 64 yrs of age)

The records of New London - Conn were burned by Arnold (the traitor) Sept 6 - 1781 - hence many dates lost.

At "cemetery" Riverhead - Long Island is a gravestone erected 1849 and removed 1861 - the inscription set forth - "Capt. James Fanning - age and great-grandson of Dominick - mayor (under Charles I) city in Ireland - (prisoner captured) Battle of Drogheda - beheaded and his son Edmund married Catherine - daughter Hugh Hays - Earl of Connaught. Edmund emigrated to America with his wife Catherine and 2 sons - Thomas and William and 2 servants - Lahorne and Oma and settled in Stonington - Conn. And more".

The above information cannot be proven by historical record - it has many errors and therefore should be discarded.

Edmund the first settler in America - father was named Francis - Edmund married in Ireland and his wife's name was Ellen - beyond that no record - as to Irish Family - it is a certainty -

It is correct Dominick Fanning was mayor of Limerick - 3 times - 1641 - 1645 - 1646- member of Parliament 1644 at the siege of Limerick 1651 - surrendered 29 Oct 1651 - Dominick with 20 others were excluded from the terms of surrender because Gen. Ludlow said "they had prevailed on the people to foolishly protest the siege."

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Of those 21 - Maj Gen Hugh O'Neal was spared by efforts of General Ludlow. Bishop Ed O'Dugan escaped through the connivance of the same the others were executed - Dominick Fanning endeavoring to escape from a church was caught - hanged - body quartered and decapitated - his head on a pole - placed at St. John's Gate.

This record as (factum) is correct -

So far as research and record can prove - the Genealogy of the American Fannings is as follows - First emigrant ancestor - record says he came to America about 1653

Edmund Fanning - (son of Francis) - born 1620 -

married Ellen about -- 1649 from Ireland

Issue - 5 sons and - 2 daughters -

Edmund born in Ireland about 1651 - died about 1715 - married Margaret Billings

Margaret born in New London about 1652 - deceased April 1664

*Thomas born in Fisher Island about 1655 - married Frances Ellis

John born in Fisher Island about 1657

William born in Fisher Island about 1659 - killed by Indians at Poquchannach - no record more

James born in New London about 1663

Mary born in New London - April 28 1665 - married Ben ( ) -5 sons and 5 daughters

Notes - in this list above marked * refers to my mother's line - Eliza Ann Fanning - who married William Schenck 1823 or 1824 (NWSchenck)

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*Thomas Fanning - 3rd child and 2nd son of Edmund (Senior ) and Ellen -

Thomas died 27 April 1704

Born Fisher Island - 1655 - married Frances Ellis - Oct 19 1684-

Issue -Thomas born Stonington Conn - 27 April 1685

Frances born Stonington Conn - 19 Aug 1689 - married Timothy Van Pelt - Feb 1726

Catherine born Stonington Conn - 1692 - married Ranger - 2nd husband ( ) Page

*James born Stonington Conn - April 30 1695 - church records say 12 Aug 1694 - no doubt correct

Richard born Stonington Conn - June 9 1698

Thomas Senior served in the Narragansett War - received land for service

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*James Fanning - 2nd son and 4th child of Thomas Fanning and Frances Ellis - grandson of Edmund Senior - born Stonington Conn - he moved to Smithtown LI - in early life and became the sole progenitor of all the Long Island Fannings - who are many - died June 1779 age 84-

married in 1718 - Hannah Tooker Smith - born 1703 - died 10 Sept 1750 - 48th year. James born (not known) baptized 12 Aug 1694 at Stonington Conn-

Issue - 8 sons and 3 daughters -

James born Smithtown LI - 22 March 1719 - married Deborah Warner - 3 sons & 3 daughters

Thomas born Smithtown LI - 10 Nov 1722 - married Lydia Horton - 2 sons & 2 daughters

*Phineas born Smithtown LI - Aug 2 1724 - see his record - married M. Wells -

2nd marriage Mary Hubbard

William - twin - born Smithtown LI - Oct 26 1728 - married Mary Tazwell - s & d

An Episcopal Clergyman - ordained 10 March 1754 - London - England

Katharine - twin - born Smithtown LI - Oct 26 1728 (died in infancy - 11th Mar ?)

Bertha born Smithtown LI - died about 1775 - married Terry

Richard born Smithtown LI - 173 - died in 3rd year

Gilbert born Smithtown LI - 1733 - married Hildah Palmer - 10 sons and 2 daughters

Very distinguished family

Richard Born Smithtown LI - 1737 - moved to North Carolina - died 1773 - children died young-

little is known

Edmund - twin - born Southold - 24 April 1739 - later General Edmund - distinguished -

married Phoebe Maria Burns

Hannah - twin - born Southold - 24 April 1739 - married Jonathan Mc? - 31 Aug 1762 -

Distinguished.

James Fanning Senior married Feb 25 1752 - Thankful Hinckley Cheseborough - a widow for 2nd wife - daughter of Samuel and Martha ( ) Hinckley - born 22 March 1712 and died

Thankful had six children by Cheseborough marriage.

Capt. James Fanning took an active part in the French and Indian War -1746.

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*Phineas Fanning - 3rd son and 3rd child of Capt James Fanning and Mdse. Hannah Smith

Born Smithtown LI - 2 Aug 1724 - died 2 June 1796 - 71st year-

Married Mehitobel Wells - 12 January 1748 - daughter Solomon and Esther Wells -

born at Northville LI - Oct 7 1729 - died in her 49th year-

Issue -

*Phineas - born Franklinville LI - Laurel 6 Aug 1750

Esther - born Franklinville LI - 1752 - married Dec 1775 - William Brown - Shelter Island

Nathaniel - born Franklinville LI - 22 March 1755 - married Anna Wells - 6 sons & 4 daughters

Captain in Col. Fannings Kings American Regiment - also in NC - died in London - 1808

Barclay - born Franklinville LI -1757 - married Caroline Harrison Orne -4 sons and 2 daughters

William - born Franklinville LI -1764 - no record

Mehitobel - born Franklinville LI - 1770 - married Enoch Jagger - 2 sons and 1 daughter -

she died in her 29th year

Mehitobel Wells - father was a Judge at Northville LI - a man of piety and wealth and Grandson

of Rev. William Wells, Norwich - Eng.

The above Phineas is known as "Col. Phineas" - in early life he settled in Southold - now Laurel - built his homestead in 1762 - served in the French and Indian War 1746-47 - named a Lieut. In Capt. James Fanning's Company - 1st Battalion Foot - Justice of Peace 1763 -

At the time of was 1775 - between colonies and England - he held command as Col. Of Militia from King George III - was chosen Deputy to represent Suffolk Co. in the Provincial Convention called to elect members to the First Continental Congress in Philadelphia (meeting New York Convention).

These were troublesome times - the colonies now in rebellion - it seemed Col. Phineas

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wavered as to just which way to go - holding commission for the King - two of his brothers - Edmund and ( ) one son and many family kin on the Royal side - The Battle of Long Island came August 1776 and this event appears as the turning point for on July 8 1776 - he was appointed Muster Master to raise company for Suffolk Co - then on Aug 7 Congress ordered Gen. Wooster to send four companies to each end of LI - to guard stock and to be under command of Col. Fanning - again 29 August 1776 - Col. Smith dispatched Col. Fanning to be bearer of orders to them - relative to evacuation of Brooklyn. Record show Col. Fanning later remained at home - until peace came. In his younger days - was Captain of a ship and brought home many handsome things - kept open house and entertained a good style - greatly respected in his community and exerted a wide influence - member of Presbyterian church - Southold established Oct 1640.

For his 2nd wife married Mrs. Mary Hubbard with 3 children - married - 14 Feb 1779 - no issue - died 1806.

Col. Phineas died West Hampton LI - 2 June 1796 - buried at Jamesport. By his will 30 May 1796 - made provision to free his Negro slave "Cosmus" - Cosmus added to his name and became Cosmus Fanning. Lived on Shelter Island LI - where he died in 1831 - leaving a will in which he mentions wife Dido and daughter Julia.

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*Phineas - 1st son and 1st child of Col. Phineas and Mehitobel Wells -

Born Aquebogue LI - now Laurel - Aug 6 1750 - graduated at Yale College as AM in 1769 - studied law - moved to Nantucket Island - beginning Revolutionary War and lived all his days there and practiced ( )

Married 5 April 1777 - Keziah Coffin - born Nantucket - 5 Jan 1759 - daughter and only child of John and wife Keziah (Folger) Coffin. Keziah was 1st cousin to Benjamin Franklin, who (father of his mother), was a son - Jebbidiah Folger and grandson Peter Folger were colonist.

Issue-

John Coffin - born Nantucket 28 May 1778 - married Nancy Coffin - daughter of Capt Thaddeus

and Nancy Coffin

*William - born Nantucket - 25 April 1780 - see later account - Grandfather (by NW Schenck)

Hetty Wells - born Nantucket - 12 July 1782 - Daniel Wood

Caroline Matilda - born Nantucket - 9 June 1784 - (Ja? ) BrownWood

Thomas - born Nantucket - 12 Aug 1786 - known as Capt - never married - buried Charleston SC

Edmund - born Nantucket - 5 Dec 1790 - married Hester Lewis - 3 daughters - never married

Robert Barclay - born Nantucket - 10 Feb 1793 - married Phoebe Coleman Swain ( )

Phineas Wines - born Nantucket - 10 May 1799 - married Mrs. Emily (Janey May) Moore

Phineas died 21 Dec 1798 - 49 years - Keziah Coffin his wife - died 20 Nov 1820 - 62 yrs - buried Nantucket.

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John Coffin Fanning - 1st son and 1st child of Phineas Fanning and Keziah (Folger) Coffin

Born Nantucket 28 May 1778 - married Nancy Coffin - sept 22 1802

Followed the sea

Issue - Adaline - born 11 June 1805 - never married

He died at Grand Father's (his brother William's) home in New York - Brooklyn - 9 Sept 1819

Note by N.W.S. - Adaline Fanning - only child of John and Nancy - came to Wilmington NC in the '50's to visit her Uncle Phineas Wines - she stayed around among the relatives families - who were her 1st cousins - John C and Robert B. Wood - her Aunt Hetty and daughters Charlotte and Harriet and also her cousins Eliza Bunker Haines - Louisa Augusta Ferguson and others. Again while I was living on Court Street - Brooklyn LI - cousin Addie visited us in 1868 - 1872 as she was a frequent visitor to Brooklyn - having friends.

A maiden lady that was over 60 - a contemporary with my mother - spending many of her maiden days - 1820 and later with Mother and Aunt Ann at Grand Pa Fanning's in Brooklyn - 1811 and so on - said to have been handsome in her youth - she died Nantucket- 16 Oct 1877-72 yrs.

In remembrance to my wife - Mary Eliza - she willed her a handsome Amethyst breast pin - lozenge shaped - surrounded by brilliants - to my Mother and Aunt Ann - she left some property.

My elder sister - Adaline Fanning Bromley - was named for her - Great Uncle John C. Fanning (above) line - thus comes to and end - extinct- x

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*William Fanning (Nicholas W. Schenck's Grand Father)

Born Nantucket - Mass 25 April 1780

Married Nancy Rogers Simmons - New London Conn - (daughter Chapman and Elizabeth

Forsyth) - New York City - March 1803.

Issue - John Coffin - born New York City - 12 January 1804 - graduated Princeton - 1820-

Studied medicine - practiced - never married - died 9 March 1846 - Head of Profession- Monument in Greenwood

*Eliza Ann - born Brooklyn - NY ( ) Oct 1805

Ann Eliza - born Brooklyn NY - 25 January 1808 - married Charles Cable - Pokeepsie NY

He died in Brooklyn

Issue - Fanning - married Mary - d Melton River - died leaving one son and one daughter

William ( NY ) Mary lived with her father's cousin - Mrs. Johnson for years - never married -

Died - Adaline and Caroline Cable living in Brooklyn in 1904

Aunt Ann died 13 Aug 1898- 90 years - buried Greenwood Cemetery

William Augustus - born Brooklyn - 21 March 1810 - lived many years in Pokeepsie and died there.

Kezia Coffin - born Brooklyn - 9 April 1813 - died in infancy

Caroline Orne - born Brooklyn - 9 Feb 1816 - when a little girl - her right hand was so badly Bitten by a neighbor's dog - that amputation followed - this dreadful thing happened at her Grandfather Simmons house in New York City - she was educated for a teacher - followed it until her marriage - she resided one year or more with Uncle Phineas and taught school for young ladies in Wilmington NC - married Anton Metz (German) - 18 May 1856 and (Mary & I) were entertained for a day by them at Hoboken NJ on wedding trip - Nov 4/Dec 15 1858 - in her younger days she was handsome - died Brooklyn or New York City - July 1888 - no issue

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Thomas Chapman - born Brooklyn NY - Dec 19 1818 - married Elizabeth Lee - New Paltz NJ 10 Oct 1839

Issue- Thomas Augustus - born - Newburg NY - 1841 - died in infancy

Josephine -born- Newburg NY- 23 Sept 1842- married Rev. Joseph E. Denholm-Episcopal

Issue - Carrie Louise - born 5 July 1869 - married Fitzgerald - NJ lawyer

Anna Chandler - born - 19 Nov 1870 - married Wrightman

Hubert Alfred - born 9 Nov 1874

Mary Fay - born 12 April 1883

Note by N.W.S. - Uncle Tom - followed same business as his father and brother (? )(rope making). After he kept hotel at New burg NY - later in the 50's came to Wilmington NC - with wife Aunt Lib and cousin Josie - made first home with Uncle Phineas - later opened and operated the "Carolina Hotel" in partnership with his cousin Robert B. Wood - for some years and returned North and then took up dancing. Visited me - spending the winter of 1881 - dancing school I visited him where he lived in Newburg in 1849 and in 1866/71 and 1885/1896 - when living in Brooklyn - was a frequent visitor - often spending several days. Uncle Tom was very kind to "Mary" - in attention and gifts - as also to all my children - having instructed them in dancing and graceful deportment.

In his later years and during my last stay in Brooklyn - up to 1896 - I helped him in many ways - chiefly by securing him a (?hall room) - so that he could continue his now reduced classes and in this way help him - to help himself - by my paying rent. He had his faults and I do not excuse them - I draw the curtain of silence over them - hoping his soul is at peace - he died hospital NY- 26 June 1897 - buried Pokeepsie NY.

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Edmund - 8th child of William and Nancy Fanning - born 14 Jan 1823 - d - in infancy

Grandfather William Fanning died Sept 29 1861 - buried in cemetery near Harlem NY

Grandmother Nancy Simmons Fanning - died Sept 12 1861 - buried in Pokeepsie NY

Note by N.W.S. - I (NWS) visited Brooklyn 1849 and also at Pokeepsie - to visit my kin folks - Uncle William Augustus and wife Keziah - Aunt Ann Cable and husband Charles - this is my first recollection of seeing my maternal grandparents and aunts and uncles and many cousins - Isabella - Emilie - Robert B. - Schenck - Fanning - Mary - Aunt Ann Cable and also Aunt Phoebe

widow of Robert B. Fanning and her daughter Rebecca - Grandfather Fanning - then about 69 years old - small man in flesh and statue - say 5ft 6 inches - quick and nervous in action - incessant talker - Grandmother looked the old lady - active and always urging one to have something to eat. I stayed at different points and place - May to Nov 1849 - and returned to Wilmington NC - coming home by sea and bringing sister Aletta Jane with me - in one Jonas Smith Packet - Capt. George (Burrlier) - we made the run in 3 days - fair wind and good breeze all down the coast. Visiting Brooklyn and Canarsie at later dates - 1852 - 1854- 1856 - - I also visited and spent many happy days with kin folks in Pokeepsie - part of the time staying with my married sister Aletta and Dr. Jno. R. Cooper - I assisted Uncle William Fanning in posting his books - working bills and etc - also on wedding trip Nov and Dec 1858 visited Pokeepsie and stayed at homes of Uncle W.A. Fanning and Rev. Dr. Jno. Cooper and also entertained by other kin folks.

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William Augustus Fanning - 4th child and 2nd son of William Fanning and Nancy Simmons

Born Brooklyn LI - March 21 1810

Married 1st wife Mary Daniels - Sandy Hill - New York - died 1834 - Pokeepsie

Issue - Isabella - born Dec 8 1832 - unmarried - died 10 April 1876 - 42 yrs- A charming girl - visited Wilmington NC in 1847 - much beloved and honored in Pokeepsie

For 2nd wife William A. married Kezia Coffin - on 23 July 1837 - she was daughter of Robert Barclay Fanning and Phoebe Swain - therefore his cousin - Kezia born Oct 26 1819

Issue - Emilie Wood - born May 14 1838 - married Harry Howard - 1 son - Frank B.

born Dec 9 1871

William Schenck - born 1839 - died in his fifth year

Robert Barclay - born Dec 25 1840 - studied law - of much promise -

died - 18 Nov 1862 - unmarried

Augustus Schenck - born 26 Nov 1844 - married Mary Ellen Morgan - 28 May 1884

Issue - Frederick - born 31 Dec 1885 - always lived in Pokeepsie

Edmund - born 15 Aug 1848 - died young

Willie - born 9 Oct 1854 - died 14th year

Perry - born 1858 - died young -

Note by N.W.S. - There never lived a kinder hearted or more charitable man than William A. Fanning. Everyone who has lived in Pokeepsie NY from 1835 to his death 14 Jan 1887 - knew "Bill Fanning". He was Chairman Board of Health and done much service and gave much relief to the sufferers from the cholera epidemic in 1849. Country Clerk Dutchess Co - 2 terms - an estimable citizen - fast and fun friend - always helpful to the needy - highly respected - honored and beloved - one of the "salt of the earth". He will have his reward - Aunt Kezia always love and kindness to me.

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*My Mother - Eliza Ann - 1st daughter and 2nd child of William Fanning born 1750 - and Nancy Simmons

My Mother Eliza Ann Fanning was born at Brooklyn NY - 4 Oct 1805 Married William Schenck - merchant of Brooklyn - 1824

Issue- Adaline Fanning Schenck - born Brooklyn NY - 25 Jan 1825 - died Brooklyn 1910

Aletta Jane Schenck - born Brooklyn NY (I think July) 1827 - died Brooklyn March 23 1906

Nicholas William Schenck - born Brooklyn NY - 8 Jan 1830

Note NWS - My mother resided in Brooklyn - late May 1836 - my father (William) - died 15 March 1832. In May 1836 - we (mother - sister and I) took passage for Wilmington NC as had been arranged to live with our Uncle Phineas Wines Fanning - brother to my Grandfather William Fanning. There my sister lived until 1840 - when they went to Pokeepsie - to go to school. Mother went to Pokeepsie NY - in 1852 and lived in Pokeepsie and Brooklyn the remainder of her life - died 105 2nd Place - Brooklyn LI - Dec 21 1884.

Note NWS - William Schenck - (my father) - son of Nicholas Schenck and Aletta ( ) born at Canarsie LI - 20th Aug 1797 - moved to Brooklyn - carried on business in Fulton Street - North side - just opposite with Henry Street Commons - married and died - see record above. At my age - could have no recollection of my father - his miniature - in possession sister Adeline Bromley.

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Note NWS - My sister Adaline Fanning - named for cousin Adaline - daughter John Coffin Fanning - 1st child Eliza Ann Fanning and William Schenck - born 25 Jan 1825. Went to Wilmington NC - May 1836 - with family - lived with Uncle Phineas - later coming to Pokeepsie about 1841 - resided with Uncle William A. and Aunt Kezia Fanning - attended seminary- Doc and Prof Wright - after completion of education - went to Canarsie LI and lived with Grandmother Aletta ( ) Schenck. Married Isaac WR (Bromley) lawyer - widower with 2 children - Miles S. and Margaret - 4th Oct 1854 - at cousin Ann ( ) house - in Brooklyn.

Died Jan 11 1910 at 105 2nd Place - Brooklyn NY.

Issue - John Schenck - died in infancy

Frances Pearsall - born 1856 - died Dec 29 1939 - buried Greenwood Cemetery- Brooklyn

Edmund Pearsall - born 1860 - died 1936

IWR Bromley - born Plattesburg NY - 5 July 1806 - his first wife was Standish

Issue - Miles Standish Bromley - born - Married - Margaret - daughter - Rev and _______ Kisiani of Schenectady NY - who was the only sister of the wife of William H. Vanderbilt - son of Cornelius (Senior) - no issue

Margaret - born - Married - Charles Greene of Providence RI

No issue - She died suddenly in 1904 - from fright - from automobile - in the street - Providence RI

IWRB - died in Brooklyn 1892 - buried "Greenwood"

Frances P and Edward P were named for the Pearsall family of New York - being clients of IWRB - for said names - there children then - came into a good legacy - from Pearsall family - Edmund P went with Morgan and CO. - New York office - when a lad and is now head official of the Financial departments (Nov 1905).

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Note by NWS-

My sister Aletta Jane Schenck - 2nd child and daughter - William Schenck and Eliza Ann Fanning - born - Brooklyn NY - July 1827 - lived in Wilmington NC with mother and Uncle Phineas Fanning 1836-1841 - came to Pokeepsie - to finish education - lived with Uncle William A. and Kezia Fanning - graduated at Prof. Wright Academy - them came to Canarsie LI - lived with Grandmother Aletta Remseaur Schenck.

Aletta Jane was named for her father William Schenck's mother Aletta and the Jane was for Jane ( ) Remseaur - mother of Aletta Schenck and wife of Anthony Remseaur - she lived at Canarsie LI and Brooklyn - till her marriage to Dr. Jno. Reed Cooper in 1853 - at the Brooklyn residence of cousin Ann ( ) whose mother was great-grand daughter- Nicholas Schenck niece - named Hettie - daughter of John - went to Pokeepsie at once - Dr. Jno. R. Cooper - in medical practice with his father - resided there till JR death in 1891 - in his 63 yr - (only one son)

Issue - William Schenck Cooper - born about 1854 or 1855

Sister Aletta died March 23 1906 - Schenk - Cooper - buried - "Greenwood" Cemetery - Brooklyn NY.

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Nicholas W. Schenck - only son of William Schenck and Eliza Ann Fanning -

(died May 12 1916 - buried in Oakdale Cemetery - Wilmington NC)

Born 8 Jan 1830 - Brooklyn New York - North side of Fulton Street - opposite Henry Street- (building replaced by David C. Cooper - brick building)-

Father William died 15 March 1832 - as arranged went to Wilmington North Carolina - in May 1836 - by sea (Schooner Charles E. Thom) - Capt. Sanford - with mother and sister - (stayed at first with Jno .M and Zara Cazaux - friends of Uncle PW Fanning) - to live with my great Uncle Phineas Wines Fanning - younger brother of my grandfather William Fanning. Uncle Phineas soon provided a house - on Orange Street - south side - between 2nd and 3rd Street - and I lived with him - till about 1852.

First school - Miss Laura Rankin - later Rothwell - schoolhouse in (1838) Northrop Alley - School for children and more advanced scholars - girls 10/15 - boys 12/16 - of the young ladies as then - I recall in names and appearance (now 1905) - Misses Augusta Law - Clarissa and Caroline Northup - Frances Lippitt - Sarah and Mary Savage - my sister - Caroline Van Viel - Emily Howard - Susan - Martha and Sarah Black - Sarah Peck - of bigger boys - George Harris - Mike Cronley - Eli Hall - Spicer boys and others - Miss Laura from my memory was too strict and sometimes cruel - whippings abundant. My seat was in a sort of crib in the middle of the room - prayers every morning and singing - I recall a verse - as it still sounds in my ears - "While I live - I do not think - I will ever learn to drink - Brandy - Whiskey - Gin or Rum - or anything to make drunk come". Washington Temperance Society - in full blast those days - may explain the song.

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Not many years at Miss Laura School - too bad in the way of mischief - Jess Mulock - Orange - New York - comes on the scene - proposes to open a school for boys - Uncle Phineas soon took up with Mulock - coached him and gave every assistance - of course - Nick was enrolled at Mulocks - I must have been well advanced for my years - as I at once commenced - "Smith Arithmetic" -"Smith Geography" -"State" - books bought of Wright and Savage - (1839) - then store north side Market Street - few room from Front - Jas. T. Burr clerk there - School room - 1 story wooden house - on site now occupied by Burr and Bailey store - Front Street - moved across the street - in home north side of alley - moved again to rooms that had been occupied by Wilmington Advertiser Newspaper - (Fred C. Hill - Edenton) - over George R. French shoe store - south side Market Street. The school entrance was by an alley - out of Front Street - between Dr. John D. Bellamy office and William Destract bake shop and opposite Isaac Gilliam (Negro) cleaning shop. I was one of Mulock Scholars from first to last - the entire years he taught in Wilmington - and about from 1837 - 1845. "Jesse Mulock" was a model teacher - strict -firm - disciplinary - at same time patient - helpful - long suffering with dull boys and if there was anything in a boy - Mulock would find it and put the polish on it. "Learn you must" -"study you must" - "be diligent". As has come over from the ages - "spare the rod and spoil the boy" - found it full of significance for dunces and bad boys - Mulock's big bunch of seasoned Chinquapin switches - 3 feet long - that was always left in stock for handy use - when needed. Mulock being ambidextrous and powerful could play the bunch to advantage - no boy ever conquered Jesse Mulock - x

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The Odd Fellows Society started a school - next to City Hall (later Meginny) - with M. Laughlin teacher and at a low rate of tuition and same fee - drove Mulock from the field - he went with merchandising - and had Richard Langdon and A.D. Cazaux for clerks - finally went to New York - was engaged in one of the Bible Houses - lived to an old age and died in Orange NY - peace to his ashes.

I went into Uncle paint store and clerked - later went 1 year to school in Classical Department of the Odd Fellows School - (L. Meginny - Principal). Robert Lindsay - classical teacher - the boys in my class (1847) - Owen Fennel - John McLaurin - Robert B. McRae - Sidney G. Law - in the afternoons we recited with the young ladies of Miss Richardson Class - in the higher branches - forming one class - (Lindsay instructor). I recall Caroline and Margaret McRae - Jane London - Julia Savage - Emma Ballard - Hoskins sisters (2) - Bryan sisters (2) - Harriet Hawthorn - Annie Wade - _______________-in all some 20 (15-18 yrs) old.

Lindsay went to Tarboro as Principal of Academy and sent for me Oct 1848 to come and assist him in the Primary Department - I went and boarded with George Howard and family - 3 sons and 5 daughters. Howard kept house - table board only - I was only border - had good room

fire when called for - lights - washing and mending - boy to wait on me - most excellent table - fine cooking - old style - a super abundance of good things - paid $8.00 for month - (eight dollars for month) - excellent society. The old fashioned chills and fever got into my system - Dr. William G. Thomas ( )Wilmington- lived in Tarboro and he ordered my going home - believing change would cure. Uncle and Mother decided to send me North - hence in May 1849 -with Ezra (wife) Wood and 2 babies - took passage in vessel - after a sea-sick voyage - landed at Jonathan Schenck ( ) store and house No. 23 Fulton Drive - Brooklyn - Cousin Ann ( )

(maiden) keeping home upstairs - There I stayed - until cousin Schenck brought over and introduced Dominicus Van de Veer - (a beau of Adaline's)-

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who kindly drove me to Canarsie LI- where I met Grandmother Aletta and Uncle James Schenck and my sisters - Van de Veer and I had planned to see if they recognize me - as we drove into the barn - (about 4 PM) sisters and Lucretia Schenck were coming out of the house to walk over to Aunt Annie's (Jere and Richard?) Schenck's mother - I was introduced as Mr. Smith from New York City - we all passed into the fields - over to Aunt Annie's and returned to the house - in all over an hour. As Van de Veer was preparing to leave soon - at proper time - I made myself known - the surprise and welcome cannot be described.

Spending some time here - to Brooklyn and New York often - visiting Pokeepsie - Newburg and other places - saw all my kin - returned to Wilmington in November 1849. Clerked in Uncle's store and afterward when he turned his business over to Jonathan A. Parker. Parker was a boy raised by Uncle Phineas - he prepared me to keep his books and mail his letters - he would give me a good furnished room in his home and my board - I became very tired and lonesome living with Uncle (since Mother had gone North) - a bachelor quarters - seldom met Uncle at any meal - he had no regular hours - any time and no time. We had a colored cook and a boy that follow Uncle - foot to foot - and as for messenger - so consulting Uncle and he agreeing - I went to Parker and lived till married Nov 1858-

Uncle Phineas had a great fancy for taking poor boys (orphans) - to learn his trade (painting) and sent them to night school - in his time he has reared and had 20 apprentices - Parker married a Miss Almay from Wayne County. Mrs. Parker (Margaret) graduated St. Mary's - Raleigh - and her mother had some means - stranger things have happened - than her marrying Parker - some things we can't account for - now Parker was a plain - ordinary - good sort of a fellow - industrious - but he had few opportunities. Any way - I was soon in favor with Mrs. Parker and her mother - and through many years -

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I enjoyed their hospitality - nothing but kindness came to me. In 1852 I went to clerk and as book keeper and confidential man - with George Myers - groceries - liquors - cigars and millenary - at stand now held by Jno. Boatwright - 1st year salary 800 dollars - my opportunity for saving money was good - for my living was nominal - board costing me - nothing in money. It's the same old story - with all young people - money spent as fast as made - but mind - one thing - "Never in Debt" - always had some money on hand - and ahead. Remained with Myers till 1856 - traveled Brooklyn - New York again - 1851- 1854

1856 - spending 6 to 16 weeks - at time - always went by rail and bag line - coming home in 1856 - went with B&D again - as packet clerk - before this however in 1852 - I was 6 months with J.C. and R. B. Wood (my cousins) - as Cousin John showed by his conduct - I was in his way - Cousin Robert desired me to continue - but I quit - and never received a dime for my services - then I was short time - 4 mos with David Carthwell (Com. Merchant) - years after I made claim on him for my services - he wrote me he was "poor" and could not then pay - acknowledged the debt - so I released him and forgave the claim.

(From side of page 22)

In New York - Nov 1851 - witnessed the Kossuth demonstration with Cousin Robert B. Wood and Henry A. Haines - afterward we went to Pokeepsie and visited Uncle William and Aunt Kezia Fanning and Phoebe.

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These were my young days - 1840 - 1857 - days of frolic - dancing - "The Wild Oat Days" -so called and as all young fellows - I sowed my oats - and left them - days of going to see the "girls" "dancing school"- "sound parties" - "house frolics" - "moonlight excursions" - "serenades" and "music" - everything contributing to pleasure - spending money in dress - good clothes - candy and flowers - all fun calls for money - so it was spent. Then came the attraction of the beautiful girl - love - courtship - and the successful climax in marriage to Mary Eliza Morris - eldest daughter Richard Morris and Johanna Yonges - Nov 3 1858 at St. James Episcopal Church -

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2PM - Rev. Robert Bent Drane - DI - officiating. Many invites given (600) and hence covered church. Cousin Jo Nixon and Chas W. Morris assisted - train for New York via W & W RR at 3 PM - friends and kin at depot. Cousin Jane Bradley - who was very fond of Mary - have assisted best very maternally in making dresses and other outfits - during the summer of 1848 - Mary spending much time there - with daughters - Amoret and Eliza - took occasion to give me - privately some motherly advice and caution - as to new conditions - not to be {mentioned/repeated} here.

Arrived NY - St. Nicholas Hotel - 3 days and then by steamer to Pokeepsie - to stay at Dr. Jno. Cooper (sister Aletta and mother) - Willie was a little boy - I should think about 4 yrs old - which places his birth in 1854 and hence I think Aletta was married fall 1853 and not 1855 (as Books record has it - in "History Fanning Family"). Remained North Nov and until Dec 15 - visiting Brooklyn and Pokeepsie kin - returned home and lived - as insisted by Mr. Morris - in house - SE corner Dock and Front St - Wilmington - NC until October 1 -1859 - then went to housekeeping on Market Street - between 7th and 8th - sout side - next to Joseph Burr and west of Charles D. Myers - who had married Lassie DeRosset - same week - furniture - sister Aletta had purchased in NY and sent out by vessel - same week - Harriett C. Hawthorn (my cousin) married N. Green Daniel 12 O'clock same day (by Dr. Drane) - Lassie DeRosset marries Charles D. Myers - later in week Col. Edward Dudley Hall marries Lunnie Green - youngest daughter Joseph Swann Green, Esq - date of November 3rd - 1858. ( )

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Minnie Cooper - was born at home of the Morris' - in house SE corner Dock and Front Street - known as the Mrs. Joe Hill house - about 2 AM - early morning August 1 1859 - Dr. Joseph H. Dickson officiating- Mary could not suckle the Babe - so after every experiment of - pump - ( ) - and other woman's devices - the wet nurse had to come - Mrs. Warren - (daughter old Mrs. Stewart) - came daily and gave the essential nourishment - until I was able to procure - a black girl - Eliza by name - a young genuine Negro girl - of about 20 yrs old - who had lost her child - for this service - I paid Fred. J. Lord - "20 - dollars for month" - for nearly 1 years - who was owner of the slave Eliza - Eliza had a fine physique- splendid teeth - of the genuine black in color - under Mary's orders - she bathed daily - also cleaned her teeth - hair cut close - and in every way - clean - neat - good dresses and clothes came provided - and Eliza became - as one of the family - for cook - we had - Aunt Phillis - slave of Aunt Davis - paid Aunt Davis "$100 - for year" - old Abram - her husband who stayed on the lot and was fed.- Phillis - excellent cook - neat and industrious servant - so housekeeping run smooth - I had the entire inside painted and ( ) - all new furniture - Happy hours - blessed our house -

I fell out with Cazaux - about a matter - and left his employment - Dec 29th - Alva Burr - an old friend and dear - who with his parents and sisters and brothers - then lived corner 8th and Market - died Dec 31 - 1859 - buried in Oakdale - I was one of the pallbearers - he was 8 yrs my senior - Alva -(or Prince as called) was book keeper for DeRosset and Brown - on morning Jan 2nd - 1860 - Jim Telfair (Negro porter) for DeRosset and Brown - came to house with this message to me-

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"Mass' Armand sends his compliments and asks for Mr. Schenck - to call at the office - this morning immediately after his breakfast" - we were at the breakfast table - I told Mary - and she asked me - what will you do - my reply "I will call - but don't think I will take Burr's place - as I think that is what Dr. DeRosset wants" - Mary said "Why" - "Fear I am not competent - as Alva Burr - was one of the best book keepers - DeRosset and Brown are particular - hard to please - I fear - and the work is heavy" - after awhile - Mary said - "you are out of employment - you are fully competent and now for my sake accept - and make the trial"- meal over - made ready to start - kissed Mary (as my rule and custom was always to kiss and embrace her on my coming home and my going to business) The parting promise to her was -"I will accept the place" - Interview the Dr. (private office of DeRosset and Brown) after expressing my fears and incompetency - Dr. DeRosset said - "I sent for you - because Mr. Burr had recommended you - we want a man - who can keep silence and we have no fears as to your ability - I will help you and show you ways on Mr. Burr's method - all I ask of you is to try"-

I said I would "try" - DeRosset replied "( ) pay will be (1500 per year) and increase - when can you begin?" - He replied - "Come tomorrow morning at 8 AM" -

Return home - Mary rejoiced and happy and spent the day at home - Mary and baby Minnie -

Commenced with DeRosset and Brown - January 2 - 1860 - and I may here - say - I was fully satisfied - pleased my employers - made lifetime and warm friends of Dr. AJ DeRosset and R. Frank Brown - as I am sure from their offers of assistance - recommendations - and an event with Mr. Frank Brown - in 1865 - will fully prove. Told in another place.

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Resigned from DeRosset and Brown employment - by reason of the approaching war - May - 1861 - against strong protest from Mr. Frank Brown. Nothing doing and ( ) dull - did not want to take pay and no work -

Lyda - Eliza Fanning named for my mother - was born September 19 1860 - at house of grand parents Richard and Johanna Morris (known after as "St. James House" - situated beyond 8th Street and then just outside town limits) about 3 PM - word was brought to me - at DeRosset and Brown - office - Mary had no trouble - and hence nursed Lyda - moved in November to house - SW - corner of Chestnut and 8th (as ? Hansley - went back on his word of honor and raised the rent $50.00 additional - on his Market Street house - after I had expended fully 100 dollars of my money to clean it up and make improvements) -

Hence my move - rented new quarters from Luke Huggins at $150.00 for year - "Phillis" continued as cook - we had a lot - 70 x 360 - garden and plenty chickens. I had a neighbor - who feasted on my stock - as he cut a hole in his fence - and enticed them in and slew - then again - we had borrowers - here is one instance out of many - servant comes and says "Old Miss - send her compliments - and ask you how I'm is today - and how is Mass Nick - and the children" "Miss Minnie and Miss Lyda - and ask you - if you please wont lend her - a ham for dinner and if you aint got a ham - please send her a pair of fowls" - Mary - would almost always - lend - as Phillis told me - "Mass Nick - if you don't stop Miss Mary she will lend all you got - and break you" - This time however - no hams in house - and Mary sent excuse - "Mr Schenck would not allow the chickens killed for his own table" - However this didn't stop - the borrowing from same party as it continued and we had many messages - while at sound (1865) - Mrs. Morris once had occasion to send all the biscuits- off the breakfast table - when some old servant - came with - "Compliments to ( )" this morning was - so very common - every day also - servant came -

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War aloud began to arise - over the South - Finally commerce and mail were suspended - business dead - hence I notified Dr. DeRosset - that I would resign and stop - Doctor son Louis came home from New York - Dr. Jonathan home - Armand who and all his sons at home - dull was no name for the times - so far as business goes - Mr. Brown opposed my idea said the war would be over in 90 days - and things would be restored - he said to me - "If we choose to pay you - to do nothing - what matters - I want you to stay - reminded me I had family and said what will you do" - As it was - I left them in May 1861 - spent a week holiday at Burr's place on sound - with Charles Burr and Charles Morris - Sumter was fired on - North Carolina agreed to stay in the Union and soon after changed and want out - "seceded"-

Gov. Ellis called out soldiers - forts taken and defenses begun - Henry M. Drane - was appointed - A.C.S. - by Gov. Ellis and he employed me to assist him - Drane said - "Nick - I can only give you the lowest place in my office - pay 50 as mo. Ration - the War was on - troops raised and some fighting later - "Bethel" - "Bull Run" and so on -

Yellow fever - was brought to Wilmington NC by Blockade Runner steamer Kate - who landed 2 sick seamen - below Kidders Mill - they died and the Negroes - who nursed those sailors died - this was in early July - 1862 - There was no word of yellow fever - no knowledge or apprehension - though later it was known to exist and a week ( ) several mysterious cases of Death - yet no fear or thought of this dread disease - until Heyer - brother of Jonathan C. Heyer - died suddenly in late August or September - when Doctors Dickson and Thomas - medical record and the faculty - pronounced that Heyer had - black vomit - the dread news - soon spread - quarantine put on -

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and soon - a panic to get away - citizens and family - going in all directions - Fayetteville - (Sumter) - the sound - Smithville - Clinton and every point - general sanitary measures commenced - a general clean-up - use of disinfectant - burning of tar barrels in the street - spreading lime - Every body - who could get away - left town - I being in the Army - obtained furlough - with Mary - Minnie - Lyda - (Richard - who was born Feb 15 1862) - left Wilmington NC in 3 PM for Clinton - via Warsaw - Arrangements by letter had been made with Rev. George M. Gibbs (cousin George) - he wrote -"come - will do best we can for you"-

Arrived at Warsaw - about dark - every hotel quarantined against us - coming from Wilmington - fortunately Dr. William Harris and family was at Warsaw and he very kindly - got William Powell of Clinton - who was going home that night - to take us in his carriage - a drive of 12 miles or more - we arrived safe and sound at Cousin George and ( ) house - about midnight-

I remained 10 days and returned to Wilmington N.C. - to find almost a deserted town - stopped over night on my return - with "Southerland" - a friend at Warsaw and came in train next day with- only S.D. Wallace - President of W&W RR and Sam Potter - none others - travel cut off- Sam left train at Smith's Creek - walked over to G.J. Hill's place and took boat (canoe) for his home on North West River -

Arrived in Wilmington NC about 11 O'clock AM - every house on Front Street - closed and shut-up - did not met or see a soul - till coming to head of Market - in a group - stood - Capt. Maffitt - Tobe Lucas and Jake Kezier - I made for the Commissary office - were I found Capt. Drane - Charles Haines - Daniel Haines and James Lippitt - (William ( ) in Fayetteville) -

lodged with Haines and Haines - at - Jesse Bowden's house NE corner - Princess and 4th Streets - Daniel Haines had the yellow fever there - I nursed him for 2 weeks - until help came - Haines had gotten permission - to go into the country - and did not return - Capt Drane lived with his father (Rev. R.B. Drane) at the Rectory - Market Street - where later Dr. Drane died - At another time I will detail about the fever.

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Richard (1st son) died of croup - at Clinton NC (buried there) - April 10 -1863 - about 14 mos old - This sad event called me to Clinton - where I remained 12 days - at this time living with Cousin George Gibbs - were his wife - 2 daughters - 2 sons - Aunt Susan Fleming - maiden lady - Josie Church Gibbs and one child - boy (died there later) - Robert Morgan - brother to Mrs. Gibbs - Mary and 2 children - besides 2 young girl boarders - at school ( )-

Adam Empie Gibbs - then living at Burr's home - sound place - (Greenville Sound) - making salt - which exempted him from military service - as also - he had a friend at Raleigh - in person of Col. Peter Mallett - (his brother - in - law) head of NC (Conscription) Bureau -

"Yellow Fever" subsided in Wilmington - as we had - Ice - freeze and heavy frost on morning 8 November - 1862 - I had passed through the fever - in Oct and Nov - 1862 - and recovered - as also had Uncle Phineas and Dan Haines - (more of particulars - in Yellow Fever Epidemic 1862 - see in another place) - At this date I was convalescing.

Lt. Col Charles E. Thorburn - C.S.A. - occupied my house - as furnished - most of 1863 - as Mary and children remained in Clinton - for the time and I brought them to Wilmington - in Oct 1863 - and we lodged with Uncle P.W.F. - in the T.W. Brown house on Orange Street - before Christmas we moved to our own quarters - Mrs Thorburn later going to Richmond - This house - was the Capt. C.D. Ellis house - his son-in-law - Henry Russell - had lived there and died 1859- situated on Church Street - near Mr. Morris - we moved there - early on in 1861 - as Capt Ellis offered me the house at a sacrifice rent ($100)-because as he said he wanted me for the care I would take of the property and because his daughters (3) and wife and himself - wished us for neighbors - (friends of Mary).

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