Nicholas W. Schenck Diary — Section 3 of 5 (prev/next) 
Page 60

The "Granger Place" - on Masonboro Sound was isolated - nearest neighbor - 600 yards or more - so it was "go as you please" - my daughter Daisy was there some times - afterwards went to Cousin Lee Wright - Wrightsville Sound - (4 miles away) - having a good bateau boat - with the children - our daily sport was collecting oysters or crabbing - by line or net - along shore - result from memoranda kept - for the season - we collected "75 Bar Oysters" and caught over 2000 hard crabs - These were all eaten and through jolly and fair oyster roasts and crab salad - fried crabs - crab omelettes - fully taste feast - In fall of year - we had sea bird also - then the fine bathing - take it all in all - there is as much "good in Life" to be found at the "sounds"- in "Old North Carolina" - as any spot on God's Green Earth - Amen!- I could live like a "Prince" and die as a "Christian" - at the good old sound-

About 5th Nov - 1897 left sound - rainy day - spent a day or so at Aunt Julia's and Kate Hill - Wil. NC - telegraph from Eliza Haughton - we left for Spartanburg SC and remained there till Sept 1898 - on invitation from Emilie Vaughan - we visited Asheville NC - (her home Forest Hill) - between Asheville and Biltmore NC - Lady Emilie insisted on our staying - she went North - with Miss Bennett in Nov and did not return till Christmas - Annie and I run Forest Hill for 6 weeks - and left there Dec 18 - 1898 - for Spartanburg- we had a most delightful visit - Emilie V. - had house full - at one time over 40 boarders - finally it grew less and less - until only 6 - we left house in charge of her girl "Eliza" - we paid all bills and left our statement - remained with Eliza dn WSH - till following July - went to Wilmington NC and stayed with Aunt Kate Hill (McKee House) - Aunt Julia now dead -

In August - Annie had operation for what Dr. B - had decided as "cancer in left breast" - In Oct. - moved and lived with Julia Harrison on Princess Street - near 5th - On July 23rd 1900 - moved to Wrightsville Sound (WAW Jr. Place) - old London house for quarters - remained till Oct 23/ 1900- spent most delightful 3 months - and received every attention from William Augustus and Cousin Lee - went to town on Nov 9th - Annie left for Charlottesville -Va. via Richmond -(Lyt M? met Annie in Richmond) - As I had work in Wil. NC first with Cousin Jno. Hill Brown and later with Morton and Co (Jesse Welder) - I did not go with Annie - while my pay was very small $6.25 for week - it paid our living expenses and was better than being idle - A part of the time at Spartanburg SC - we kept joint housekeeping with Eliza and WSH - at Wilmington with Aunt Kate - my share of expenses - was to pay for the living (provisions) - Annie made same arrangement with sister Julia H and I paid living (food and wood) expenses-

Page 61

Sept. 1898 I and Annie in Asheville N.C.- Annie began in Nov - to complain of a pain in her breast- and so on from time to time. At Eliza - later on - Eliza desired to call in Dr. Nott - and was anxious to do so- however Annie was very decidedly opposed - and so nothing was done- July - after we reached Wilmington NC - I fully decided to call in Dr. Tho. S. Burbank - after much persuasion Annie consented and examination was made - The next day - I called on Dr. B. at his office - as he had - just then - phone message "to go to sound" - Dr. B - invited me to go with him - so I accepted - on our way down - the matter of Annie's troubles was further gone into - Dr. B.'s - conclusion - that this lump in Annie's breast - was a "cancer" - commonly known as "Rose Cancer" - firm fact - that in time - if allowed to remain - the lump would grow and grow - finally come through the skin - and later on present the appearance of a full bloom red rose - with this comes intense pain and always extreme offensiveness - hence he advised -"an operation at once" - this was serious and alarming.

It became my painful duty - to break this news to Annie and to urge an operation as soon as possible - you may depend on it - she opposed everything - and never would submit to the knife - finally she surrender and in a few days preparations being made- 7 Dr. arrived - about 11 AM - those few hours - (11 to 2) are too full of sadness for me to relate - the "fears of Annie" and the trying ordeal - she stood the operation well and was comfortable in bed by 2:30 - Annie Walters (Jos. Walters) beloved wife - was present in the room all the time - and her kindness and good part then and afterwards - will always be remembered by me - with professed gratitude and loving remembrance- Dr. B. - made excuse to send me away and kept me out - so soon as Annie had passed under the effects of the anesthetic - Annie's health - being most excellent - her recovery came rapidly and save from the cancer she appeared as well as ever - there was no later offensiveness - I dressed her hounds and the place - twice daily- entire healing did not come - two small pimples came - and Dr. B. - later removed - then appeared evidence of small risings under the skin - then came intense pain - in left arm - but this pain only came - about 4 AM and so for 2 to 2 hours - it was continue - generally by 7 AM - the pain had gone - and no more that day - till following day - and coming near same hour in the very early morning - (4 AM) - There could be found no relief for this - Dr. prescribed -"morphine" - so as to

Page 62

produce sleep - and to act so as to meet the hour - thus hoping to bring relief - sometimes it helped and some times not - I left Wil. NC - Saturday 7 PM - Dec 22 - 1900 - for Charlottesville - Va. - pressed ( )in Richmond next morning - left Richmond 3 PM Sunday - arrived at C. - about 8 PM - Lyt met me at station - in rain storm - Dec 23 - 1900 -

I realized Annie had failed and was failing - while the "place" - on breast was no more - there had come many "blotches"on her skin - too sure evidence that the disease had entered her blood - then she was annoyed by "shortness" of breath - even slow walking was tiresome. Her appetite was good - and she was cheerful - was with others - we played - "set back" - "whist" - "hearts" and every night of the week - seldom retiring before 10 PM- Annie's condition soon determined me - "to remain and nurse and care for her"- so I wrote Jesse Wilder and resigned my place - Dec 24 - 1900 - Monday - on invitation we (Lyt - Alice -Annie and I) took train for Geo. Macon - to spend Christmas - arrived at Keswick Depot by rail near noon - carriage took us in to George Macon's home - 2 miles from Keswick - (C&O RR) Depot - Christmas day we had old time "eggnog" - stayed 3 days and returned to C - Annie was up to ride often - but I could see was failing - Day by Day passed - Sunday Feb 17 - 1901 - Alice took Annie to ride - Lyt and I went to Grace Church - Rev. Lee - home near 1 PM - Alice and Annie soon return - Monday came - Annie not resting so well Sunday night - I persuaded her to remain - abed - so she did breakfast at bedside - about or near 10:30 Annie had bad turn - kind of faint - she did not seem to realize what had passed when - I tried to explain and letting her - she had had serious attack and I fear she could not survive another - however she recovered and seemed as usual - Rev. Wm. Lee called after 12 and we had "Communion" - present "Annie - Alice - Lyt and I" - a very solemn occasion - prayers, etc - Annie went to bed - but did not complain and seemed as usual - Dr. Macon - had been in several times - he was apprehensive and said anything may happen - while Annie rested (2 to 4 PM) I wrote letter to Owen and - Eliza - I feared conclusions - Annie had awoke and was talking - Alice in and out - Just after 5 PM - I went to bed and Annie was sitting up - made no complaint and talked as usual - later on she expressed desire - to get up - I advised her staying - abed - later she said - "I must get up" - and with this made an effort - turning herself around and placing her feet on the floor - she started to rise up - I placed my arms under her to help - and she made the effort to arise - when I felt her wight - as she seemed to give way-

Page 63

and at same time - she said - "I faint" - just after she sank as it were - her entire weight - on my arm - I laid her gently back down on the bed - just then and during this Alice came in room - I said Alice - "Annie is gone" - I knew and feared the end - Jennie the servant called for Dr. M - by phone - we applied or tried to apply stimulants - just then "Mrs. Johnson" - called in Dr. Hugh Nelson - who was passing - all was over - He ( Dr. N) pronounced Annie dead - she passed away about 5:35 PM - Monday Feb 18 - 1901 - at Lyt and Alice Macon's home - Charlottesville Va. - Dr. Macon soon came - Mrs. Wallace - Page and others - came and assisted - The sad end came so sudden - we could not realize "Annie" had passed away - there were no signs of "wasting" - in death she looked as in the bloom of health - and as sweetly at rest - the repose of death - Journey to Wilmington and burial (after services at St John Church - Rev Dr. Jas. Carmichael) in Oakdale Cemetery - Holmes family Lot - friends from a distance - "Sister Eliza" - "Lyt Macon and sister Alice"- and "Minnie Schenck Holmes" - Wilmington kin all there and many family friends - (Burial Ash Wednesday - Feb 20 -1901) - Returned with sister "Alice" to Charlottesville - Feb 27th - 1901 x-

What results may have come - if Annie had heeded the advise of sister Eliza and called in Doctor Nott - in the early part of 1899 - when in Spartanburg - so little apprehension then - of this serious matter!!! Remained in Charlottesville Va. - till April 29th - 1901 - arrived Spartanburg SC - sister Eliza - stayed till May 7th - left for Skyland NC - served with Emilie Vaugh - Forest Hill - Asheville NC til Sept 28th - 1901 - left for Spartanburg (sister Eliza's) - Nov 1st - to Newberry SC at Owens - Jan 7 - 1902 - to Spartanburg SC- went to New York - Jan 20th -(Lawsuit - DJ Schenck vs Oscar Engles - notes etc) - New York - Brooklyn - Jan 21 to Feb 12/1902 - then to sister Alice - Charlottesville Va- Remained in Charlottesville Va - Feb 12 to May 22/1902 - then to Biltmore -(where Ada and Daisy rented house and took boarders) from - May 20/1902 to Oct 9 - 1902 - thence to Hickory (invite Mrs. R?) - Dec 20/1902- Express Co- call and left for Spartanburg SC (WSH And Eliza) - to Newberry SC - Jan 16 to 31st - returned to Eliza's (Spartanburg SC) Feb 20/1903 to Atlanta Ga - to visit Lyda and JJD - remained

Page 64

- June 11 - 1903 (with Lyda and children Margaret and boy Jack) to Pawleys Beach - below Georgetown SC and remained until Aug 7th /1903 - staying with Mrs. St. John Lachicotte - then we me Maud Morris ( a cousin) who married Capt. ( ) and also Lassie Morris (married to Bugg) - good sea bathing and fun times -

Remained in Atlanta till October 3 - 1903 and went to Spartanburg SC - (old ? friends WSW and sister Eliza) and stayed till Oct 20th - (Alice Macon was there part of the time) Left Oct 25 - 1903 for Hickory NC - stopped over at Asheville NC - spent day and night at Emilie Vaugh - called to see Miss Mamie Cameron - (she was not at home) - arrived Hickory NC Oct 27 - 1903 -(Ada ran the house Mr. Royster - I paid all expenses - broke my arm - by a fall - midnight Dec 31 - 1903) Alice and Lyt Macon - sent frequent invitation and so soon as able left Hickory March 10 -1906 - for Charlottesville Va. - Lyt M. - found business opportunity for me - so on June 1 -1904 - I was appointed - "Treasurer of the Virginia Realty and Insurance Co" - Charlottesville Va - (Miss Bibb - also Macon and Heyden and in interest) pay $50.00 for month - lived with Alice and Lyt- besides in house - at table were - Tom Macon and Guy Robinson - In all my stopping with Lyt Macon - I had helped him - in his office work - books- a/c -etc and both with pay and without pay - day to day - a very social - happy and pleasant household - part of the time Mr. and Mrs. Hulfih? - boarded with Alice - while their house - was building - during this time - Tom Macon and I roomed with Dr. W. ? Macon - as his lovely wife (Mary Johnson) had died July 18th - 1903 and we slept in his home - meals at Lyt and Alice-

Alice Macon - died Aug 31 - 1904 - about or near 5 PM- Eliza Haughton and I were there - Alice, Lyt and I had been to Rawley Springs Va for ten days or two weeks - Alice taken sick immediately from our return home to Charlottesville - A - asked - to write to Eliza her sister and little Graham to come as soon as they could - she lived ? ? - we located Lyt - he came in time - I ? The help of nurse (beginner) laid Alice out - she was buried a Sunday ? At Keswah's Macon's plot -AB Schenck-

Page 65

Alice death - broke up Lyt's home - he rented his premises and was soon on the road - as for past 2 years - he has followed -"Drumming" - I went to "? " - Dr. Macon house and boarded - ($20 for mo) - good quarters and happy home - business ruling so dull - with salary deuced to $25 for month - My firm friend WS Haughton - offered me a home with him and Express Co of - needing "Christmas time help" - sent fee for transportation - I left Charlottesville - Dec 21 -1904 - and at midnight - WSH - met me at train - sweet welcome from Eliza - and there I remained - for a season - enjoying their hospitality and invited kindness in many ways-

Eliza - W.G. H. - Willie and self came over to Newberry SC - Saturday Dec 24 - 1904 - by invitation - for Christmas dinner - with Owen - Minnie and family - remained one week - all returned to Spartanburg - There I (NWS) remained till June 5 - 1905 - came over to Newberry SC - stayed with Owen MRH and Minnie till July 6 - 1905 -Daisy was also here - and she left for Atlanta - in June - As Josephine and Ned Baker from Waxahachie - Texas - en route for Norfolk Va. - had arrived at Lydas - at Atlanta Ga- This hastened my leaving - arrived at Atlanta about 4:30 PM - Ada came from Hickory NC - later and stayed 2 weeks - Josephine and Ned left - later in July - Josie going to Richmond to visit Hattie Taylor Borden - then later to Baker at - Norfolk - I remained in Atlanta - with Jack Lyon - till 16 Dec - 1905 -(came along with Jack Lyon - May and Jack J - they en route to New York for holidays) - stayed at Eliza and Willie - spent Christmas - left Spartanburg - Dec 26 - 1905 arrived Newberry SC -same day - 4:30 PM and stayed with Owen and Minnie- (Owen McRae Holmes - died Jan 19 -1910 - Newberry SC)

Daisy accepted service ( ) - TWC House - 33 Cone St - Atlanta - Sept 1 - 1905 - and there now remains -The record is to - Jan 1- 1906 - May add later dates and visits - of personal things - to page (75)

Page 66

Charcoal - antidote for all kinds of internal poisons-xxx-

A Japan MD - says it is impossible for internal poisoning to result in death- if charcoal - (vegetable or animal) is given so soon as gastrointestinal troubles are felt - must be taken on first symptom - large doses - take in suspension in water - Dose - tea spoon of charcoal - put in glass of water and stirred while it taken so that it shall not settle in the bottom of the vessels and sides- Use a large spoon - and give at interval of 10 minutes - The power of this remedy and its results - consist in the absorbing power of charcoal said to have special action - upon "Nox Vomica" - (Canthourdes) - strychnine and also poison - of "Verdig?) - "mushroom" -"arsenic" -"laudanum" - also poisoning by "Ice cream" -

Charcoal takes up alkaloid toxins and mineral poisons - it is the most intense of all known antidotes - great ( ) for all gases and all salts - it immediately determines the formulation of air innocuous combination - It envelops the poison - deporting the poison from the stomach - there is no danger even in large doses of charcoal - This remedy is so simple and so easily procured - it should be made known - far and wide - particularly among families of children and careless parents - Personally - I recommend a dose now and then - for persons - who have pain in the stomach or bowels - as result of gas - or indigestion food or drink - as charcoal is hard to mix with water - it should be stirred until well mixed and taken rapidly - to prevent settling ( ) - NWS

Page 67

Always give others - the credit of being - as honest as you are - before making accusations! -

Have faith in the general Honesty of Man Kind.

Alcohol - or any spirits - can be used with success - in the sick room - as a refrigerant - cooling off the skin in fever - (may be used warm or cold with flannel applications) - It is better than ice - in rapidly of action - and also it certainty - gives much relief to fever patients.

Is coffee as a drink injurious?- Yes and no - properly made and taken in moderation it is a valuable drink - it may be abused - what are the records of some heavy drinkers -

A French Woman - Eliza Daneaux - at the French Court 1827 - then 114 yrs old - her principal nourishment - had been 40 cups (small) per day -

Another - named "Font? " - drank incessantly - and was over 100 yrs old -

Voltaire - drank it to an excess - Napoleon - drank over 20 cups per day - this is the record - its advocates - say at proper time for drinking - gives physical energy and mental activity - ( ) Prohibited to children - in any form - wait until full ( ) development- not for those with heart trouble - for old people - for hard smokers and drinkers - it may be used - to counterbalance the excitiblity produced by tobacco and alcohol - coffee - abused - in some people may produce and allow - insomnia and ( ) - it's a stimulant - to be avoided by the confirmed dypolelic - like many other things - moderation is the golden mean - Try moderation always - NWS

Page 68

Cotton sold in 1905- average price 7 cents - in 1906 - 12 - now strong effort to hold - for 15 cents-

Memo- Jan 26 - 1906 - The 2nd Annual Cotton Convention - met at New Orleans and held session - Jane 11- 12- 13 - Hon. Harvey Jordan - presided - Richard Cheatham - Secretary - E.D. Morgan - Finance Agent - Jno. D. Walker - L.S. - many prominent and influential men - present in all branches of industry and many discussion and subjects to communicate on - The main feature and end - was to influence the farmers and others - to hold on - to the balance of the Cotton Crop - 1905 and 1906- until - 15 cents for # - was secured- The cotton crop - for past 10 years - has averaged - close to 10,000,000 bales - save last crop 1904-1905 - when it exceeded - 13,000,000 bales - The consumption of cotton fabrics has increased and mills continues to increase - as knowledge advances - the people of the world - become better acquainted - travel and civilizing methods - of the great factories extended - commerce opened - Rail roads built in foreign lands- demand will come - The United States - "is the largest producing Cotton country in the world" - in record number - 27,000,000 acres in cotton - with a yield per season - 9,500,000 - to 11,000,000 bales - (this data) - with the same acreage and the improved methods that will surely come - cannot the yield be brought to - 1 bale for acre - on average - not now - but when the manufacturing worlds - "calls for more" - Our farmers - must learn the lesson of diversified crops and rotation - the first lesson and thought - is to raise at home - all the supplies need for family support - help and stock - keep the acreage of your money crop - as near the gauge of "supply and demand" - and this regulates the price - and made the cotton crop a "money making crop" - our farmers buy too much - "fertilizers" - with more industry and right methods - large quantities of manure can be collected and made on the farm - this is important - the matter of the farm - should be - "all necessary feed raised at home" - so far as possible -(NWS)

Page 69

When the War - "between the States" - (United and Confederate sides) - closed in 1865 - the prospects of recuperating really seemed impossible - a vast amount of property destroyed - the labor (Negroes) freed - the country swept almost clean of good money - Confederate money and bonds worthless - and the people - poor - added to this - thousands of the young blood - killed in battles - or wounded for life - The situation seemed desperate - with little hope on any side - then the result of the Army's return to "peaceful ways" - re-organization - new conditions - and complex question - gave promise of much trouble - to the South - I thought - if we could recover our former status and wealth in 100 years - we would be doing well - this is now - the year of "Grace" 1905 - scarce 50 years have passed - and see the wonderful changes and situation - as shown forth - today - in the attached memoranda - from the "Manufactural Record" - as described by editor RH Edmunds - extracts from his letter - to the Atlantic Constitution - Nov 9 - 1905 -

(Read and ponder) -

"South Was Unknown"

"(1866) Then the world knew comparatively little about the South, and what it did
know was colored by the wild sensationalism of political enemies and of many un-
friendly newspapers. (1905) Today, not only is this country from the Atlantic to the
Pacific, but throughout Europe, it is recognized that the South is the coming center
of the world's greatest activity.
Here is to be "the coming El Dorado of American adventure". It is entirely within
reason to say that within the next five years and before the Atlanta Exposition shall be
opened (1910) - for it may be accepted that Atlanta, having put its hand to the plow
and projected this exposition, will not now turn back, but that, as in the past, it will
carry forward to preeminent success an undertaking worthy of the country, worthy of
the South, and around which the business interests of the entire country can justly rally-
the advancement of the South will be far greater than all that has been accomplished
in the last 15 years. What we have done in 15 years in material up building, in the
accumulation of wealth, in the development of coal and iron properties, in the utili-
zation of our unlimited water powers, will now be duplicated within five years.
From Wheeling, W. Va, to El Paso, Texas, from the high mountains of Western
Carolina to the Gulf, there is a wide sweep of business activity, of increasing pros-
perity of life and enthusiasm. In all that broad section is heard what has been "the
aptly termed music of progress, the whirr of the spindle, the buzz of the saw, the
throb of the locomotive and the roar of the furnace." The possibilities of the future
are practically without limit. It is true that we are making nearly as much iron and
mining more coal that the United States made of the one and mined of the other
25 years ago, but so vast are the resources of the South in coal and iron that this section
can continue the profitable development of mining of iron and steel making to the
point where we shall produce far more than the entire country now produces."

"Mill Capital Increased"

"It is true we have increased the capital invested in cotton mills from $21,000,000
to $225,000,000, and that we have now 9,000,000 spindles, against 600,000 spindles
25 years ago, but we are still furnishing three-fourths of the raw material for the
110,000,000 spindles which are operating in the world. Our cotton crop, averaging
$6000,000,000 in value when sold by the Southern farmers, is worthy largely over
$2,000,000,000 in the finished product before it reaches the consumer. If we would
measure something of the limitless possibilities of the future, it should be remember-
ed that in the great territory which stretches from the Potomac to the Rio Grande,
bordered on one side by a mountain range bursting with mineral wealth and on the
other side by the Atlantic and the Gulf, there are many times as much coal and as
much iron as all Europe possesses; that in this same region stands on half of the timber
of the United States; that here is found the richest oil territory known in America;
that here centers a monopoly of the world's cotton production and the predestined
center of cotton manufacturing as well; here are found wheat and corn and rice and
sugar; here fruits of all varieties find their most perfect development; here is found
a uniform rainfall, with a climate ranging from the cold of the high mountains of
Virginian and Carolina to the warmth of the far South. It is in this favored region
that the highest activities known to the human race are to find their greatest opportunity
and reap their most abundant financial rewards."

Cotton bales used in manufacturing - in 1880 - 225,000 - in 1905 - 2,163,000 bales - value cotton crop 1905 - 680,000,000 - Pig iron - in tons - 3,300,000 and coal mined in 1880 - 6 million tons - in 1905 - 67 million tons - railroad mileage 1880 - 20,000 and 1895 - 60,000 -

Farm products 1880 - 660 million - 1905 - 1,750,000 dollars. Lumber products - 1880 - 39,000,000 - 19905 is 250,000,000- valued manufactured products - 1880 - 4457 millions - 1905 - 1,750,000,000 - assessed property in 1905 - 6,000,000,000- NWS

Page 70

(1905) At one period - in my younger days - 1840-1846 - my beloved Mother - had the purpose in her mind - to have me take the Profession of Medicine - the plan was that at the proper time - I was to go to Brooklyn - New York and study - and be under the instruction and care of my Mother's oldest brother - Uncle John Coffin Fanning, MD - He died 9th March 1846 - which event put a complete and final end - to my Mother's purpose - after that is was a "drift" - for me - for some time - though finally I dropped into the work of an Accountant - commencing with - "posting" my Uncle Phineas Fanning's books - In those days of the 40's or 50's - in event of sickness in families - should it become lengthy and the members of the family - worn and fatigued with care and from broken rest - then it was customary to go out and call on friends -"to come and nurse the sick" - the day of the "Trained Nurse" as we have it now had not dawned and little was known of them - in the small towns of our Southland - hence "friends" - were called to the rescue - and always willing hearts and hands always responded - I had gained some good will in this line - and for many years - I was requested to come and help - so far as I could by "reading" - was prepared to give assistance - in our day and time - we had - a serious fever - called "Bilious Fever" - the practice of medicine gave - "Calomel" - it followed the patient - was denied "water" - you must know - there was no "Ice" - to be had - in summer or in fact hardly at any time in those days - the method of "Manufactured Ice" - was unknown - and what came in later years to our town - was from the North - New York and Maine - and sold generally at first - from 4 to 6 cents per pound - by retail - think of the child - with burning fever - the summer heat 85 to 98 degrees - and no drink allowed. But so the wise MD's - of my younger days - practiced and prescribed and ---- killed. x-

Page 71

A Bilious fever tale - about 1840 -

My Cousin Phin Wood - a boy of 10 - sick for many days at Uncle PWF's - with that same "old bilious fever" - burning fever - hot days and nights - in August - dosed with Calomel -

Oh! my son (say Mother Mary F.) -"cannot allow any water" - Dr H. says - no - no - no - no-!!!!

Here follows the story he told me - "sick and suffering and famished - one Saturday night - my Father John - after certain washings - forgot to remove all water from the room - as had been done faithfully - every day and night - heretofore - and my parents retired - I could not sleep - and so lay awake - sick and feverish - the night advanced - thirst was intense - Oh! Could I only have just one swallow of water - there I lay and suffered - finally I resolved to get up - weak and sick as I was and search for some "forbidden water" - softly and silently and carefully - out of bed - moving with care - to my great delight - I found a basin - in it was water - I drank my fill and to this day - remember the taste of the soap and the sand and dirt in my mouth - But Oh! It was so delightful and so sweet - crawled back to bed - soon sleep came and next day - Dr. said I was much better - I improved at once and now living 50 years after this "surly stolen water are secret" - The water in that basin - which I drank - was the same - my father had washed his feet in -!" x WS

Page 72

(1263 AD to 1800 AD)- Yonge - Elizabeth and Johanna Yonge Line -Mr. Richard Morris

The William McKenzie - who came to America - about 1746 - was the Original Ancestor - so far as American Kinsfolk pertain - His ancestors - were Scotch - the family seats - being Loed Castle - New Torbel - Castleron - all in Cromerty County - 100 miles from Edinburgh - McKenzies first family - of the Fitz Gerald of Kildare - distinguished soldier was Collin Fitz Gerald - King (Alexander 3rd) gave him favor and title and the Barony of Kintail - Kennison succeeded and took the name of McKennis - after the highland manner and MacKensies by the English - son seceded - ( ) - Alexander - Roderick - Kenneth - Colin - down to 1726 - 1732 - 1746 by Generations -

Arms of the MacKensies of Cromerty - (are quarterly) viz: -

1st on a mountain inflamed proper for the name of McLeod

2nd Blue - a stags head - for the name of McKenzie

3rd - Gules - 3 legs - armed and spurred - belonging to McLeod - as old possessions of the

"Isle of Man"

4th - Argent - on a pole sable - an impressed crown within treasure gules for the name of Erskine of Innondale-

Crest - sun in splendor - motto - "Iucro non uro" -----

William McKenzie -(original) - reached America soon after Battle of Culloden - in which William kin participate and some had joined the Rebellion - such acts possibly hurried William - to leave the Country of Scotland- we find William McKenzie in the colony and later married to Catherine Campbell - daughter of William Campbell - member of Kings Counsel- Colony of Virginia - this union produced - sons George and John - daughter Christian* - who became Mrs Phillip Yonge - and Anna Jean who married Simpson

Christian McKenzie married Phillip Yonge - sons - William and Henry

Betsey - who married Robert Gibbs

Eliza C. - who married Richard Bradley Senior

*Christian McKenzie Yonge - becoming a widow - married for her 2nd husband - Jas. Fleming- children Mary - 2nd wife of Robert Gibbs and sister to his first wife - Betsy

Anna Bella - married William Giles

Susan - never married and was known as Aunt Susan

Daniel Fleming -

Note - Mrs. Christian (Campbell) - widow Phillip Yonge and wife of Jas. Fleming in April 1791 - was living at Brown Marsh - Bladen Co. - NC- when he ( ) James Fleming had a plantation - here sister Anna Jean (Campbell) Simpson - lived in Wilmington NC-

Page 73

William - son Phillip Yonge and Christian McKenzie - married Leila Leithiher - of French descent - and had one daughter (only child) - John-Anna Yonge of Savannah Georgia who married Richard Morris - of Wilmington NC

Children - Charles - Born 14 Jan 1835 -

Mary Elizabeth - July 28/1887 - married NW Schenck - Nov 3 -1858 -

Issue- Mary C. - Eliza F. - Richard ( no issue - died Oct 12 - 1862 - yellow fever

epidemic) - Ada B. -Josie E. - Margaret S. - William C. and James S.

Jonathan Pope Calder - born 17 -1840 - married Addie Polly - 2 sons and 1

Daughter - married 2nd wife _______

Elizabeth Ann - born 14 July 1844 - married M. Iver - Annie R - married Nila -

Herbert D. Leila and Betty (Betty died June 9 1879)

Susan F - born July 14 - 1846 - married T. Whitaker - Hattie M. - Josie Y - Mary S.

Betsy Yonge - married Robert Gibbs - children Phillip and Robert - who never married - issue

3 sons - Rev. George M - who married "Asenath Morgan" - issue - Sarah(1)-

John (4) -Sophia (3) - Anna (5) - Willie (2) - George (6)

Margaret Lila - born 14 Oct 1848 - married Corbie - ( ) ( ) -

Lula L - Married McIver

Richard -Phillip Y. - Richard ( ) - Nick Nixon - Jas Dickson these 5 boys - all died

no more - Richard died - Feb 22 - Nick N. ( ) 2x rest ( )

Eliza Claudia Yonge - married Richard Bradley 1769- his 2nd wife - children-

Richard - who married 1825 Jane Williams of Ohio - issue - Amoset G. -

Eliza - Richard and John

Henry W. - married Cutler (California)

Alfred O. Frances Lippert - issue - Jaines (a daughter)

James A Phillip (Charles - never married - died in Raleigh) ( ) in California

Christian - married Rev. WW Ecles - no issue - lived in Philadelphia (adopted

a daughter) - (Rev WWE Presbyterian Divinity)

Mary - married Wingate - 12 children South - NO

Lucy - married - Stephen Jewett - (2nd wife) - children - 5 sons and 2 daughters

"Yonge" - "Bradley" -"Willie" - " ? " - "Henry" - "Lockett O" and "Robt. D"

Page 74

Mary - daughter - Jas. Fleming and Christian (Campbell McKenzie) Yonge (widow Phillip Yonge) - married Robert Gibbs - his 2nd wife - Mary was sister of Robert Gibbs 1st wife - Betsey Yonge - (one mother)

Children - 4 daughters and 1 son

Christian - who married Campbell - daughter "Sophia"

Anna Bella - married Peter Mallett - issue - Susan G. - Charles - Robert G - Jas J. - Pierre -

George H - Murray (Rena ? )

Jimonsime - married Jno. M. Walker - issue - John - Lucian - Fleming - Margaret

Emma - married Jus. Munsey - died NC (issue)

Adam Empie - married Josephine A Church - issue - Jas. - Bertie - Flossie - Arthur (Irving first child - died and buried -Clinton NC)

Anna Bella - daughter Jas. Fleming and Christian McKenzie Yonge - married William Giles

Issue - issue 3 daughters and 2 sons

Anna Bella - married Doct Norwood - Hillsboro NC (issue)

Margaret - married Yonge - (issue) Phillip Yonge of Savannah

Christias - never married (James Giles - no record)

William Burke Giles - married Almenia Reston - issue - Jonathan Reston - Norwood -

Clayton - James

The Family Tree of the Jno. Shapless and Jane Moore (his wife) - 1662 - They came to Penn.

14 - 6 mo 1682 - his generation decedents - till we come to Elizabeth 1734 Shapless -

(dau. John) - married Richard Bradley 15 may 1755 - (4th son John Bradley) - he had a son Richard born 1769 - married Rebecca Green - ( 3 dau. - Dr. Sam Green ) - children - 1st wife - Richard* who married Mary Fisher - issue Chas. F. - Mary Constance and Eliza G - This Eliza G - became Mrs (Dr.) John Hill - 10 children - this Richard * must have been the one who married E. Claudia Yonge - as Richard Bradley (Amoret father ) was sister to Mrs. Dr Jno. Hill and not the Richard Bradley - born 1759 or 1769 - as the Family Tree indicates - This is the connections - as shown by marriage - descendants of "Shapless" " Lords" - "Bradley's" - "Wright's" - Wooten - Empie - Hills - Jewetts - Meares - Wingate - Yancey - Yonge - Gibbs - Fleming _Giles - Hatteridge - Dudley - Crook - Morris - Bernanrd - Lloyd- Owens - ? - Swann - London, etc - NWS

Page 75

From page 65 - (NWS - travels and sojourns and visits)

At New berry - by invited from Owen MR - Dec 25 - 1905 -to April 1 -1906-

Spartanburg SC with WG and Eliza - April 1- 1906 - June 1 -1 1906 -

With Daisy - went to Hickory NC - June 1 -1906- to September 7 -1906-

Norfolk Virginia with Josephine and EN Baker - Sept 7 - 1906 -to March 2 -1907

Spartanburg SC - with WG and Eliza - March 13 -1907 to March 30 -1907

To New berry - March 31 - 1907 - Willy GH -Senior - died April 30 -1907 and by letter from Capt - THH - Eliza and Owen advice - I went to Spartanburg SC - to help EHH - in her Insurance Agency - arrived May 7 - next day came Eliza - Graham and Miss Maggie H - on May 10 - came Mrs. St. Clair - John and Miss - CC ( ) - arranged for business - telegraphs - renew ( ) - set to work - and conducted office and remained - instructing EHH and doing the work - examining books - etc - till July 26 - 1907 - J. Mann James came June 10 - and relieved me and assisted and I took vacation - July 26 - going to THH - was home - at Charlotte NC by invites - spent a lovely 10 days and left Aug 5 and reached Wil. NC same day - and stopped with my sister in law - (Mrs. Sue Whitaker) - Aunt Kate - Julia - Col Taylor - James - ( ) - Cummings - John Wright - Lord - Arthur and then called to see me - a fine visit- Sept 30 - 1907 - took car for Columbia - reached Newberry - Oct 2 and proceed to Spartanburg SC - Oct 12 to relieve J. Mann James - as he goes home on Oct - 15 - 1907 - conducted office affairs from Oct 12 - to Dec 22 - Eliz. ( ) and G. to Newberry - Dec 22 to Jan 2- 1908 - Christmas and New Year - Spartanburg SC - Jan 2 - 1908 - to June 25 - 1908 - as E - could conduct affairs without help - Made out administrators report Estate- WJH - deceased and left all matters in order and complete in every way - visited Josephine ENB - Spartanburg - June 26 - 1908 - to Aug 30 - Aug 30 - to Sept 13 - 1908 - with Ada - at Hickory NC - Left Hickory - Sept 13/1908-

Page 76

Arrived Black Mountain NC and with Lyda - Sept 13 to 18th - Hickory NC - Sept 19/29 - 1908 left and arrive at New Bern - NC -Sept 29/1908 and this is home by invite Neb B and Josephine - 124 Craven St (now located) - to Beaufort NC -Aug 22 -1909 - to Aug 30 - At Miss Emma D Manson - New Bern NC - Aug 31 to July J- 1910 -Left New Bern - Dec 21 - 1908 to attend wedding WCS and Caroline Jones Newberry - Dec 29, 1908 - remained Dec 22-28, 24-25-28/29 ( ) r/11 then to New Bern via Wilmington both ways -

Left - July 6 for Black Mountain - remained at Emma's - till Aug 27 - 1910

At Hickory with Ada - Aug 27-1910 to Oct 1- 1910

New Bern NC - Oct -1910 - to March 18- 1911

Elizabeth City - NC - March 19 - 20 - 1911 at Pools

Richmond Va - March 21 - April 6 - 1911 - at Borden

Norfolk Va - April 7 - 8 - 9 - 10th - at Borden

New Bern NC - April 10 - 6PM at home and all OK - 1911 and remained since - moved (1911)

May 29/30/31 - June 1 - to 89 Broad Street - and fixed and better secure - etc

Page 78

History of American Schenk's-

"In tracing the history of the Captain John Schenck homestead the author goes back to the fifteenth century. Hendrick Schenck Van Nydock, night, Lord of Afferden and Walbeck and Feoffer of Wachtendonck, a man of importance in the low countries, was the ancestor of the Schenck who founded the family in America. This old dwelling, a fine photograph picture of which appears in Mr. Ditmas book stands on Mill Island, and is more than two hundred and fifty years old and is probably, the oldest habitable house in Kings County, if not in New York State"

My ancestor was Jan or John - NW Schenck

"Martense Schenck" - had a son John - who came to America - about 1650 - from the Netherlands - (Holland -Europe) - settling what is now known - as Flatlands - Long Island - New York - and he had a brother - "Roeloff" - and both lived in (Amersfoot) - now Flatlands - near Brooklyn NY-

"John" married "Jannetjie Van Voorhees" - he bought the island and from Elbert E. Stoothoff - about Dec 29, 1657 - Known as "Crooks Mill" near Berjan Island - bought about 20 acres land (Flatland) - Aug 20 -1660 - and took oath of allegiance - in 1687 - on Jan 26 - 1688 or 9 - made a will and devised to his son Martin - the mill and Island and to his son Stephen - the "Canarsie Lands and Meadows" at "Hodge Neck" - see Conveyance Book - page 140 - ( ) 1 - Brooklyn - New York Records -

Roeloff and Jan Schenck Van Nydeck - came to New Netherlands -(NY) - 1650 sister Johanna came 1683 - Original emigrants and ancestors - ( ) and ( ) - AD Schenck - Lieut - 2 US Ant - Rev Garrett Schenck - says - original name was Schenck Van Nydeck- in Holland-

John Schenck and wife Jane had following issue-

(1) Jane - born about 1673 - married John Dorlant - May 20 -1692

back to main page/prev/next