Nicholas W. Schenck Diary 
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Nicholas W. Schenck
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anyone - kindly return it
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"The American - Fanning Line"

The first Fanning who came to this country was Edmund Fanning - born in Ireland in (about)

1620 - of the Fannings in Ireland - Limerick, Tipperary, Kilkinny, Clare - the name is on record from 13th Century to confutation under Cromwell in 1652. Vast estates were established to the Fannings.

Edmund - the emigrant American ancestor - who settled in Connecticut about 1653 was the son of Francis Fanning, 1841 Mayor of Limerick, Ireland - Connaught Certification Office of Exchequer, Dublin. His name is given as Fitz - Francis Fanning. Fit-Francis means son of Francis - Fitz is French or Norman meaning "son of ____".

This Edmund or Edmond - emigrated to America in 1653 (authority) of John O'Hart, Edmund Irish antiquity and author of Irish Peogries - Clentus of Ireland and is found at Fisher Island in 1655 and 1657, later at Groton - Connecticut (near New London) 1664 - now called Ledyard - where he had a farm called Groton Farm - which remained in possession of family for 150 years - where he lived until his death in 1683. It is recorded - Edmund was the friend of Gov. Winthrop and came to what was called the Pequot Country - possibly by invite of Winthrop.

The oldest court record in the New London Court Book (Comm and Earn) Dec 29, 1664 affirms Edmund Fannings name. Edmund Fanning was on of the original proprietors of Stonington - Conn. He received in grants 542 acres of land - in addition to his "New London" - "Groton" and Volunteer grants - certain grant - 2 miles N of Old Mystic - Eastward of River was merged into "Hempstead Farm"

Stonington Town Records record his name Feb 9 -1669, 1676, 1674, 1677, 1673 and 1680 Elected Surveyor of Highway. (Made a freeman 17 May 1673) took Freeman Oath 27 April 1674.

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Edmund Fanning served in the "King Phillip War" - 1675-76 - as also his sons (3) Edmund, Thomas and John (see Old Proprietors Record Book - Volunteer Com.) Edmund served in Narragansett Was as evident by lots of land - granted to him for service. Thomas Minor (Diary 1663-1667) makes frequent notice of Edmund and his wife (Ellen) calling her "good wife Fanning" and "sister Fanning"

Edmund was a man of influence and usefulness holding various offices of trust - receiving large grants of land from New London and Stonington - active service in the Indian Wars with his 3 sons.

Died December 1683 - Stonington - Conn. (About 64 yrs of age)

The records of New London - Conn were burned by Arnold (the traitor) Sept 6 - 1781 - hence many dates lost.

At "cemetery" Riverhead - Long Island is a gravestone erected 1849 and removed 1861 - the inscription set forth - "Capt. James Fanning - age and great-grandson of Dominick - mayor (under Charles I) city in Ireland - (prisoner captured) Battle of Drogheda - beheaded and his son Edmund married Catherine - daughter Hugh Hays - Earl of Connaught. Edmund emigrated to America with his wife Catherine and 2 sons - Thomas and William and 2 servants - Lahorne and Oma and settled in Stonington - Conn. And more".

The above information cannot be proven by historical record - it has many errors and therefore should be discarded.

Edmund the first settler in America - father was named Francis - Edmund married in Ireland and his wife's name was Ellen - beyond that no record - as to Irish Family - it is a certainty -

It is correct Dominick Fanning was mayor of Limerick - 3 times - 1641 - 1645 - 1646- member of Parliament 1644 at the siege of Limerick 1651 - surrendered 29 Oct 1651 - Dominick with 20 others were excluded from the terms of surrender because Gen. Ludlow said "they had prevailed on the people to foolishly protest the siege."

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Of those 21 - Maj Gen Hugh O'Neal was spared by efforts of General Ludlow. Bishop Ed O'Dugan escaped through the connivance of the same the others were executed - Dominick Fanning endeavoring to escape from a church was caught - hanged - body quartered and decapitated - his head on a pole - placed at St. John's Gate.

This record as (factum) is correct -

So far as research and record can prove - the Genealogy of the American Fannings is as follows - First emigrant ancestor - record says he came to America about 1653

Edmund Fanning - (son of Francis) - born 1620 -

married Ellen about -- 1649 from Ireland

Issue - 5 sons and - 2 daughters -

Edmund born in Ireland about 1651 - died about 1715 - married Margaret Billings

Margaret born in New London about 1652 - deceased April 1664

*Thomas born in Fisher Island about 1655 - married Frances Ellis

John born in Fisher Island about 1657

William born in Fisher Island about 1659 - killed by Indians at Poquchannach - no record more

James born in New London about 1663

Mary born in New London - April 28 1665 - married Ben ( ) -5 sons and 5 daughters

Notes - in this list above marked * refers to my mother's line - Eliza Ann Fanning - who married William Schenck 1823 or 1824 (NWSchenck)

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*Thomas Fanning - 3rd child and 2nd son of Edmund (Senior ) and Ellen -

Thomas died 27 April 1704

Born Fisher Island - 1655 - married Frances Ellis - Oct 19 1684-

Issue -Thomas born Stonington Conn - 27 April 1685

Frances born Stonington Conn - 19 Aug 1689 - married Timothy Van Pelt - Feb 1726

Catherine born Stonington Conn - 1692 - married Ranger - 2nd husband ( ) Page

*James born Stonington Conn - April 30 1695 - church records say 12 Aug 1694 - no doubt correct

Richard born Stonington Conn - June 9 1698

Thomas Senior served in the Narragansett War - received land for service

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*James Fanning - 2nd son and 4th child of Thomas Fanning and Frances Ellis - grandson of Edmund Senior - born Stonington Conn - he moved to Smithtown LI - in early life and became the sole progenitor of all the Long Island Fannings - who are many - died June 1779 age 84-

married in 1718 - Hannah Tooker Smith - born 1703 - died 10 Sept 1750 - 48th year. James born (not known) baptized 12 Aug 1694 at Stonington Conn-

Issue - 8 sons and 3 daughters -

James born Smithtown LI - 22 March 1719 - married Deborah Warner - 3 sons & 3 daughters

Thomas born Smithtown LI - 10 Nov 1722 - married Lydia Horton - 2 sons & 2 daughters

*Phineas born Smithtown LI - Aug 2 1724 - see his record - married M. Wells -

2nd marriage Mary Hubbard

William - twin - born Smithtown LI - Oct 26 1728 - married Mary Tazwell - s & d

An Episcopal Clergyman - ordained 10 March 1754 - London - England

Katharine - twin - born Smithtown LI - Oct 26 1728 (died in infancy - 11th Mar ?)

Bertha born Smithtown LI - died about 1775 - married Terry

Richard born Smithtown LI - 173 - died in 3rd year

Gilbert born Smithtown LI - 1733 - married Hildah Palmer - 10 sons and 2 daughters

Very distinguished family

Richard Born Smithtown LI - 1737 - moved to North Carolina - died 1773 - children died young-

little is known

Edmund - twin - born Southold - 24 April 1739 - later General Edmund - distinguished -

married Phoebe Maria Burns

Hannah - twin - born Southold - 24 April 1739 - married Jonathan Mc? - 31 Aug 1762 -

Distinguished.

James Fanning Senior married Feb 25 1752 - Thankful Hinckley Cheseborough - a widow for 2nd wife - daughter of Samuel and Martha ( ) Hinckley - born 22 March 1712 and died

Thankful had six children by Cheseborough marriage.

Capt. James Fanning took an active part in the French and Indian War -1746.

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*Phineas Fanning - 3rd son and 3rd child of Capt James Fanning and Mdse. Hannah Smith

Born Smithtown LI - 2 Aug 1724 - died 2 June 1796 - 71st year-

Married Mehitobel Wells - 12 January 1748 - daughter Solomon and Esther Wells -

born at Northville LI - Oct 7 1729 - died in her 49th year-

Issue -

*Phineas - born Franklinville LI - Laurel 6 Aug 1750

Esther - born Franklinville LI - 1752 - married Dec 1775 - William Brown - Shelter Island

Nathaniel - born Franklinville LI - 22 March 1755 - married Anna Wells - 6 sons & 4 daughters

Captain in Col. Fannings Kings American Regiment - also in NC - died in London - 1808

Barclay - born Franklinville LI -1757 - married Caroline Harrison Orne -4 sons and 2 daughters

William - born Franklinville LI -1764 - no record

Mehitobel - born Franklinville LI - 1770 - married Enoch Jagger - 2 sons and 1 daughter -

she died in her 29th year

Mehitobel Wells - father was a Judge at Northville LI - a man of piety and wealth and Grandson

of Rev. William Wells, Norwich - Eng.

The above Phineas is known as "Col. Phineas" - in early life he settled in Southold - now Laurel - built his homestead in 1762 - served in the French and Indian War 1746-47 - named a Lieut. In Capt. James Fanning's Company - 1st Battalion Foot - Justice of Peace 1763 -

At the time of was 1775 - between colonies and England - he held command as Col. Of Militia from King George III - was chosen Deputy to represent Suffolk Co. in the Provincial Convention called to elect members to the First Continental Congress in Philadelphia (meeting New York Convention).

These were troublesome times - the colonies now in rebellion - it seemed Col. Phineas

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wavered as to just which way to go - holding commission for the King - two of his brothers - Edmund and ( ) one son and many family kin on the Royal side - The Battle of Long Island came August 1776 and this event appears as the turning point for on July 8 1776 - he was appointed Muster Master to raise company for Suffolk Co - then on Aug 7 Congress ordered Gen. Wooster to send four companies to each end of LI - to guard stock and to be under command of Col. Fanning - again 29 August 1776 - Col. Smith dispatched Col. Fanning to be bearer of orders to them - relative to evacuation of Brooklyn. Record show Col. Fanning later remained at home - until peace came. In his younger days - was Captain of a ship and brought home many handsome things - kept open house and entertained a good style - greatly respected in his community and exerted a wide influence - member of Presbyterian church - Southold established Oct 1640.

For his 2nd wife married Mrs. Mary Hubbard with 3 children - married - 14 Feb 1779 - no issue - died 1806.

Col. Phineas died West Hampton LI - 2 June 1796 - buried at Jamesport. By his will 30 May 1796 - made provision to free his Negro slave "Cosmus" - Cosmus added to his name and became Cosmus Fanning. Lived on Shelter Island LI - where he died in 1831 - leaving a will in which he mentions wife Dido and daughter Julia.

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*Phineas - 1st son and 1st child of Col. Phineas and Mehitobel Wells -

Born Aquebogue LI - now Laurel - Aug 6 1750 - graduated at Yale College as AM in 1769 - studied law - moved to Nantucket Island - beginning Revolutionary War and lived all his days there and practiced ( )

Married 5 April 1777 - Keziah Coffin - born Nantucket - 5 Jan 1759 - daughter and only child of John and wife Keziah (Folger) Coffin. Keziah was 1st cousin to Benjamin Franklin, who (father of his mother), was a son - Jebbidiah Folger and grandson Peter Folger were colonist.

Issue-

John Coffin - born Nantucket 28 May 1778 - married Nancy Coffin - daughter of Capt Thaddeus

and Nancy Coffin

*William - born Nantucket - 25 April 1780 - see later account - Grandfather (by NW Schenck)

Hetty Wells - born Nantucket - 12 July 1782 - Daniel Wood

Caroline Matilda - born Nantucket - 9 June 1784 - (Ja? ) BrownWood

Thomas - born Nantucket - 12 Aug 1786 - known as Capt - never married - buried Charleston SC

Edmund - born Nantucket - 5 Dec 1790 - married Hester Lewis - 3 daughters - never married

Robert Barclay - born Nantucket - 10 Feb 1793 - married Phoebe Coleman Swain ( )

Phineas Wines - born Nantucket - 10 May 1799 - married Mrs. Emily (Janey May) Moore

Phineas died 21 Dec 1798 - 49 years - Keziah Coffin his wife - died 20 Nov 1820 - 62 yrs - buried Nantucket.

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John Coffin Fanning - 1st son and 1st child of Phineas Fanning and Keziah (Folger) Coffin

Born Nantucket 28 May 1778 - married Nancy Coffin - sept 22 1802

Followed the sea

Issue - Adaline - born 11 June 1805 - never married

He died at Grand Father's (his brother William's) home in New York - Brooklyn - 9 Sept 1819

Note by N.W.S. - Adaline Fanning - only child of John and Nancy - came to Wilmington NC in the '50's to visit her Uncle Phineas Wines - she stayed around among the relatives families - who were her 1st cousins - John C and Robert B. Wood - her Aunt Hetty and daughters Charlotte and Harriet and also her cousins Eliza Bunker Haines - Louisa Augusta Ferguson and others. Again while I was living on Court Street - Brooklyn LI - cousin Addie visited us in 1868 - 1872 as she was a frequent visitor to Brooklyn - having friends.

A maiden lady that was over 60 - a contemporary with my mother - spending many of her maiden days - 1820 and later with Mother and Aunt Ann at Grand Pa Fanning's in Brooklyn - 1811 and so on - said to have been handsome in her youth - she died Nantucket- 16 Oct 1877-72 yrs.

In remembrance to my wife - Mary Eliza - she willed her a handsome Amethyst breast pin - lozenge shaped - surrounded by brilliants - to my Mother and Aunt Ann - she left some property.

My elder sister - Adaline Fanning Bromley - was named for her - Great Uncle John C. Fanning (above) line - thus comes to and end - extinct- x

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*William Fanning (Nicholas W. Schenck's Grand Father)

Born Nantucket - Mass 25 April 1780

Married Nancy Rogers Simmons - New London Conn - (daughter Chapman and Elizabeth

Forsyth) - New York City - March 1803.

Issue - John Coffin - born New York City - 12 January 1804 - graduated Princeton - 1820-

Studied medicine - practiced - never married - died 9 March 1846 - Head of Profession- Monument in Greenwood

*Eliza Ann - born Brooklyn - NY ( ) Oct 1805

Ann Eliza - born Brooklyn NY - 25 January 1808 - married Charles Cable - Pokeepsie NY

He died in Brooklyn

Issue - Fanning - married Mary - d Melton River - died leaving one son and one daughter

William ( NY ) Mary lived with her father's cousin - Mrs. Johnson for years - never married -

Died - Adaline and Caroline Cable living in Brooklyn in 1904

Aunt Ann died 13 Aug 1898- 90 years - buried Greenwood Cemetery

William Augustus - born Brooklyn - 21 March 1810 - lived many years in Pokeepsie and died there.

Kezia Coffin - born Brooklyn - 9 April 1813 - died in infancy

Caroline Orne - born Brooklyn - 9 Feb 1816 - when a little girl - her right hand was so badly Bitten by a neighbor's dog - that amputation followed - this dreadful thing happened at her Grandfather Simmons house in New York City - she was educated for a teacher - followed it until her marriage - she resided one year or more with Uncle Phineas and taught school for young ladies in Wilmington NC - married Anton Metz (German) - 18 May 1856 and (Mary & I) were entertained for a day by them at Hoboken NJ on wedding trip - Nov 4/Dec 15 1858 - in her younger days she was handsome - died Brooklyn or New York City - July 1888 - no issue

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Thomas Chapman - born Brooklyn NY - Dec 19 1818 - married Elizabeth Lee - New Paltz NJ 10 Oct 1839

Issue- Thomas Augustus - born - Newburg NY - 1841 - died in infancy

Josephine -born- Newburg NY- 23 Sept 1842- married Rev. Joseph E. Denholm-Episcopal

Issue - Carrie Louise - born 5 July 1869 - married Fitzgerald - NJ lawyer

Anna Chandler - born - 19 Nov 1870 - married Wrightman

Hubert Alfred - born 9 Nov 1874

Mary Fay - born 12 April 1883

Note by N.W.S. - Uncle Tom - followed same business as his father and brother (? )(rope making). After he kept hotel at New burg NY - later in the 50's came to Wilmington NC - with wife Aunt Lib and cousin Josie - made first home with Uncle Phineas - later opened and operated the "Carolina Hotel" in partnership with his cousin Robert B. Wood - for some years and returned North and then took up dancing. Visited me - spending the winter of 1881 - dancing school I visited him where he lived in Newburg in 1849 and in 1866/71 and 1885/1896 - when living in Brooklyn - was a frequent visitor - often spending several days. Uncle Tom was very kind to "Mary" - in attention and gifts - as also to all my children - having instructed them in dancing and graceful deportment.

In his later years and during my last stay in Brooklyn - up to 1896 - I helped him in many ways - chiefly by securing him a (?hall room) - so that he could continue his now reduced classes and in this way help him - to help himself - by my paying rent. He had his faults and I do not excuse them - I draw the curtain of silence over them - hoping his soul is at peace - he died hospital NY- 26 June 1897 - buried Pokeepsie NY.

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Edmund - 8th child of William and Nancy Fanning - born 14 Jan 1823 - d - in infancy

Grandfather William Fanning died Sept 29 1861 - buried in cemetery near Harlem NY

Grandmother Nancy Simmons Fanning - died Sept 12 1861 - buried in Pokeepsie NY

Note by N.W.S. - I (NWS) visited Brooklyn 1849 and also at Pokeepsie - to visit my kin folks - Uncle William Augustus and wife Keziah - Aunt Ann Cable and husband Charles - this is my first recollection of seeing my maternal grandparents and aunts and uncles and many cousins - Isabella - Emilie - Robert B. - Schenck - Fanning - Mary - Aunt Ann Cable and also Aunt Phoebe

widow of Robert B. Fanning and her daughter Rebecca - Grandfather Fanning - then about 69 years old - small man in flesh and statue - say 5ft 6 inches - quick and nervous in action - incessant talker - Grandmother looked the old lady - active and always urging one to have something to eat. I stayed at different points and place - May to Nov 1849 - and returned to Wilmington NC - coming home by sea and bringing sister Aletta Jane with me - in one Jonas Smith Packet - Capt. George (Burrlier) - we made the run in 3 days - fair wind and good breeze all down the coast. Visiting Brooklyn and Canarsie at later dates - 1852 - 1854- 1856 - - I also visited and spent many happy days with kin folks in Pokeepsie - part of the time staying with my married sister Aletta and Dr. Jno. R. Cooper - I assisted Uncle William Fanning in posting his books - working bills and etc - also on wedding trip Nov and Dec 1858 visited Pokeepsie and stayed at homes of Uncle W.A. Fanning and Rev. Dr. Jno. Cooper and also entertained by other kin folks.

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William Augustus Fanning - 4th child and 2nd son of William Fanning and Nancy Simmons

Born Brooklyn LI - March 21 1810

Married 1st wife Mary Daniels - Sandy Hill - New York - died 1834 - Pokeepsie

Issue - Isabella - born Dec 8 1832 - unmarried - died 10 April 1876 - 42 yrs- A charming girl - visited Wilmington NC in 1847 - much beloved and honored in Pokeepsie

For 2nd wife William A. married Kezia Coffin - on 23 July 1837 - she was daughter of Robert Barclay Fanning and Phoebe Swain - therefore his cousin - Kezia born Oct 26 1819

Issue - Emilie Wood - born May 14 1838 - married Harry Howard - 1 son - Frank B.

born Dec 9 1871

William Schenck - born 1839 - died in his fifth year

Robert Barclay - born Dec 25 1840 - studied law - of much promise -

died - 18 Nov 1862 - unmarried

Augustus Schenck - born 26 Nov 1844 - married Mary Ellen Morgan - 28 May 1884

Issue - Frederick - born 31 Dec 1885 - always lived in Pokeepsie

Edmund - born 15 Aug 1848 - died young

Willie - born 9 Oct 1854 - died 14th year

Perry - born 1858 - died young -

Note by N.W.S. - There never lived a kinder hearted or more charitable man than William A. Fanning. Everyone who has lived in Pokeepsie NY from 1835 to his death 14 Jan 1887 - knew "Bill Fanning". He was Chairman Board of Health and done much service and gave much relief to the sufferers from the cholera epidemic in 1849. Country Clerk Dutchess Co - 2 terms - an estimable citizen - fast and fun friend - always helpful to the needy - highly respected - honored and beloved - one of the "salt of the earth". He will have his reward - Aunt Kezia always love and kindness to me.

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*My Mother - Eliza Ann - 1st daughter and 2nd child of William Fanning born 1750 - and Nancy Simmons

My Mother Eliza Ann Fanning was born at Brooklyn NY - 4 Oct 1805 Married William Schenck - merchant of Brooklyn - 1824

Issue- Adaline Fanning Schenck - born Brooklyn NY - 25 Jan 1825 - died Brooklyn 1910

Aletta Jane Schenck - born Brooklyn NY (I think July) 1827 - died Brooklyn March 23 1906

Nicholas William Schenck - born Brooklyn NY - 8 Jan 1830

Note NWS - My mother resided in Brooklyn - late May 1836 - my father (William) - died 15 March 1832. In May 1836 - we (mother - sister and I) took passage for Wilmington NC as had been arranged to live with our Uncle Phineas Wines Fanning - brother to my Grandfather William Fanning. There my sister lived until 1840 - when they went to Pokeepsie - to go to school. Mother went to Pokeepsie NY - in 1852 and lived in Pokeepsie and Brooklyn the remainder of her life - died 105 2nd Place - Brooklyn LI - Dec 21 1884.

Note NWS - William Schenck - (my father) - son of Nicholas Schenck and Aletta ( ) born at Canarsie LI - 20th Aug 1797 - moved to Brooklyn - carried on business in Fulton Street - North side - just opposite with Henry Street Commons - married and died - see record above. At my age - could have no recollection of my father - his miniature - in possession sister Adeline Bromley.

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Note NWS - My sister Adaline Fanning - named for cousin Adaline - daughter John Coffin Fanning - 1st child Eliza Ann Fanning and William Schenck - born 25 Jan 1825. Went to Wilmington NC - May 1836 - with family - lived with Uncle Phineas - later coming to Pokeepsie about 1841 - resided with Uncle William A. and Aunt Kezia Fanning - attended seminary- Doc and Prof Wright - after completion of education - went to Canarsie LI and lived with Grandmother Aletta ( ) Schenck. Married Isaac WR (Bromley) lawyer - widower with 2 children - Miles S. and Margaret - 4th Oct 1854 - at cousin Ann ( ) house - in Brooklyn.

Died Jan 11 1910 at 105 2nd Place - Brooklyn NY.

Issue - John Schenck - died in infancy

Frances Pearsall - born 1856 - died Dec 29 1939 - buried Greenwood Cemetery- Brooklyn

Edmund Pearsall - born 1860 - died 1936

IWR Bromley - born Plattesburg NY - 5 July 1806 - his first wife was Standish

Issue - Miles Standish Bromley - born - Married - Margaret - daughter - Rev and _______ Kisiani of Schenectady NY - who was the only sister of the wife of William H. Vanderbilt - son of Cornelius (Senior) - no issue

Margaret - born - Married - Charles Greene of Providence RI

No issue - She died suddenly in 1904 - from fright - from automobile - in the street - Providence RI

IWRB - died in Brooklyn 1892 - buried "Greenwood"

Frances P and Edward P were named for the Pearsall family of New York - being clients of IWRB - for said names - there children then - came into a good legacy - from Pearsall family - Edmund P went with Morgan and CO. - New York office - when a lad and is now head official of the Financial departments (Nov 1905).

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Note by NWS-

My sister Aletta Jane Schenck - 2nd child and daughter - William Schenck and Eliza Ann Fanning - born - Brooklyn NY - July 1827 - lived in Wilmington NC with mother and Uncle Phineas Fanning 1836-1841 - came to Pokeepsie - to finish education - lived with Uncle William A. and Kezia Fanning - graduated at Prof. Wright Academy - them came to Canarsie LI - lived with Grandmother Aletta Remseaur Schenck.

Aletta Jane was named for her father William Schenck's mother Aletta and the Jane was for Jane ( ) Remseaur - mother of Aletta Schenck and wife of Anthony Remseaur - she lived at Canarsie LI and Brooklyn - till her marriage to Dr. Jno. Reed Cooper in 1853 - at the Brooklyn residence of cousin Ann ( ) whose mother was great-grand daughter- Nicholas Schenck niece - named Hettie - daughter of John - went to Pokeepsie at once - Dr. Jno. R. Cooper - in medical practice with his father - resided there till JR death in 1891 - in his 63 yr - (only one son)

Issue - William Schenck Cooper - born about 1854 or 1855

Sister Aletta died March 23 1906 - Schenk - Cooper - buried - "Greenwood" Cemetery - Brooklyn NY.

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Nicholas W. Schenck - only son of William Schenck and Eliza Ann Fanning -

(died May 12 1916 - buried in Oakdale Cemetery - Wilmington NC)

Born 8 Jan 1830 - Brooklyn New York - North side of Fulton Street - opposite Henry Street- (building replaced by David C. Cooper - brick building)-

Father William died 15 March 1832 - as arranged went to Wilmington North Carolina - in May 1836 - by sea (Schooner Charles E. Thom) - Capt. Sanford - with mother and sister - (stayed at first with Jno .M and Zara Cazaux - friends of Uncle PW Fanning) - to live with my great Uncle Phineas Wines Fanning - younger brother of my grandfather William Fanning. Uncle Phineas soon provided a house - on Orange Street - south side - between 2nd and 3rd Street - and I lived with him - till about 1852.

First school - Miss Laura Rankin - later Rothwell - schoolhouse in (1838) Northrop Alley - School for children and more advanced scholars - girls 10/15 - boys 12/16 - of the young ladies as then - I recall in names and appearance (now 1905) - Misses Augusta Law - Clarissa and Caroline Northup - Frances Lippitt - Sarah and Mary Savage - my sister - Caroline Van Viel - Emily Howard - Susan - Martha and Sarah Black - Sarah Peck - of bigger boys - George Harris - Mike Cronley - Eli Hall - Spicer boys and others - Miss Laura from my memory was too strict and sometimes cruel - whippings abundant. My seat was in a sort of crib in the middle of the room - prayers every morning and singing - I recall a verse - as it still sounds in my ears - "While I live - I do not think - I will ever learn to drink - Brandy - Whiskey - Gin or Rum - or anything to make drunk come". Washington Temperance Society - in full blast those days - may explain the song.

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Not many years at Miss Laura School - too bad in the way of mischief - Jess Mulock - Orange - New York - comes on the scene - proposes to open a school for boys - Uncle Phineas soon took up with Mulock - coached him and gave every assistance - of course - Nick was enrolled at Mulocks - I must have been well advanced for my years - as I at once commenced - "Smith Arithmetic" -"Smith Geography" -"State" - books bought of Wright and Savage - (1839) - then store north side Market Street - few room from Front - Jas. T. Burr clerk there - School room - 1 story wooden house - on site now occupied by Burr and Bailey store - Front Street - moved across the street - in home north side of alley - moved again to rooms that had been occupied by Wilmington Advertiser Newspaper - (Fred C. Hill - Edenton) - over George R. French shoe store - south side Market Street. The school entrance was by an alley - out of Front Street - between Dr. John D. Bellamy office and William Destract bake shop and opposite Isaac Gilliam (Negro) cleaning shop. I was one of Mulock Scholars from first to last - the entire years he taught in Wilmington - and about from 1837 - 1845. "Jesse Mulock" was a model teacher - strict -firm - disciplinary - at same time patient - helpful - long suffering with dull boys and if there was anything in a boy - Mulock would find it and put the polish on it. "Learn you must" -"study you must" - "be diligent". As has come over from the ages - "spare the rod and spoil the boy" - found it full of significance for dunces and bad boys - Mulock's big bunch of seasoned Chinquapin switches - 3 feet long - that was always left in stock for handy use - when needed. Mulock being ambidextrous and powerful could play the bunch to advantage - no boy ever conquered Jesse Mulock - x

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The Odd Fellows Society started a school - next to City Hall (later Meginny) - with M. Laughlin teacher and at a low rate of tuition and same fee - drove Mulock from the field - he went with merchandising - and had Richard Langdon and A.D. Cazaux for clerks - finally went to New York - was engaged in one of the Bible Houses - lived to an old age and died in Orange NY - peace to his ashes.

I went into Uncle paint store and clerked - later went 1 year to school in Classical Department of the Odd Fellows School - (L. Meginny - Principal). Robert Lindsay - classical teacher - the boys in my class (1847) - Owen Fennel - John McLaurin - Robert B. McRae - Sidney G. Law - in the afternoons we recited with the young ladies of Miss Richardson Class - in the higher branches - forming one class - (Lindsay instructor). I recall Caroline and Margaret McRae - Jane London - Julia Savage - Emma Ballard - Hoskins sisters (2) - Bryan sisters (2) - Harriet Hawthorn - Annie Wade - _______________-in all some 20 (15-18 yrs) old.

Lindsay went to Tarboro as Principal of Academy and sent for me Oct 1848 to come and assist him in the Primary Department - I went and boarded with George Howard and family - 3 sons and 5 daughters. Howard kept house - table board only - I was only border - had good room

fire when called for - lights - washing and mending - boy to wait on me - most excellent table - fine cooking - old style - a super abundance of good things - paid $8.00 for month - (eight dollars for month) - excellent society. The old fashioned chills and fever got into my system - Dr. William G. Thomas ( )Wilmington- lived in Tarboro and he ordered my going home - believing change would cure. Uncle and Mother decided to send me North - hence in May 1849 -with Ezra (wife) Wood and 2 babies - took passage in vessel - after a sea-sick voyage - landed at Jonathan Schenck ( ) store and house No. 23 Fulton Drive - Brooklyn - Cousin Ann ( )

(maiden) keeping home upstairs - There I stayed - until cousin Schenck brought over and introduced Dominicus Van de Veer - (a beau of Adaline's)-

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who kindly drove me to Canarsie LI- where I met Grandmother Aletta and Uncle James Schenck and my sisters - Van de Veer and I had planned to see if they recognize me - as we drove into the barn - (about 4 PM) sisters and Lucretia Schenck were coming out of the house to walk over to Aunt Annie's (Jere and Richard?) Schenck's mother - I was introduced as Mr. Smith from New York City - we all passed into the fields - over to Aunt Annie's and returned to the house - in all over an hour. As Van de Veer was preparing to leave soon - at proper time - I made myself known - the surprise and welcome cannot be described.

Spending some time here - to Brooklyn and New York often - visiting Pokeepsie - Newburg and other places - saw all my kin - returned to Wilmington in November 1849. Clerked in Uncle's store and afterward when he turned his business over to Jonathan A. Parker. Parker was a boy raised by Uncle Phineas - he prepared me to keep his books and mail his letters - he would give me a good furnished room in his home and my board - I became very tired and lonesome living with Uncle (since Mother had gone North) - a bachelor quarters - seldom met Uncle at any meal - he had no regular hours - any time and no time. We had a colored cook and a boy that follow Uncle - foot to foot - and as for messenger - so consulting Uncle and he agreeing - I went to Parker and lived till married Nov 1858-

Uncle Phineas had a great fancy for taking poor boys (orphans) - to learn his trade (painting) and sent them to night school - in his time he has reared and had 20 apprentices - Parker married a Miss Almay from Wayne County. Mrs. Parker (Margaret) graduated St. Mary's - Raleigh - and her mother had some means - stranger things have happened - than her marrying Parker - some things we can't account for - now Parker was a plain - ordinary - good sort of a fellow - industrious - but he had few opportunities. Any way - I was soon in favor with Mrs. Parker and her mother - and through many years -

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I enjoyed their hospitality - nothing but kindness came to me. In 1852 I went to clerk and as book keeper and confidential man - with George Myers - groceries - liquors - cigars and millenary - at stand now held by Jno. Boatwright - 1st year salary 800 dollars - my opportunity for saving money was good - for my living was nominal - board costing me - nothing in money. It's the same old story - with all young people - money spent as fast as made - but mind - one thing - "Never in Debt" - always had some money on hand - and ahead. Remained with Myers till 1856 - traveled Brooklyn - New York again - 1851- 1854

1856 - spending 6 to 16 weeks - at time - always went by rail and bag line - coming home in 1856 - went with B&D again - as packet clerk - before this however in 1852 - I was 6 months with J.C. and R. B. Wood (my cousins) - as Cousin John showed by his conduct - I was in his way - Cousin Robert desired me to continue - but I quit - and never received a dime for my services - then I was short time - 4 mos with David Carthwell (Com. Merchant) - years after I made claim on him for my services - he wrote me he was "poor" and could not then pay - acknowledged the debt - so I released him and forgave the claim.

(From side of page 22)

In New York - Nov 1851 - witnessed the Kossuth demonstration with Cousin Robert B. Wood and Henry A. Haines - afterward we went to Pokeepsie and visited Uncle William and Aunt Kezia Fanning and Phoebe.

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These were my young days - 1840 - 1857 - days of frolic - dancing - "The Wild Oat Days" -so called and as all young fellows - I sowed my oats - and left them - days of going to see the "girls" "dancing school"- "sound parties" - "house frolics" - "moonlight excursions" - "serenades" and "music" - everything contributing to pleasure - spending money in dress - good clothes - candy and flowers - all fun calls for money - so it was spent. Then came the attraction of the beautiful girl - love - courtship - and the successful climax in marriage to Mary Eliza Morris - eldest daughter Richard Morris and Johanna Yonges - Nov 3 1858 at St. James Episcopal Church -

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2PM - Rev. Robert Bent Drane - DI - officiating. Many invites given (600) and hence covered church. Cousin Jo Nixon and Chas W. Morris assisted - train for New York via W & W RR at 3 PM - friends and kin at depot. Cousin Jane Bradley - who was very fond of Mary - have assisted best very maternally in making dresses and other outfits - during the summer of 1848 - Mary spending much time there - with daughters - Amoret and Eliza - took occasion to give me - privately some motherly advice and caution - as to new conditions - not to be {mentioned/repeated} here.

Arrived NY - St. Nicholas Hotel - 3 days and then by steamer to Pokeepsie - to stay at Dr. Jno. Cooper (sister Aletta and mother) - Willie was a little boy - I should think about 4 yrs old - which places his birth in 1854 and hence I think Aletta was married fall 1853 and not 1855 (as Books record has it - in "History Fanning Family"). Remained North Nov and until Dec 15 - visiting Brooklyn and Pokeepsie kin - returned home and lived - as insisted by Mr. Morris - in house - SE corner Dock and Front St - Wilmington - NC until October 1 -1859 - then went to housekeeping on Market Street - between 7th and 8th - sout side - next to Joseph Burr and west of Charles D. Myers - who had married Lassie DeRosset - same week - furniture - sister Aletta had purchased in NY and sent out by vessel - same week - Harriett C. Hawthorn (my cousin) married N. Green Daniel 12 O'clock same day (by Dr. Drane) - Lassie DeRosset marries Charles D. Myers - later in week Col. Edward Dudley Hall marries Lunnie Green - youngest daughter Joseph Swann Green, Esq - date of November 3rd - 1858. ( )

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Minnie Cooper - was born at home of the Morris' - in house SE corner Dock and Front Street - known as the Mrs. Joe Hill house - about 2 AM - early morning August 1 1859 - Dr. Joseph H. Dickson officiating- Mary could not suckle the Babe - so after every experiment of - pump - ( ) - and other woman's devices - the wet nurse had to come - Mrs. Warren - (daughter old Mrs. Stewart) - came daily and gave the essential nourishment - until I was able to procure - a black girl - Eliza by name - a young genuine Negro girl - of about 20 yrs old - who had lost her child - for this service - I paid Fred. J. Lord - "20 - dollars for month" - for nearly 1 years - who was owner of the slave Eliza - Eliza had a fine physique- splendid teeth - of the genuine black in color - under Mary's orders - she bathed daily - also cleaned her teeth - hair cut close - and in every way - clean - neat - good dresses and clothes came provided - and Eliza became - as one of the family - for cook - we had - Aunt Phillis - slave of Aunt Davis - paid Aunt Davis "$100 - for year" - old Abram - her husband who stayed on the lot and was fed.- Phillis - excellent cook - neat and industrious servant - so housekeeping run smooth - I had the entire inside painted and ( ) - all new furniture - Happy hours - blessed our house -

I fell out with Cazaux - about a matter - and left his employment - Dec 29th - Alva Burr - an old friend and dear - who with his parents and sisters and brothers - then lived corner 8th and Market - died Dec 31 - 1859 - buried in Oakdale - I was one of the pallbearers - he was 8 yrs my senior - Alva -(or Prince as called) was book keeper for DeRosset and Brown - on morning Jan 2nd - 1860 - Jim Telfair (Negro porter) for DeRosset and Brown - came to house with this message to me-

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"Mass' Armand sends his compliments and asks for Mr. Schenck - to call at the office - this morning immediately after his breakfast" - we were at the breakfast table - I told Mary - and she asked me - what will you do - my reply "I will call - but don't think I will take Burr's place - as I think that is what Dr. DeRosset wants" - Mary said "Why" - "Fear I am not competent - as Alva Burr - was one of the best book keepers - DeRosset and Brown are particular - hard to please - I fear - and the work is heavy" - after awhile - Mary said - "you are out of employment - you are fully competent and now for my sake accept - and make the trial"- meal over - made ready to start - kissed Mary (as my rule and custom was always to kiss and embrace her on my coming home and my going to business) The parting promise to her was -"I will accept the place" - Interview the Dr. (private office of DeRosset and Brown) after expressing my fears and incompetency - Dr. DeRosset said - "I sent for you - because Mr. Burr had recommended you - we want a man - who can keep silence and we have no fears as to your ability - I will help you and show you ways on Mr. Burr's method - all I ask of you is to try"-

I said I would "try" - DeRosset replied "( ) pay will be (1500 per year) and increase - when can you begin?" - He replied - "Come tomorrow morning at 8 AM" -

Return home - Mary rejoiced and happy and spent the day at home - Mary and baby Minnie -

Commenced with DeRosset and Brown - January 2 - 1860 - and I may here - say - I was fully satisfied - pleased my employers - made lifetime and warm friends of Dr. AJ DeRosset and R. Frank Brown - as I am sure from their offers of assistance - recommendations - and an event with Mr. Frank Brown - in 1865 - will fully prove. Told in another place.

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Resigned from DeRosset and Brown employment - by reason of the approaching war - May - 1861 - against strong protest from Mr. Frank Brown. Nothing doing and ( ) dull - did not want to take pay and no work -

Lyda - Eliza Fanning named for my mother - was born September 19 1860 - at house of grand parents Richard and Johanna Morris (known after as "St. James House" - situated beyond 8th Street and then just outside town limits) about 3 PM - word was brought to me - at DeRosset and Brown - office - Mary had no trouble - and hence nursed Lyda - moved in November to house - SW - corner of Chestnut and 8th (as ? Hansley - went back on his word of honor and raised the rent $50.00 additional - on his Market Street house - after I had expended fully 100 dollars of my money to clean it up and make improvements) -

Hence my move - rented new quarters from Luke Huggins at $150.00 for year - "Phillis" continued as cook - we had a lot - 70 x 360 - garden and plenty chickens. I had a neighbor - who feasted on my stock - as he cut a hole in his fence - and enticed them in and slew - then again - we had borrowers - here is one instance out of many - servant comes and says "Old Miss - send her compliments - and ask you how I'm is today - and how is Mass Nick - and the children" "Miss Minnie and Miss Lyda - and ask you - if you please wont lend her - a ham for dinner and if you aint got a ham - please send her a pair of fowls" - Mary - would almost always - lend - as Phillis told me - "Mass Nick - if you don't stop Miss Mary she will lend all you got - and break you" - This time however - no hams in house - and Mary sent excuse - "Mr Schenck would not allow the chickens killed for his own table" - However this didn't stop - the borrowing from same party as it continued and we had many messages - while at sound (1865) - Mrs. Morris once had occasion to send all the biscuits- off the breakfast table - when some old servant - came with - "Compliments to ( )" this morning was - so very common - every day also - servant came -

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War aloud began to arise - over the South - Finally commerce and mail were suspended - business dead - hence I notified Dr. DeRosset - that I would resign and stop - Doctor son Louis came home from New York - Dr. Jonathan home - Armand who and all his sons at home - dull was no name for the times - so far as business goes - Mr. Brown opposed my idea said the war would be over in 90 days - and things would be restored - he said to me - "If we choose to pay you - to do nothing - what matters - I want you to stay - reminded me I had family and said what will you do" - As it was - I left them in May 1861 - spent a week holiday at Burr's place on sound - with Charles Burr and Charles Morris - Sumter was fired on - North Carolina agreed to stay in the Union and soon after changed and want out - "seceded"-

Gov. Ellis called out soldiers - forts taken and defenses begun - Henry M. Drane - was appointed - A.C.S. - by Gov. Ellis and he employed me to assist him - Drane said - "Nick - I can only give you the lowest place in my office - pay 50 as mo. Ration - the War was on - troops raised and some fighting later - "Bethel" - "Bull Run" and so on -

Yellow fever - was brought to Wilmington NC by Blockade Runner steamer Kate - who landed 2 sick seamen - below Kidders Mill - they died and the Negroes - who nursed those sailors died - this was in early July - 1862 - There was no word of yellow fever - no knowledge or apprehension - though later it was known to exist and a week ( ) several mysterious cases of Death - yet no fear or thought of this dread disease - until Heyer - brother of Jonathan C. Heyer - died suddenly in late August or September - when Doctors Dickson and Thomas - medical record and the faculty - pronounced that Heyer had - black vomit - the dread news - soon spread - quarantine put on -

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and soon - a panic to get away - citizens and family - going in all directions - Fayetteville - (Sumter) - the sound - Smithville - Clinton and every point - general sanitary measures commenced - a general clean-up - use of disinfectant - burning of tar barrels in the street - spreading lime - Every body - who could get away - left town - I being in the Army - obtained furlough - with Mary - Minnie - Lyda - (Richard - who was born Feb 15 1862) - left Wilmington NC in 3 PM for Clinton - via Warsaw - Arrangements by letter had been made with Rev. George M. Gibbs (cousin George) - he wrote -"come - will do best we can for you"-

Arrived at Warsaw - about dark - every hotel quarantined against us - coming from Wilmington - fortunately Dr. William Harris and family was at Warsaw and he very kindly - got William Powell of Clinton - who was going home that night - to take us in his carriage - a drive of 12 miles or more - we arrived safe and sound at Cousin George and ( ) house - about midnight-

I remained 10 days and returned to Wilmington N.C. - to find almost a deserted town - stopped over night on my return - with "Southerland" - a friend at Warsaw and came in train next day with- only S.D. Wallace - President of W&W RR and Sam Potter - none others - travel cut off- Sam left train at Smith's Creek - walked over to G.J. Hill's place and took boat (canoe) for his home on North West River -

Arrived in Wilmington NC about 11 O'clock AM - every house on Front Street - closed and shut-up - did not met or see a soul - till coming to head of Market - in a group - stood - Capt. Maffitt - Tobe Lucas and Jake Kezier - I made for the Commissary office - were I found Capt. Drane - Charles Haines - Daniel Haines and James Lippitt - (William ( ) in Fayetteville) -

lodged with Haines and Haines - at - Jesse Bowden's house NE corner - Princess and 4th Streets - Daniel Haines had the yellow fever there - I nursed him for 2 weeks - until help came - Haines had gotten permission - to go into the country - and did not return - Capt Drane lived with his father (Rev. R.B. Drane) at the Rectory - Market Street - where later Dr. Drane died - At another time I will detail about the fever.

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Richard (1st son) died of croup - at Clinton NC (buried there) - April 10 -1863 - about 14 mos old - This sad event called me to Clinton - where I remained 12 days - at this time living with Cousin George Gibbs - were his wife - 2 daughters - 2 sons - Aunt Susan Fleming - maiden lady - Josie Church Gibbs and one child - boy (died there later) - Robert Morgan - brother to Mrs. Gibbs - Mary and 2 children - besides 2 young girl boarders - at school ( )-

Adam Empie Gibbs - then living at Burr's home - sound place - (Greenville Sound) - making salt - which exempted him from military service - as also - he had a friend at Raleigh - in person of Col. Peter Mallett - (his brother - in - law) head of NC (Conscription) Bureau -

"Yellow Fever" subsided in Wilmington - as we had - Ice - freeze and heavy frost on morning 8 November - 1862 - I had passed through the fever - in Oct and Nov - 1862 - and recovered - as also had Uncle Phineas and Dan Haines - (more of particulars - in Yellow Fever Epidemic 1862 - see in another place) - At this date I was convalescing.

Lt. Col Charles E. Thorburn - C.S.A. - occupied my house - as furnished - most of 1863 - as Mary and children remained in Clinton - for the time and I brought them to Wilmington - in Oct 1863 - and we lodged with Uncle P.W.F. - in the T.W. Brown house on Orange Street - before Christmas we moved to our own quarters - Mrs Thorburn later going to Richmond - This house - was the Capt. C.D. Ellis house - his son-in-law - Henry Russell - had lived there and died 1859- situated on Church Street - near Mr. Morris - we moved there - early on in 1861 - as Capt Ellis offered me the house at a sacrifice rent ($100)-because as he said he wanted me for the care I would take of the property and because his daughters (3) and wife and himself - wished us for neighbors - (friends of Mary).

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Ada B- named for my eldest sister - Adaline F- born - January 12 - 1864 - about midnight - Dr. Joseph H. Dickson - officiating - now living in the "Ellis House" - on Nun Street - Wilmington NC - Empie Gibbs and wife Josephine - living part of the time in Clinton and sound - now moved and lived in the north part - on the hills - beyond Chadbourn Mill - Josephine taken with fever - was removed to my house - attended by Doctors Munsey and Freeman ( ) - long spell of old time bilious fever - faithfully nursed by Mary and every comfort - made possible - contributed - recovered and lived under my roof - fully 18 mos and in addition - Empie's Negro woman and child - and stable his horse - in lot - All lived happily-

Mr. Morris and wife - Caroline and Maggie - Richard and ( ) and Bettie Lelia - Jno. R.C. - in Army - Sue married - Mr. Morris moved to the sound - early in the year - (Wrightsville) - self - Mary and children went down in July 1864 to spend 10 days - resulted in my renting Dr. Cultan's 3 room cottage - (200 yards from Mr. Morris) - $25.00 - for mo. In Confederate money and staying till early in November. I had a rising on my foot - from sun and salt water - Got 60 days furlough - on ( ) - Gen. Whiting allowing me to go and come - to town - or sound - as I pleased - with orders to attend and see business - was OK - Capt. Drane resigned in 1863 - to become Superintendent of Wilmington- Manchester to RR - and I was appointed and commissioned - by A.( ) - and assumed charge at once - by special order - Gen. W.H.C. Whiting -Major General - Department of North Carolina - Jonathan A. Taylor and N.N. Nixon in my bond 60.000- Title Captain - A.C.S. - Confederate Army.

Note - Yellow fever - prevailed at New Bern N.C. - Sept and Oct - 1864- New Bern NC in hands of US troops - garrisoned by 44th Mass - 3rd Mass - 25th Mass - 17th Mass - 132 N. York - 15 Conn 3rd New York - 2nd Mass - and some NC renegade troops - 51 Penn - about 1300 deaths - largely of soldiers - fever came by vessels from Sp. West Indies - by 10 Oct - city was almost deserted - see "Great Epidemic New Bern and records - Sept - Oct 1864 - by W.S. Benjamen"

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Came to town from Wrightsville Sound - moved up - about the 10th November 1864 - in our carry-all (with 2 mules and driver - we brought to town Mrs. Alice Lippert and her daughter Mary - and Mary and 3 children - and servant girl - Fire occurred in Dave Worth's stable - night of Nov 30th - about 9 PM - before midnight our house was destroyed with some others - moved every thing only lost one silver spoon and some crockery broken. Mrs. Gov. Dudley and her daughter - Caroline Cowan Green - living on diagonal corner - gave us shelter for the night and we lodged with them for four days - until we could move in Mrs. Morris house - then vacant - On that night I was writing up my returns - Mary had retired and so had 3 children - Fire was cried - we were in Mary's room - when the servant girl raised the window and said the fire is right here - Worth's stable 100 feet away - was in full blaze - Engines were slow - water scarce - fire had it sweep for a time - I delayed moving - our house having tin roof - till the glass in windows began to pop - when Uncle P.W.F. and Cousin Robert Wood - advised moving - on request Gen. Bragg - detailed a guard - the moved was made across the street - into Dudley lot and next was Mr. Morris - housed and guarded by military - till key came from sound and we moved in - Ada was- 11 months old - sleeping in bed - I wrapped her in a blanket - Mary looked after Minnie and Lyda - with the servant - Mrs. Green came over and insisted on our going to her Mother's house - and there we soon landed - Mrs. Green giving up her room - Mary returned with me to the house - leaving children in charge of Mrs. G. - went to work packing valuables for a move - friends soon came and I locked the doors -

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admitting only a few - this prevented the "Rabble" from coming in - saved our effects - Mr. Morris and family came to town later - I moved to the (Jim) Gardner house - and in February - 1865 - Uncle Nixon and Aunt Nixon - (came from Laurinburg NC - where he and family and Negroes had refuged) and insisted on our moving into her large brick house - (Chestnut Street) - to protect his property - we moved -

Fort Fisher had been attacked by Federal Fleet and troops under Gen. B. F. Bullar - Christmas Day 1864 - Uncle Sam renewed the attack in force in January 1865- and after fierce bombardment and assault - carried the works - this was bringing the "War" near home - hence - on eve 22 Feb - 1865 - Wilmington was evacuated - My duty was to follow "our flag" though many did not - so I said - Good bye and kisses to Mary and my jewels - Minnie - Lyda and Ada - and left - About 6 PM - en route - via Lilly Bridge - to the North East ferry - and crossed the river on pontoons near midnight and escaped miles beyond - my first - night slept - on the ground - blanket wrapped - with me was Capt. McKinney - Albert Baldwin - Zander Swann - son Dr. Jno. and 2 Negro men - Ned Moore - (afterward Capt E.J. Moore) had a furlough to go to his wedding - at Jno. ( ) Brown- up the Cape Fear - to marry - _____Brown - a daughter of Asa A. Brown - as agreed he met me - at Goldsboro - Capt. McKinney and Baldwin - family having gone to Fayetteville N.C. and rumor of trouble there from the Yankee soldiers - by permission - left me - taking the overland route for Fayetteville - N.C. - On moon rise - night Feb 22 - our forces had a sharp skirmish - with the Federal Negro Troops - that had been pushed against us on our retreat - Many Negroes - were killed and wounded and did not cross N. East River - after in pursuit -

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Next day Major Reed put me in command 10,000 Federal prisoners - (so said) - which had been run down to our lines - in certification of exchange and delivery to Federal officers - the Yankee Gen in command - said at war no time to attend to prisoners - but our order from Gen. U.S. Grant - over ruled and the men were run into Wilmington- N.C. - later by ships to New York. Next day - continued retreat - about sunrise - after our camp breakfast - saw Gen Bragg and some of his staff coming up our road - it was proposed to ask the Gen. to indulge us a glass of good cheer - He readily accepted - gave us his thanks and best wishes and rode on - with others - ordered to report at Magnolia - N.C. - started with a line long of mules - drays - wagons and servants - reached a school house - after dark - in the ( ) was - over 40 - white and black - big fire made - good supper - and soon all hands were stretched on the floor - all had blankets - Negro servant to keep up fire -

I recall Dr. Josh Walker - (he was instrumental in my being sent along) - Rev. W. (Chaplain) - Guilford Dudley - Capt. Huggins - Capt Kit Styron - my clerk Swann - early start after breakfast - brought in to Magnolia - order came to me to report to Goldsboro N.C. - next train carried me and I reported to Major Morrison - (brother to Mrs. Stonewall Jackson) - he assigned me to light duty - provided quarters with Capt. Mure -

While in Goldsboro - our forces had fight at Kinston and brought in 1500 prisoners - orders came from Gen. Braxton Bragg - to take train provisions? - ( ) - ( ) and with guard - started and side tracked at Rose Hill - for the night - one of the guard - a boy 18 - came to me and said Captain - my parents live here - and took permission to go stay all night - after consulting Sargent in command - allowed him to go - he soon came back with message from his father and mother - to come to supper and spend the night - accepted and was well received-

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Daily start next morning - reached Selma (then Mitchner's Depot) - when I had orders to unload - take the railroad depot - and any and all buildings necessary for this end -"Establishing a Depot of Supplies" - I found Maj. Gen. Bate - with a Tennessee command -(part of Hook's army)- tented in the woods near by - called on Gen.- showed orders - and he gave me all the help asked for - while I gave him - many good things - among others coffee and sugar ( a rarity to soldiers in that day) - The Gen. and his staff - were soon my fast friends -

The detail of 20 men - under sub officers - soon reported and in few hours - had the RR warehouse - cleared and train unloaded and stored - the county RR agent - was at first disposed - not to comply - but I soon told him don't compel me to use force - we can get along nicely - but I must carry out my orders - so I had the unclaimed put in warehouse - carefully stored - the Agent next day vacated his dwelling and moved over to Smithfield - a mile or so away - and requested me to occupy his house - I made it my Head Quarters and sleeping apartment for self and clerks - "Ned Moore" had returned and with "Swann" and 2 Negroes - work going on - In a day or so - called an officer - then introduced himself as Major Morse of Gen. Jos. E. Johnson staff - saw my orders and next day - called again with new orders from Gen. Johnson - as Gen Bragg had been retired..

Major Moore invited me to his tent - in the woods near by - and set out his best - our business thereafter was harmonious and he took much interest in me - told me - he wished his - subordinates - A.C.S - had the go and verve - I had - I put him on many bags of corn and fodder stacks and ( ) - and we had plenty to eat - man and beast - we remained here -say March 1 - till after battle of Bentonville N.C. - Sunday April 1865.

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Going back on my narrative - while in Goldsboro - I was ordered to take train of cars - Walter McRae (Col. Jno.son) in charge - and go down the road as far as Magnolia or farther and collected and bring away - all the supplies - being the Tax (as) kind - stored at Depots and etc - Remember the Confederate Congress - passed a law - assessing a 10% Tax - on all the farmers products (corn - grains - potatoes etc) instead of a money tax - as this products were gathered and stored at most convenient points - especially at Depot points - I established my Head Quarters - at Magnolia - with (Love) - stayed at his house - in addition - I was to impress all the Mills - and corn ground into meal - and to those work night and day and ship as fast as possible - I was about 2 weeks at this work - while at Magnolia - Col. James G. Burr - skeleton regiment was there - Charles D. Myers - Adgt. - what there was of this Regiment came out of Wilmington - on evacuation - 22 Feb 1865 - I recall others W.L.Smith Lt. Col - Capt. Alex McRae Jr. - Dr. A.G. Bradley - Surgeon and privates - DM McRae - Charles E. Burr - Joseph McLaurin - George W. Rose - Jas. Ryan - and others - It was - Infantry - but from the number of horses - wagons and vehicles - anything ( ) as there were more of the latter - than officers and men - A Falstaffer Comm. - Col.Burr's Regiment - was sort of a home guard - and contained almost every available man who could carry a gun - all the exempts from conscription - but when it came to taking the field - not one in forty - went out - stayed at home - after Fisher fell - the cause was considered "Lost" - and the end came very soon - Lee followed in April - Hood was badly whipped in Tenn. - Joe Johnson - concluded his peace in late April - my parole was signed Greensboro- May 1 - 1865 - and soon homeward bound - I think everybody was glad - when end came - at that time - The Confederacy had made a good long fight ( ).

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There was plenty of work at Selma Depot - cars coming almost every hour - with supplies - some to unload - others to go to Raleigh and so on - troops began to come - and soon we had it said an army of 30,000 men - of all branches - Infantry - Calvary - Artillery- etc. Gen. Johnson had a grand review and it was a fine sight - Sherman's Army had replied at Greensboro - and made some move against Johnson - Gen. Blair - was coming towards the East - as of Gen. Sherman's army corps - Kilpatrick was raiding - one Gen.Wade Hampton - met his K Comm. and a fight near Fayetteville - Gen. Johnson determined to attack some moving command - "Blair" - (I think) the conflict began at or near Bentonville NC - in April - on a Sunday morning - we could hear the guns very distinct at Selma - Johnson drove them back miles - but over powering numbers came out - Johnson retreated - Zach Ellis killed - body never found - Col. Jno.D. Taylor - lost his right arm - Capt. R.G. Rankin and other of McRae battalion wounded and died of wounds - as this Battalion ( ) suffered heavily- I administered all comfort in my power - while he rested - badly wounded at Selma Depot. Afterward convoyed to Raleigh - where he died at home of Col. D.K. McRae - I happened to be in Raleigh and attended his burial - short time Johnson - gave orders and in few days - the troops were en route - via highway - a foot to Raleigh N.C. - Major Moore - had intended for me to be ready to move - soon he gave me orders to take my 3 (teams) and stop at a "Big Oak Tree" - fork of road - east side of Neuse River - and there await his Major Moore orders - by 3 PM - troops had all passed and no order from Major Moore - country around was quiet - becoming anxious - I dispatched Capt Ned Moore ( up the road?) -

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to find Major Moore - and ask him for orders - as to good luck - Ned Moore returned in an hour - found Major Moore - brought his apologies - with "orders" to return to Selma Depot - turn over my stock wagon to Quarter master - take train next day and report - to Greensboro N.C.-

Here was relief - nights rest - next day reported to Capt. Wm.( ) (N.O. Command) - who after wards turned to be an old school mate at Jesse Mulock school 1840/46 - Wilmington NC - and had moved to New Orleans and joined the Army in 1861 - Every thing being cleaned up -cars all loaded - "Quirk" told me be prepared to leave about noon - time came - all things ready - all aboard - just ready to start - when in the distance - could be seen a man and woman in a buggy - horse on run and the man waving his hat - I said to Quirk - "let us see what that means" and waited - soon drove up an officer - lady and baby - who soon saluted me - "Captain just the man I want to see" - This proved to be Col. Jno. Anderson - in command Regiment "Junior Reserves" - boys 12 to 17 - the lady his wife - daughter Honorable Jas. Dobbins - former Secretary of U.S. Navy - under ___ and their infant daughter - "Lizzie" - 1st child - about 6 mos old- Col. Anderson requested me to see Mrs. Anderson and child - safe at Raleigh N.C. - In a few minutes we were off - Mrs. A - expressed her good luck - now our accommodations was a box car and possibly bags of corn meal for seats - black - dirty - smoked - and a jolty ride - but we arrived in Raleigh before dark - and I saw Mrs. Anderson and child - safe among her friends - I later met Col. And Mrs. Anderson in Brooklyn - and later Miss Lizzie as a young lady - saw - invited and entertained Mrs. Anderson (after death Col. Jno.) - she was 1st cousin to Annie Holmes Schenck - my wife- as Annie father "Owen" and Mrs. Dobbins were sisters - home before the war - Fayetteville NC

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After leaving Raleigh - we were blocked at "Company Shop" (for 3 days) and side tracked - There Williams Blanks and I met - and we arranged to have our meals at a Negro woman's home near by - I furnished the stores - Immense piles of stores - were here - outdoors - piles of meat - N.C. hams, etc -flour - "sugar" - candies - coffee - etc - it did look so strange that Lee's men had suffered heretofore - so much from hunger - and here was tons of food going to waste - bad management somewhere - where this vast amount had been brought from I do not know - it looked now - as though it would fall into the hands of the raiders - or be given to the torch - we were on our "retreat" - still the enemy were not pressing us - perhaps they could not - outside of "Stoneman" and "Kilpatrick" calvary raids - we had little to fear - and they the enemy - were always "scared" - over cautious and mild charges first and get a ways - first news of danger - pursuit- Finally track was cleared and we reached Greensboro - sleeping in our clothes for a week - seldom water to wash face or hands - dirty cars - dirty quarters - no chance for clean clothing or bath - as the rest of our companies - from General - down to Private - I don't believe there was a man - but what had "lice" - these body lice - about the size and shape of a "grain of rice" - sharp at both ends - with a spot on the back - while at Selma - with Moore and Swann - we went to a pool - clean rockwater daily - soaped from head to heels - put on clean undergarments - shirts, etc - and we never could get rid of the "varmints" every day they were there - a mutual hunt and killing and (cracking) - for me I fought them - but sad to say - brought some home - on my return about May 12 - 1865 - Mary burnt up all my belongings and by others means - and new clothes - was at last "free" - they (infested) the New York and Brooklyn city cars.

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At Greensboro - N.C. - I met Jo Russell - he kindly looked after my comforts and we soon carried me to his quarters - and was made very comfortable - we were so lucky as to get the rooms vacated by some Naval Officers - they leaving cushions, etc - which we used for beds. Capt. Jonathan M Walker - turned up a few days later and begged me to take him in - Russell agreed - and we all lodged at Dr. - rooms - and a colored woman - cooked for us - I furnish the food -

Reported to Head Quarters - Major Moore brought me an order as one of 3 - A.C.S. - to act at Greensboro - but in consequence of my previous record and duty - Gen. Johnson ordered I need not report for duty - till called upon- Hence I was free to do as I wished - Later - I had orders to proceed to Charlotte - N.C. - receive from the Navy Department - a train load of coffee - and bring it to Greensboro - I started one afternoon - at Jamestown - found tracks torn-up and bridges burnt - being only a few miles to High Point - I footed it - arrived after dark - could find no accommodations - so I slept all night - on someone's piazza - next day - I met an officer - who I had entertained at Selma - then home on furlough - as citizen ( ) - who took me to his home - and gave me bed and board - free -

It was impossible to proceed by rail - then - because no locomotive - meeting Adam Empie, Esq - an old Wilmington friend - he was refuging at High Point - insisted on my making my stay with him - with thanks I change quarters - Adam and Mrs. Empie made me very comfortable - I think they had only 2 children at that time -

In 2 days - the Charlotte train arrived - it proved to have the "coffee" aboard - I show my orders to Naval officer in charge - he said come aboard - I must follow my orders and deliver coffee at Greensboro - and so we journey together - I make my report and was ordered to "rest" - I did-

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I had occasion to visit Salisbury N.C. - under orders - and went to hotel - stayed all night - after breakfast - ( ) - I could go on - called at office to pay for lodgings and fare - clerk said "one dollar and twenty-five" - I handed out a five dollar Confederate bill - he shoved it back - saying - only species taken- I told him I was Confederate Officer- traveling under orders - and had no other money - but Confederate - and regretted - stopping at the hotel - what should I do - He said well - "send it to me later" - that was in April 1865 - now - 1905 - money not sent -

While in Greensboro - Jo Russell took his meals at Britlow Hotel - Mr. Britlow proprietor - "closed his doors" - at arrival of every train and put up placard -"Hotel Closed" - Russell and I went in and out - through the back way - "Britlow" said he could not run Hotel on - "Confederate Money" - These were the "ragged end" days of the Confederacy - and just before final collapse - News of "Lee's surrender" came in by escaped prisoners - but was not believed - however the sad truth was soon made manifest.

"Armistice" between Gen. Johnson and Sherman - which Secretary of War Ed. M. Scranton - soon disaffirmed and ordered "Sherman to move against Johnson and capture his army" - Before the Expiration of the Armistice - our men "began to leave - without leave" - and desert in squads - as they had no idea - of capture and prison life at - Yankee Prisons - "Point LeRout?" - "Johnson Island" - "Elmira" and other Death Hotels - far better to die - fighting - in hot blood - than endure the horrors - of "scant food" - "death line" - "freezing to death" - as thousands of our men - had so suffered and died - Gen. Grant - came to our relief and by surrender - ordered and gave same terms - as he had given to Gen. R. E. Lee - But it was too late - thousands of our men had gone - taken the roads - a foot - armed - bound for their homes - land ( )-

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and away - hence our surrendered forces - were small.

My clerks - "Moore and Swann" - ask permission ro leave - I could not grant it - but they took "leg bail" and departed - Major Joseph Sloan - my chief - advised me to remain and said "he hoped all officers - would remain and get - Parole" - Maj. Sloan obtained mine - dated - Greensboro NC - May 1 - 1986 - (Since lost or some place among my papers)-

Now comes an anxiety - to get home - Capt. Jno. M. Walker - had a white horse - and a Negro servant and buggy - War over - it was necessary for the boy - to stay with the horse - night and day - to keep the soldiers from taking him off - Things broke loose and there was some - looting of Government stores - food and clothing - a few rounds of bullets and 2 or 3 killed - put a quietus on that work - our own men. The worst whipped man - of the entire army - that I saw - was Gen. Beauregard - as he was sitting on a crosstie - with hands at his face - and an expression of despair - Exchanged kind words with officers of an Ohio command. Everyone seemed happy at the words "Peace and war over" - one officer said to me - "we are just as tired of this thing as possible and glad it is over"-

Having our Paroles - we had to wait several days before - a chance came to leave - Walker was bound for "Chapel Hill" - his home and must take his horse - without money - what was to be done - for a livery - permission was obtained to allow horse - buggy and boy - loaded on flat car - and to be put off at Hillsboro Station - and arranged to start at noon - while seated on the same flat car - with horse -etc - an officer gave orders -"clear these cars - wanted for troops" - here came a disappointment - and another delay - no knowing how long - I proposed to Walker to see the officer in command - but he said "no" - so I said I would see him - I soon found Col. _________ - Yankee officer in command - stated our case - told him we were Paroled Confederate Officers - wanting to go home, etc - He kindly called an aid and gave orders for our cars - with horse - buggy and boy and ourselves - to be carried on in next train - which he said would leave at 3 PM - so we were fixed - and at 3 PM - pulled out of Greensboro - bound for Hillsboro -NC. That Yankee Engineer - speeded that train at some run - a mile a minute - and I expected

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every moment to be "ditched" - "wounded" or "killed" - Walker's horse - danced and pranced and kept in motion all the time - he could not jump over the siding of car - being securely haltered and tied - it was a " ride" - and I was happy when the 41 miles were covered and we were safely aground at Hillsboro - now we made fire and camped on the open ground for the night-

Next morning - hitched up and drove to Dr. Norwood's Plantation a mile away - Dr. Norwood and family welcomed us and we had a fine breakfast and started on our way to "Chapel Hill" - over county road before 8 AM - as I help - I gave Walker - meal - flour - meat - etc at Greensboro - all we could pile in the buggy - besides Walker had his "saddle" - "Negro boy" behind - thus we made slow going along - The country was full of Yankee soldiers - it was under ( ) -hostilities had ceased - but troops were being placed - as "safe guards" - at different points - We met one Yankee Cavalryman - mounted and armed - who coming up with us said "Hollow - I'd like to have that saddle ?junior got there" - Walker was silent - I said - "that's ours and we can't part with it" - he rode on - we were ( ) - as we drove on and neared Chapel Hill - we met 2 countrymen - just from Chapel Hill - inquiring the news - they reported - "Chapel Hill filled with soldiers - "playing the devil" - "tearing up everything" - "killing stock" - "chaos" and "things wild" - "don't go there" - they said - trouble there -Capt. Walker was scared - the Negro was pale - Walker says - "We will veer off and go to Dr. Wm. Mallett plantation - so as to hide the horse, etc" - "Must save the horse to make a crop" - arrived at plantation - old darky (who Walker knew ) -said "Mrs John - them people been here - and search over everything in the place" - "No place here to hide the horse" - "Dem soldiers - search every where"- "you can't hide nothing but what they will find" - Walker was despondent - what shall we do - I said - Capt. Walker I believe those countrymen were lying - I don't believe a word they say made to any

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depositions by the soldiers - let us drive right in and into Chapel Hill - we have our Paroles - which they are bound to respect - So we drove back and soon in main road - as we were on the surrounding hills - overlooking Chapel Hill - we could see - camps of soldiers - descending the hills we came to - Dr. Wm. ( ) mill - were was stationed a Yankee sentinel - a safe guard - He informed me the General Head Quarters - was just beyond and near the road - so we drove on - Walker's fright - came again - and said "Please so and see - if there is any trouble ahead".

So I got out of the buggy and made my way to the General's tent - ushered in - made salute and found a crowd of officers - explained who we were - (Walker and I) - and said we had been told - there was some rioting in Chapel Hill - and ask if there was any danger in our going on and as our friends were in C. Hill and ( ) house - He smiled and said "Captain - go ahead as there is no trouble at all" - Thanking him - Walker and I kept on our journey - as we passed along the road - we exchanged salutes - with the ( ) - and soon reached Walker's house - Everything was as quiet and calm and peaceful - as a Sunday morning - and just as I had thought - "the Lying Countrymen"-

I have found - the best method to solve some reported findings of danger or apprehension - was to push ahead - face it - meet it - and find out the truth - this means would solve - many of our "ghost stories" - and prove the falsity of many reported things - so many people are given to exaggerate reports and magnify small things - an excusable knowledge of lying - so they think

At Cousin John's house - (Chapel Hill- NC) was his wife Cousin Jimmie Gibbs and Mrs. Mag (Webber) - (John's sister) and some children - met Dr. A.J.DeRosett and wife - Major Graham Davis and wife Alice - Wm. A. Wright and family - Walker Meares and family - At Dr. Wm. ( ) - Mrs. Marietta Walters - Cousin Anna Mallett - (Peter's wife) - also living there - keeping house - Cousin Annie had just had an infant son - (which boy I don't now place) - this was in May 1865.

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I had an experience at Chapel Hill - first news from Wilmington - had heard many wild rumors - letters from Mary - had received my letters - letter from Uncle P.W.F. - with draft for $50.00 in Gold This draft proved an "Elephant" - as no one could give value for same - I consulted Dr.DeRossett - he told me -"he did not believe there was $50.00 in gold in Chapel Hill" - "Useless effort to try for the exchange"- was sick with a sort of diarrhea - no appetite - and little right kind of food - that I liked - while John was a kind as possible - here came the "tea episode" - at Cousin John's table - but those who knew of Cousins Jimmie parsimony - can well imagine - the incident - and of the small - thimble tea - pot and one small cup only - for only one (John) - and no one else - John passed it over to me - the tea-pot had given out - failed - there was no more - why said John - "Jimmie, Capt. S.- needs a cup of tea" - Anxious to move towards home - Walker Meares called and said he was going to make a start for Wil. in the morning and invited me to a seat in his wagon - early next morning - Dr. DeRossett and wife drove up to Walker (they were en route to Hillsboro) - Doct said - "Nick I have come to hand you $10.00 - to help you along" - I thanked him and asked as to its return - He said "Pay my sister - Mrs. Kennedy after you reach Wilmington"- Walker Meares and I started - from Dr. Wm. Mallets house - Mrs. Walker came out and in saying good-bye - "Aint you afraid to go - I hear of so many shooting and killings in the country" - That was poor comfort - my mind was made up - we reached the rail road and train came a crowded in - among Yankee soldiers and Negroes and Negro wenches - a horrid crowd - The dawn of the "dream of equality" was beginning to show itself - among the Negro - as taught by the soldiers - in word and act - we could do no better - so must bear the disgust - Reached Raleigh - near mid-night. I had "carte blanc" from M. Whitaker (Thad W. father- husband of Sue Morris) who lived at R. - to make his house my home and stop with him - whenever in Raleigh - Walker Meares - insisted on my going with him to Col. T.C. McIlhennys- so I consented and we walked a long distance - through

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sleeping and silent Raleigh - (May 1865) - now and then passing a Yankee sentinel- We did not see Mrs. McI - Col. Tom was away - servant made a bed for us - on parlor floor - soon abed - asleep - well tired out - traveling and working and walking since 6 AM - (18 hours) - we intended to rise early and come away - but Mrs. McI - blocked our game - by having hot breakfast at 6 AM - Leaving our thanks - we must move on - I afterwards learned from Col. Tom that his wife was confined - a son born - and hence our not seeing her - I knew Mrs. McI as a girl Margaret Dudley - youngest daughter of Gov. Ed. B. Dudley - raised - schooled and married in Wilmington NC-

We (Meares and I) pushed on - met Dave Pigott - Dave said he would join us - that he had $100 dollars in gold - and would put it in the pot - I had the $10.00 gold Dr. DeRossett had loaned me - Meares said he had not one cent - in negotiable money - Now three in party - went to State Capitol - Head Quarters - showed papers - obtained transportation to Goldsboro NC - taking our chance to catch a train. Later met "Harvey" - of New Bern NC - in charge of train to be returned to New Bern - Invited and insisted on our taking passage with him - Almost too happy for such a chance - accepted and in short time - en route - arrived at Goldsboro - NC - late afternoon - town garrisoned by Negro troops - found a boarding place - "W. Barfield" and later the landlady - was a Wil. girl - Miss Ballard - daughter of Jethro Ballard- who had lived opposite our Wil. house - knew her and her people - for years before -

Provost Officer in charge - informed me train would go to Wilmington - next day - about 9 AM - I sent telegram to Uncle PWF (cost one dollar) - left Goldsboro - next day - arrived in Wil. - about May 12th - Mary and children - M. - L. and Ada - Mr. Louis N. Barlow - wife and family - had moved in as help and protection - and they had house full of Yankee officers and clerks as boarders - there was no escape from this - Mary had entertained - the first of the officers - Generals staff - so soon as Wilmington

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had been occupied - (Feb 23 -1865) - This had been advised by Uncle Fanning - Cousin Richard Bradley and others - as means of protection - I had provided ample stores - meat - flour - sugar - salt - lard - coffee -tea - candles - to last for many months - besides several thousand oak barrel staves - which Uncle Nixon - gave to be used as firewood - "Becky" - our cook - slave of Aunt Susan left at once so soon as enemy arrived - though she promised me - she would stay with Miss Mary - and I was to pay her for services - the nurse girl remained and stayed - Barlow brought his old cook - Aunt Mary (slave) -who was faithful - sickness was among the boarders and Mary was broken down - in nursing and attention - One young man - was very thankful and wrote to Mary - after he went home - North - she had nursed him and he had recovered - One fellow - a Canadian - a surgeon - U.S. Officer - skipped his board - owing $60.00 dollars - every one was polite to me and then - (May 1865) moved harmonious -

I had to - go into a bath and scrub - bought new underclothes - and new blue suit -( ) -Yankee ( ) - complete new outfit - burned up all my old clothes - that I brought home in my trunk. This became necessary - to get rid and kill out - those body "villains" - the natural inheritance of war and camp life in the field.

I was in funds - as Mayor Jno. Dawson - had letter from William Bromley and Uncle Wm. Fanning - with 150.00 dollars in green backs - urging our immediate coming North - this was the first "news" or letter from "kin in the North" - since - May1861- Ports opened and best way was passage by sea - Harris and Howell were agents for steamer (" ? ") - stateroom - 3 berths - 90 dollars - not restricted as to numbers - I engaged usage - Mrs. A.W. Hewlett - widow - who was Jane Withersberry of Cazanosia NY - a friend of my mothers - hearing we were going to New York - called to see "Mary" -

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in a private interview with me - she told me - "she desired to go home" - (Cazanosia - New York) - and if she could get to NY city - she had friends there - she confessed to having so little money - as unable to pay passage to New York - and she had come to know - if she could be of any services to Mrs. S. - help her with the children - and ask could I arrange to have her share our stateroom - Mrs. Hewlett said she was a good sailor and never sea-sick - old and long friends help and her case touched me - and I promised my aid - Next day - I saw H and Howell - they said they were willing - I could take as many in my stateroom - as I wished - the price of passage - was so much for a stateroom - one or more - my stateroom 3 berths - priced at $90.00-

I sought Mrs. Hewlett - and invited her to share our stateroom - she accepted - with many thanks - but said - "Mr. Schenck - I forgot to tell about my boy" -(son 9 yrs old) - here was a dilemma - Well I said you are anxious to go - come along and I will make some provisions for the boy. All aboard - Friday morning - cast lines - steamed down Cape Fear - and out to sea - by New Inlet - or (just below Fort Fisher) - we bumped bottom once or twice - as passing over "Bar" - soon at sea - very calm - I recall - Empie Gibbs - wife and child - Dr. B.F. Fessendon - wife and baby - Miss Lizzie now and Harry Brock - Jos. Neff -Levi A. Hart and family - in all about 130 - white (parents) and children - Smooth seas - till passing Hatteras - The "Hewlett Boy" - I saw Captain and he provided bunk and he was made comfortable - Mrs. Hewlett took to berth - soon as vessel was at sea - and never left it during the voyage - which was so unusually smooth - that Head Steward - told me - "Everybody at table - and meals and they have almost cleaned out the Larder" - "Never knew so few passengers sick" - Quarantine station examination - reached steamer dock - North Moore Street - North River - New York City - Monday morning - last day of May - 1865 - found carriage - proceeded to 105 2nd Place (Bromleys) - arrived before breakfast - Mrs. Hewlett's friend met her and son - First man I saw on dock was - Major Jas. H. Hill.

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Housed at Bromleys - refitted in clothes etc - Aug 1 - 1865 - Minnie's birthday - Uncle Bromley - had all to go to "Bay Ridge" - spend the day - fine weather and good time - Later Uncle William and Aunt Kezia came down to see us - and our crowd visited - Pokeepsie - spending some days - with all the kin - remained at different points. When Oct came -through Mr. Bromley - had arranged to return South and go into "Insurance" - being promised agencies of several New York Companies - when located - stopping in at Thomas and Holmes office - 193 Front Street - New York - to say good by - to Jas. M. Holmes - former clerk with Jonas Smith and Company - (Packets Smith) - when I was with Cazaux - and known since 1855 - He told me his partner Capt. Wm. A. Thomas - would like to see me and asked me to remain till Thomas came in - Capt. T. - soon came - introduced and after short chat - he in private office - ask me as to my plans, etc - and after mutual talk - Thomas advised me not to go south - explained conditions - as he had lately returned from New Bern NC - said if I desired to remain North - which he advised - offered me position of book keeper - salary $1500.00 per year -----

Canvassed matter at house - with Mary - Uncle Bromley - Stan and Adaline - decided to accept - so advised and commenced work with T & H at once - Arranged for Board - with Mrs. Wilcox - Harrison Street - remained till May - when we moved to No. 237 Henry Street - next north to Dr. Henry Richlier - occupied lower part of house - with 2 bedrooms in 4 story - Nellie Bly - cook and maid -On May 19- 1866 - about 9 AM - Josephine Empie - born - (Henry St- Brooklyn) - Mother came to live with us - we had pleasant house friends - in Col. Shauman (widower)- son Daniel - (boy of 9) and Miss Fannie and Emma - they sisters of Col. S. - Miss Emma - a school teacher in P. School - introduced herself and took charge of Minnie and Lyda - who soon commenced - their first going to Public School - in Brooklyn NY - Our rent was $35.00 for month - here we remained - Ada had a very serious sickness in this house.

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Entertained friends here - "Cousin Robert Wood" - "Jas. Lippett" - Caroline Turner - etc. Margaret S - born Aug 20 - 1869 - Maggie Corbin - spent winter with us - moved to No. _____ Court Street - 1871 - flat - William C - born Aug 9 - 1871- Mary had taken serious cold later - held on and failed to get serious relief - Dr. Crane applied his skill - all failed - and he advised me to take Mary south - we had spent summer in Catskills - (Mrs. Lyons) - coming to Brooklyn - having previous planned to go south - stopped over a few days with Mrs. Fanny (Shauman) McCormick - visited Maggie Starr Bromley - took cars? - arrived Wilmington N.C. - 6 AM - Oct 9th - 1873 - Quartered at Mr. Morris house- (Sister Maggie Corbin was also with us in Court Street flat)

James - last son and 8th child - born Wilmington N.C. - Oct 10 - 1873 - 11 AM - Dr. William G. Thomas - I returned to New York - as I had work - etc - later on - Left Thomas and Holmes employment - 1870 - clerked for "Gil Darling" a few months - and then on solicitation (1871) accepted situation with Washington and Co. - (George Washington - J. Connor and P. Mallett) Agents Virginia Steam Line to (Railroad)- book keeper and confidential man and manager - had clerks - "Chas. E. Mallett"- "Jno. Mallett" - Pat and (Fanquier) -Served with them until they gave up agency and went out business - then with "Wheelwright" and "Wood and Mallett" and last with Buck B. ( ) - agent for "Maffett" - until I accepted employment and came and clerked for AH Van Bokkelen - Wilmington N.C. - 1873 or 1874 -

First year occupied Blom House - Chestnut Street - Doc advised Mary and removal to Hickory-NC arranged with Cousin George Gibbs (living there) move up - Mary continued to grow weaker and weaker - Dr. Richard Baker - gave no hope and what relief was possible -

James died Dec 17 - 1875 - (about 26 mos old) - diphtheria - I was called to Hickory NC - arrived

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Dec 20 - 1875 -(while on this visit of 15 days or more) - everyone in the house - was affected more or less with symptoms - sore throat - all in bed - I was only one to crawl around - Diphtheria was epidemic in Hickory - NC - in some case whole families of children 3 to 5 all died - I found Mary much thinner and failing - kept up by stimulants -

My work demanded my return and with Cousin( ) - I helped set up and decorate the "First Christmas Tree" for Py( ) School - even seen in Hickory - I have met ladies since - (1902) - who told me - they recollected me and that Christmas Tree - children then-

The greatest calamity that could happen to any man - came to me - on the evening of Feb 26 - 1876 - by telegram -"telling of Mary's peaceful death - that morning"-while an end must come - the inevitable for the very nature of the fatal and dread disease - but when - with it came that shock of sadness and lament - Mary Morris - was one of the best of the Earth - I can say no less - loved - Buried in plot - Oakland Cemetery - Feb 29 -1876 - for St. James Church - Rev. A.A. Walker - officiating.

Now must we look and care for the living - five girls and one boy - decided to let these children remain in Hickory NC - under care of friends - until winter panned and better arrangements could be made - So they boarded in Hickory - returned to Wilmington - later in fall - Housekeeping - S.W. Corner 2nd and now Grace Street - then on Chestnut Street - and last on 4th Street. Minnie visited sister Aletta - Pokeepsie - 1882 - Uncle Tom Fanning - spent winter 1881 with us and opened Dancing school - Uncle Phineas Wines Fanning - died - Aug 20 -1880 - buried Masonic plot - Oakdale Cemetery.

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(1882) Van Bokkelen - failed - out of business - I went to Riverdale - NC (10miles below New Bern) to assist Chas. Mallett as Robert S. had met with accident - Col Peter M - requesting me to go at once and sent $10.00 to pay passage - on arrival at R. - found Charlie - George and Dr. Fridge Mallett - took charge store, etc - took children there and remained about 14 mos-

Walker Morris offered situation at Cronley NC - pay $75.00 per month - so I went then in 1884 moved the children - kept house, etc.

Mother died Brooklyn - dec 21 - 1884 - we had a Big Fire at Cronley N.C. - destruction Fertilizer Mill - (Latimer) night Dec 24 - 1884 - that morning telegram came from E.P.B. telling of mother's sudden death - Work gave out at Cronley NC - I was laid off in May 1885 "work naptha can't pay" - Hard scratching for a living now - no income-

At Cronley NC - was Geo. and Lee Wright - Walker Morris - Steve and Henry Jewitt - Jno. and Harry Walters- Henry Savage Jr. - Lyda taught school - Willie worked in Fiber mill - with Alex Scott - pay small - Minnie went off - nearby - to teach Cronley Public School - I had work now and then - seldom - made good garden - and so we managed and lived -

(1885) In October - letter came to me from sister Aletta - that Uncle James Schenck had died - and she wanted me to come North - to her - at once to advise about his Estate- strange as it may appear - not one word had I from Mr. Bromley or sister Adaline - at whose home - Uncle James had lived and died - I could go just as well as I was not employed so after correspondence - I went to Wilmington - lodged a week with Cousin Robert Wood and Mary Ann-

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I desire to state - that Cousins Robert and Mary Ann Woods - always most kind to me - always considerate for my comfort - the many years of my living in Wilmington - was frequent visitors to them - and always invited upon all occasions - Christmas - birthdays or any company - loving Cousins to me and mine -

Taking car at Wil. NC - I made straight passage to Pokeepsie - John and Aletta had room and meals at hotel near by - (Willie was in NY) - stayed with them a week and then to Brooklyn - to "investigate" - affairs of "Uncle James Schenck" - now deceased - Uncle James left no will - so his estate - would be divided - as follows -

Bro Abraham - only brother or sister living - - - - - - - - - - - - - - his share - - - - 1/4 3/12

Jane Schenck ( ) children - Julia Pyle - Mary McCarty & ( ) Johnson - their shares 1/4 1/12

Ramseur Schenck children - Nicholas - Steven - Aletta - Magdelane- their shares 1/4 (4/16/4)

William Schenck children - Adaline F. - Aletta J. - Nicholas W. - - - - - -their shares 1/4 1/12 ea

Arrived at Brooklyn and made for "105 2nd Place - Bromley's House" - met Mr. Bromley - after friendly exchange - he seemed glad to see me - and said "you will stay with us" - I said No -have arranged to stay with Cousin Lucretia Schenck Mills - (139 Pacific Street) - Then Mr.B asked why? - I said "Uncle James has been dead some time - possibly 2 mo - and not one line from you or Adaline - as regard Uncle James death or word from you" - "This is so strange to me" - Mr. B - apologized and said - "Ada did not think it necessary - but he regretted not writing"- My object was to find out all possible - and they did not know I had been to Pokeepsie - Mr. B said - he was anxious to show me Uncle James (matters) - declining to stay longer - I left with promise to call next day - see Uncle James matters - called at Maggie Stan - saw Stan and Maggie - cordial and loving as ever - Took cars for Lucretia - spent night - called next day at 1302 Dean Street - to see Cousin Julia - Amelia and Willie - and then made for 105 2nd Place - arrived and soon examining papers - book accounts and memorandums of Uncle James - This matter - I came specifically to find out - and now had full opportunity-

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Mr. Bromley had in charge matters for Uncle James Schenck for past 2 years and 9 months - and most of this time Uncle James had made his home with them (105 2nd Place Brooklyn NY) as Canarsie home and family was invited out and occupied by - Jas. Whitaker- I examined matters fully - and saw the entire estate as to personal - bonds - mortgage - cash - etc - Having satisfied myself fully - and made through examination - after lunch I made move to leave - Mr. B again repeated the invitation to stay with them and said sister Adaline desired to see me before leaving - My interview and examination had been between Mr. B and myself - Ada nor Fanning not in the room - Going to upper hall - from basement - for coat and hat - Ada (my sister) came to the door and said - "I want you to come and stay here with us - all the time you remain in Brooklyn - make it your home and go and come when you please - there is a room for you and Mr. B and I both want you to come" - I was still sore - over - that matter of their neglect in writing - so I said I am much obliged and will consider it - Called at Maggie Stan (1st Place) home - always a most kind friend to me - she said - "if you don't want to stay at Father's (Mr. Bromley) come and stay with us - Stan and I want you - and hope you will remain North till Uncle James - matters are settled - we feel you can help father (Mr. B) and hope you will stay and come and make our house your home"-

The 1st night from Pokeepsie - I called at Josie Gibbs (Montague Street) about 7 PM and stayed till 10:30 PM - no one had extended or invited to spend the night - so I left about 10:30 PM and made my way for "Pierrefont House" - asked for a nightly lodging - paid $1.00 for a room and was soon elevated to 6th story - small room - small bed and little sleep - next morning breakfasted downtown and made late for Cousin Lucretia - Being now in possession of all necessary facts - as to Uncle James Estate - after a week visit in Brooklyn - started for Pokeepsie - explained matters fully to Brother Jno. Cooper and Aletta - she requested me to see Judge Gilbert Dean - with Bro. Jno. - we drove out to his country place - had full interview - he afterwards called on Aletta and advised her - to "follow the advice of your brother Nicholas - as he is fully conversant with all matters and understands the Law fully in such cases" - "he can advise you - as well as I and being in interest with you - he can tell you all matters and what to do" - This advice Aletta followed - after spending some days in Pokeepsie - returned to Brooklyn-

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In consideration of my friendship for Maggie Starr - Standish and Maggie Green - and the many favors and kindness they have shown to me in years past - (1865 and since) - and the repeated invitations of Mr. B and Adaline - I consented and moved my effects from Cousin Lucretia Schenck Mills - to my sisters house - 105 2nd Place - Time rolled on - finally - Uncle Abram Schenck (Uncle Jas. only surviving brother) - with George McCarty - as grand nephew - (grandson of June Schenck and Ralph ? ) - son of Mary Mal? McCarty of Washington City D.C. - assumed the administration of Jas. Schenck Estate - IWR Bromley - had in his possession - every bond - mortgage - notes and papers of the late Jas. Schenck -

Mr. Bromley requested me - to make full statement of his dealings - with Uncle James - for past and nearly now 3 yrs - detail same and calculate interest - and show fully all matters -

After much labor - investigation and thorough examination - statement was made in detail - with full explanation - and with the bonds and mortgages - were delivered to Abram Schenck and George McCarty - Adm. - and receipt for us - everything was surrendered to them - It is well - to note here - Mr. Bromley agreed to pay me for this work -

Just here follows inquiry and ( ) - The accounts show that Bromley had charged Uncle James - $250.00 per month for about 2 years and 8 mos - for his (Bromley's) services - in amount about (8,000.00 dollars) total -

The Heirs and Adms. - raised a "question" - to this matter - as "exorbitant" - from the fact that all Uncle James monies - were invested in good paying stocks and mortgages - and hence little work to collect interest - and besides - as his (Jas. ) annual income - was about and only 9,000.00 dollars - The charge of 33 1/3% - was exorbitant - the labor or work to collect interest on mortgages - RR Stock and Bonds - was so insignificant - that the heirs - made very strong protest - against allowing Bromley's a/c - and wanted to investigate - the matter of $250.00 per month - for Bromley's services - This was a serious matter - Mr. Bromley had no evidence in writing - he could only say "James promise it and signed checks" - (all checks show Jas. Schenck's signature - save 3 checks)-

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Mr. Bromley was seriously alarmed at this talk of "suit" -"exorbitant charges" - etc - so was Adaline - Maggie Stan and Standish B - Fortunately - I (NWS) was the only member of the "Heirs" - who was welcomed at all their homes - I had the "welcome entrance" - to all their houses - and I called on all - explained - talked and concluded differences - so that finally - No action was taken in regard - to "Bromley's Commissions" - though many of the heirs - demanded the change in billing terms - and even the Executor - pronounced against it -

Then arose - another matter - my sister Adaline - thought she ought to be paid for her care and attention to Uncle James - during his failing years - as he lived in later years with her and died in her house - Her Lawyer - made out her lengthy bill - in detail - with full charges - for care - etc -etc - amounting as I recall to some (near $3000.00) - duly presented to Adms.- The Adms. - informed her - "this bill will not be paid" - Prospect of law suit - Mr. Bromley was opposed to the whole thing and did not bill presented - though he said Uncle Jas. - "ought to have given Ada $10,000.00". This bill come to "Ears of Heirs" - "serious protest and fight it to the end" - "never pay it" - except at Law's demand - things were serious - To review - Ada had taken good care of Uncle James - given him all comforts - says the Heirs "Bromley has already gotten near $8000 in past 3 (near) years - is not that enough - to pay for all" - "we will contest this bill" - Matters so ran - I finding out the feeling of all the Heirs advised Adaline to compromise - and take what the Executor would pay - After many talks - consultations and ( ) - in every shape and lawyers consulting - Ada authorized me to settle and compromise for $500.00

Accordingly - in a few days - called the McCarty's office - NY - opened the question of Adaline's claim-etc - McCarty informed me - deadly - that Heirs would contest Mrs. Bromley's claim and would not allow it - after talk and reviewing matters - I said "George can't this matter be compromised" - he replied - "We don't feel like allowing once cent" - finally I led him into a "compromise condition" in Ada's claim - he asked me - "Have you her authority" - being so informed - He said her would enter into a "compromise" - when I offered and proposed $500. In full all demands - this was accepted and Adaline received her check next day (500 dollars) - My pay - has not even been "Thanks" - and to this later day - now over 15 years -

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Reviewing this matter Adaline claims- Uncle James - lived with them (105 2nd Place - Brooklyn) for about 3 years - he was a man who made no trouble in a house - no doubt he required care and attention and part of the time the care - was very disagreeable - he being in senile condition and unable to help himself - one of the infirmaries of age - when comes helplessness-

Against this - put the facts - of his medicine bills - not exceeding $35.00 for all his sickness - His Doctors bill - ten dollars ($10) - and Mr. Bromley commissions ( as his receiving nearly or quite $8000.00) from Uncle James - during the 3 years he lived there - The "Heirs" thoroughly ablative - her family had been fully paid - in these things ----- and so I thought-x

Referring to earlier day - "Adeline - Mr. Bromley - Stan and Maggie (Biddy servant)" - went to Canarsie LI every summer - for many summers and enjoyed Uncle Jas. hospitality - never paying a dollar for board - The summer "Schenck" was sick and the summers of Fannie P and Ed P - infancy and childhood - they always were at Canarsie - in the summer - so long as Uncle James lived there and this commenced in 1856 - Uncle James left Canarsie - (about 1890) - still many summers they went to ( ) New Jersey -

My conclusion is Adaline was well paid in the $500. and in the many years before - when she lived at Canarsie (with Grandma S) before her marriage and afterwards - where they spent summer after summer - when her children were young - they went from Brooklyn and spent usually June- July and August - at Canarsie. Mr. Bromley was a man of many noble traits and good points - the mystery to me is how he could charge and accept $250.00 per month from Uncle James - when the work was so slight and when he knew Uncle Jas. income - from all sources - was about 9000.00 per year - x - The fact is true and thus we see Mr. B - charged and received about 1/3 of Uncle James yearly income - (Bromleys a/c - as made out by me - will show this) - then Adaline coming with her claim - it was well - I was in Brooklyn - to calm the angry talk, etc - Yet for this - Adaline - Fannie and Ewd. - seem to think - I have rendered no important service to them or Mr. B. and have little or no love or regard for me - I ask myself - why is this? - only answer is - "selfishness"-

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Uncle Abram Schenck and George McCarty administered on Uncle James estate- Mr. Bromley and I - turned over - all the bonds - mortgages - RR stock - property and books - with full and explicit and detailed statements of his - affairs - as in hands of Mr. Bromley for past (near 3 years) - and received detailed receipt- At request of Mr. B. - I made the full statement of account - showing entire "Personal Estate for Jas. Schenck" interests -debits and credits - this was a particular and careful work - I was many days in preparing same - Mr. Bromley fully intended to pay me - for this work - and other assistance - and so told me - but never did- Now the administering has been fixed - the only course for the heirs - was to wait - and have patience - as New York Law - provides - one year for publication and calling in bills - the testator may owe and outstanding - Then "6 mos more" or 18 months in all before Adms. was required to pay "heirs"-

My visit to Brooklyn and Pokeepsie - being accomplished - my natural course - was to return home - then (Conley NC) - Cousin Wilkes Morris coming to NY - in interest of "Latimer work" - he invited me - to spend a week or more with him at his hotel - I gladly accepted and we traveled city daily - "Scott" - was on hand - at times - Talking of going back - Mr. B - Ada - said stay and Ewd. was anxious for me to secure work in NY or Brooklyn - Said "Stay Uncle Nick - as long as you please" - "we are glad to have you" -

Finally one day in Broadway - with Wilkes - Frank McAllister accounted me and requested I would call and see him - some important matter - Later calling on McA - at 22 Day Street - I was employed by him - and this event - determined - my "stay North" - later sending for the children "Minnie-Lyda- (Ada - Hickory NC) - Josie - Daisy and Willie" - they coming on by "Clyde Line" - June 1886 - and our house keeping - in furnished house - flat - in Orange Street - Brooklyn - rent $50.00 month - Later rented furnished house in Pacific Street - Brooklyn - a few doors from Cousin Lucretia Schenck Mills and there we moved and lived - mean time - ( ) - Mary Cassidy a bride - ( )Lippitt - Cousin Jane Bradley and husband - Richard Bradley - and grandson Richard B. - were at times - entertained by us-

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After a year and over - at Pacific - moved to 2nd Place - to be near Uncle B and sister Adaline - later arranged to buy 106 St. Mark Ave. and moved - purchased new furniture and house outfit -

(As I had sold out my Cronley effects to Wm. Latimer) - here we resided - However before this - while living in 2nd Place - my daughter - Eliza Fanning was married to Jno. J. Disosuray at St. Paul's church (corner Clinton and ________) Brooklyn - December 11 - 1889 - by Rev. J. Dolby Skeen - they left for their home - New Bern NC - My daughter Josephine Empie married Edw. Baker - Nov 10 - 1891 - at 106 St. Marks - Brooklyn - Rev. J.D. Skeene - home wedding and supper - they left for south - Augusta - Georgia - My daughter Mary Cooper - married Owen McRae Holmes - home wedding - 106 St. Marks - Brooklyn - 23 Nov - 1892 - Rev. JD. Skeen - reception - supper -etc - they left for NewBerry SC-

My 2nd marriage to (43 yr old) Anne Elizabeth Holmes (daughter Ann Hill and Owen Davis Holmes) - occurred Oct 4 - 1892 - Wil. NC - 11:30 AM - Rev. Joseph Carmichael -DD - residence of her oldest brother "Gabriel Holmes" - after elegant breakfast we left by cars for my home - Brooklyn - New York - quiet wedding - chiefly family - no cards - Lived at 106 St. Marks Avenue - till late October - 1896 - when came south - visited Richmond Virginia to see Lyt and Alice Mann and then on to Spartanburg - SC - son Graham to sister Eliza - (Wm. Haughton) - born Nov 13 1896 - Visited Wilmington NC - stayed at " Hills" (old McRae house - 2nd Street) - went to Masonboro Sound in July 1897 and remained through to Nov 3 1899 - Grainger Place-

Never in my life - derived more pleasure out of the sound than this summer 1897 - we had at times - Arthur's family and ( ) - Julia Harrison family - Uncle Buck - Aunt K - Charles Hill - Gabe and Lee - Jo Walters and wife and children - Wm. Walters and theirs - I have noticed as many as 18 at breakfast table - we had "Hagar" - a splendid cook and Pauline - for house girl - fish were abundant as we could buy a bunch 7 to 8 pig fish for 10 cents or 3 bushels for 25 cents - our gardens full with NC vegetables from Sheriff Hewlett's - (near Masonboro Sound)

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The "Granger Place" - on Masonboro Sound was isolated - nearest neighbor - 600 yards or more - so it was "go as you please" - my daughter Daisy was there some times - afterwards went to Cousin Lee Wright - Wrightsville Sound - (4 miles away) - having a good bateau boat - with the children - our daily sport was collecting oysters or crabbing - by line or net - along shore - result from memoranda kept - for the season - we collected "75 Bar Oysters" and caught over 2000 hard crabs - These were all eaten and through jolly and fair oyster roasts and crab salad - fried crabs - crab omelettes - fully taste feast - In fall of year - we had sea bird also - then the fine bathing - take it all in all - there is as much "good in Life" to be found at the "sounds"- in "Old North Carolina" - as any spot on God's Green Earth - Amen!- I could live like a "Prince" and die as a "Christian" - at the good old sound-

About 5th Nov - 1897 left sound - rainy day - spent a day or so at Aunt Julia's and Kate Hill - Wil. NC - telegraph from Eliza Haughton - we left for Spartanburg SC and remained there till Sept 1898 - on invitation from Emilie Vaughan - we visited Asheville NC - (her home Forest Hill) - between Asheville and Biltmore NC - Lady Emilie insisted on our staying - she went North - with Miss Bennett in Nov and did not return till Christmas - Annie and I run Forest Hill for 6 weeks - and left there Dec 18 - 1898 - for Spartanburg- we had a most delightful visit - Emilie V. - had house full - at one time over 40 boarders - finally it grew less and less - until only 6 - we left house in charge of her girl "Eliza" - we paid all bills and left our statement - remained with Eliza dn WSH - till following July - went to Wilmington NC and stayed with Aunt Kate Hill (McKee House) - Aunt Julia now dead -

In August - Annie had operation for what Dr. B - had decided as "cancer in left breast" - In Oct. - moved and lived with Julia Harrison on Princess Street - near 5th - On July 23rd 1900 - moved to Wrightsville Sound (WAW Jr. Place) - old London house for quarters - remained till Oct 23/ 1900- spent most delightful 3 months - and received every attention from William Augustus and Cousin Lee - went to town on Nov 9th - Annie left for Charlottesville -Va. via Richmond -(Lyt M? met Annie in Richmond) - As I had work in Wil. NC first with Cousin Jno. Hill Brown and later with Morton and Co (Jesse Welder) - I did not go with Annie - while my pay was very small $6.25 for week - it paid our living expenses and was better than being idle - A part of the time at Spartanburg SC - we kept joint housekeeping with Eliza and WSH - at Wilmington with Aunt Kate - my share of expenses - was to pay for the living (provisions) - Annie made same arrangement with sister Julia H and I paid living (food and wood) expenses-

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Sept. 1898 I and Annie in Asheville N.C.- Annie began in Nov - to complain of a pain in her breast- and so on from time to time. At Eliza - later on - Eliza desired to call in Dr. Nott - and was anxious to do so- however Annie was very decidedly opposed - and so nothing was done- July - after we reached Wilmington NC - I fully decided to call in Dr. Tho. S. Burbank - after much persuasion Annie consented and examination was made - The next day - I called on Dr. B. at his office - as he had - just then - phone message "to go to sound" - Dr. B - invited me to go with him - so I accepted - on our way down - the matter of Annie's troubles was further gone into - Dr. B.'s - conclusion - that this lump in Annie's breast - was a "cancer" - commonly known as "Rose Cancer" - firm fact - that in time - if allowed to remain - the lump would grow and grow - finally come through the skin - and later on present the appearance of a full bloom red rose - with this comes intense pain and always extreme offensiveness - hence he advised -"an operation at once" - this was serious and alarming.

It became my painful duty - to break this news to Annie and to urge an operation as soon as possible - you may depend on it - she opposed everything - and never would submit to the knife - finally she surrender and in a few days preparations being made- 7 Dr. arrived - about 11 AM - those few hours - (11 to 2) are too full of sadness for me to relate - the "fears of Annie" and the trying ordeal - she stood the operation well and was comfortable in bed by 2:30 - Annie Walters (Jos. Walters) beloved wife - was present in the room all the time - and her kindness and good part then and afterwards - will always be remembered by me - with professed gratitude and loving remembrance- Dr. B. - made excuse to send me away and kept me out - so soon as Annie had passed under the effects of the anesthetic - Annie's health - being most excellent - her recovery came rapidly and save from the cancer she appeared as well as ever - there was no later offensiveness - I dressed her hounds and the place - twice daily- entire healing did not come - two small pimples came - and Dr. B. - later removed - then appeared evidence of small risings under the skin - then came intense pain - in left arm - but this pain only came - about 4 AM and so for 2 to 2 hours - it was continue - generally by 7 AM - the pain had gone - and no more that day - till following day - and coming near same hour in the very early morning - (4 AM) - There could be found no relief for this - Dr. prescribed -"morphine" - so as to

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produce sleep - and to act so as to meet the hour - thus hoping to bring relief - sometimes it helped and some times not - I left Wil. NC - Saturday 7 PM - Dec 22 - 1900 - for Charlottesville - Va. - pressed ( )in Richmond next morning - left Richmond 3 PM Sunday - arrived at C. - about 8 PM - Lyt met me at station - in rain storm - Dec 23 - 1900 -

I realized Annie had failed and was failing - while the "place" - on breast was no more - there had come many "blotches"on her skin - too sure evidence that the disease had entered her blood - then she was annoyed by "shortness" of breath - even slow walking was tiresome. Her appetite was good - and she was cheerful - was with others - we played - "set back" - "whist" - "hearts" and every night of the week - seldom retiring before 10 PM- Annie's condition soon determined me - "to remain and nurse and care for her"- so I wrote Jesse Wilder and resigned my place - Dec 24 - 1900 - Monday - on invitation we (Lyt - Alice -Annie and I) took train for Geo. Macon - to spend Christmas - arrived at Keswick Depot by rail near noon - carriage took us in to George Macon's home - 2 miles from Keswick - (C&O RR) Depot - Christmas day we had old time "eggnog" - stayed 3 days and returned to C - Annie was up to ride often - but I could see was failing - Day by Day passed - Sunday Feb 17 - 1901 - Alice took Annie to ride - Lyt and I went to Grace Church - Rev. Lee - home near 1 PM - Alice and Annie soon return - Monday came - Annie not resting so well Sunday night - I persuaded her to remain - abed - so she did breakfast at bedside - about or near 10:30 Annie had bad turn - kind of faint - she did not seem to realize what had passed when - I tried to explain and letting her - she had had serious attack and I fear she could not survive another - however she recovered and seemed as usual - Rev. Wm. Lee called after 12 and we had "Communion" - present "Annie - Alice - Lyt and I" - a very solemn occasion - prayers, etc - Annie went to bed - but did not complain and seemed as usual - Dr. Macon - had been in several times - he was apprehensive and said anything may happen - while Annie rested (2 to 4 PM) I wrote letter to Owen and - Eliza - I feared conclusions - Annie had awoke and was talking - Alice in and out - Just after 5 PM - I went to bed and Annie was sitting up - made no complaint and talked as usual - later on she expressed desire - to get up - I advised her staying - abed - later she said - "I must get up" - and with this made an effort - turning herself around and placing her feet on the floor - she started to rise up - I placed my arms under her to help - and she made the effort to arise - when I felt her wight - as she seemed to give way-

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and at same time - she said - "I faint" - just after she sank as it were - her entire weight - on my arm - I laid her gently back down on the bed - just then and during this Alice came in room - I said Alice - "Annie is gone" - I knew and feared the end - Jennie the servant called for Dr. M - by phone - we applied or tried to apply stimulants - just then "Mrs. Johnson" - called in Dr. Hugh Nelson - who was passing - all was over - He ( Dr. N) pronounced Annie dead - she passed away about 5:35 PM - Monday Feb 18 - 1901 - at Lyt and Alice Macon's home - Charlottesville Va. - Dr. Macon soon came - Mrs. Wallace - Page and others - came and assisted - The sad end came so sudden - we could not realize "Annie" had passed away - there were no signs of "wasting" - in death she looked as in the bloom of health - and as sweetly at rest - the repose of death - Journey to Wilmington and burial (after services at St John Church - Rev Dr. Jas. Carmichael) in Oakdale Cemetery - Holmes family Lot - friends from a distance - "Sister Eliza" - "Lyt Macon and sister Alice"- and "Minnie Schenck Holmes" - Wilmington kin all there and many family friends - (Burial Ash Wednesday - Feb 20 -1901) - Returned with sister "Alice" to Charlottesville - Feb 27th - 1901 x-

What results may have come - if Annie had heeded the advise of sister Eliza and called in Doctor Nott - in the early part of 1899 - when in Spartanburg - so little apprehension then - of this serious matter!!! Remained in Charlottesville Va. - till April 29th - 1901 - arrived Spartanburg SC - sister Eliza - stayed till May 7th - left for Skyland NC - served with Emilie Vaugh - Forest Hill - Asheville NC til Sept 28th - 1901 - left for Spartanburg (sister Eliza's) - Nov 1st - to Newberry SC at Owens - Jan 7 - 1902 - to Spartanburg SC- went to New York - Jan 20th -(Lawsuit - DJ Schenck vs Oscar Engles - notes etc) - New York - Brooklyn - Jan 21 to Feb 12/1902 - then to sister Alice - Charlottesville Va- Remained in Charlottesville Va - Feb 12 to May 22/1902 - then to Biltmore -(where Ada and Daisy rented house and took boarders) from - May 20/1902 to Oct 9 - 1902 - thence to Hickory (invite Mrs. R?) - Dec 20/1902- Express Co- call and left for Spartanburg SC (WSH And Eliza) - to Newberry SC - Jan 16 to 31st - returned to Eliza's (Spartanburg SC) Feb 20/1903 to Atlanta Ga - to visit Lyda and JJD - remained

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- June 11 - 1903 (with Lyda and children Margaret and boy Jack) to Pawleys Beach - below Georgetown SC and remained until Aug 7th /1903 - staying with Mrs. St. John Lachicotte - then we me Maud Morris ( a cousin) who married Capt. ( ) and also Lassie Morris (married to Bugg) - good sea bathing and fun times -

Remained in Atlanta till October 3 - 1903 and went to Spartanburg SC - (old ? friends WSW and sister Eliza) and stayed till Oct 20th - (Alice Macon was there part of the time) Left Oct 25 - 1903 for Hickory NC - stopped over at Asheville NC - spent day and night at Emilie Vaugh - called to see Miss Mamie Cameron - (she was not at home) - arrived Hickory NC Oct 27 - 1903 -(Ada ran the house Mr. Royster - I paid all expenses - broke my arm - by a fall - midnight Dec 31 - 1903) Alice and Lyt Macon - sent frequent invitation and so soon as able left Hickory March 10 -1906 - for Charlottesville Va. - Lyt M. - found business opportunity for me - so on June 1 -1904 - I was appointed - "Treasurer of the Virginia Realty and Insurance Co" - Charlottesville Va - (Miss Bibb - also Macon and Heyden and in interest) pay $50.00 for month - lived with Alice and Lyt- besides in house - at table were - Tom Macon and Guy Robinson - In all my stopping with Lyt Macon - I had helped him - in his office work - books- a/c -etc and both with pay and without pay - day to day - a very social - happy and pleasant household - part of the time Mr. and Mrs. Hulfih? - boarded with Alice - while their house - was building - during this time - Tom Macon and I roomed with Dr. W. ? Macon - as his lovely wife (Mary Johnson) had died July 18th - 1903 and we slept in his home - meals at Lyt and Alice-

Alice Macon - died Aug 31 - 1904 - about or near 5 PM- Eliza Haughton and I were there - Alice, Lyt and I had been to Rawley Springs Va for ten days or two weeks - Alice taken sick immediately from our return home to Charlottesville - A - asked - to write to Eliza her sister and little Graham to come as soon as they could - she lived ? ? - we located Lyt - he came in time - I ? The help of nurse (beginner) laid Alice out - she was buried a Sunday ? At Keswah's Macon's plot -AB Schenck-

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Alice death - broke up Lyt's home - he rented his premises and was soon on the road - as for past 2 years - he has followed -"Drumming" - I went to "? " - Dr. Macon house and boarded - ($20 for mo) - good quarters and happy home - business ruling so dull - with salary deuced to $25 for month - My firm friend WS Haughton - offered me a home with him and Express Co of - needing "Christmas time help" - sent fee for transportation - I left Charlottesville - Dec 21 -1904 - and at midnight - WSH - met me at train - sweet welcome from Eliza - and there I remained - for a season - enjoying their hospitality and invited kindness in many ways-

Eliza - W.G. H. - Willie and self came over to Newberry SC - Saturday Dec 24 - 1904 - by invitation - for Christmas dinner - with Owen - Minnie and family - remained one week - all returned to Spartanburg - There I (NWS) remained till June 5 - 1905 - came over to Newberry SC - stayed with Owen MRH and Minnie till July 6 - 1905 -Daisy was also here - and she left for Atlanta - in June - As Josephine and Ned Baker from Waxahachie - Texas - en route for Norfolk Va. - had arrived at Lydas - at Atlanta Ga- This hastened my leaving - arrived at Atlanta about 4:30 PM - Ada came from Hickory NC - later and stayed 2 weeks - Josephine and Ned left - later in July - Josie going to Richmond to visit Hattie Taylor Borden - then later to Baker at - Norfolk - I remained in Atlanta - with Jack Lyon - till 16 Dec - 1905 -(came along with Jack Lyon - May and Jack J - they en route to New York for holidays) - stayed at Eliza and Willie - spent Christmas - left Spartanburg - Dec 26 - 1905 arrived Newberry SC -same day - 4:30 PM and stayed with Owen and Minnie- (Owen McRae Holmes - died Jan 19 -1910 - Newberry SC)

Daisy accepted service ( ) - TWC House - 33 Cone St - Atlanta - Sept 1 - 1905 - and there now remains -The record is to - Jan 1- 1906 - May add later dates and visits - of personal things - to page (75)

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Charcoal - antidote for all kinds of internal poisons-xxx-

A Japan MD - says it is impossible for internal poisoning to result in death- if charcoal - (vegetable or animal) is given so soon as gastrointestinal troubles are felt - must be taken on first symptom - large doses - take in suspension in water - Dose - tea spoon of charcoal - put in glass of water and stirred while it taken so that it shall not settle in the bottom of the vessels and sides- Use a large spoon - and give at interval of 10 minutes - The power of this remedy and its results - consist in the absorbing power of charcoal said to have special action - upon "Nox Vomica" - (Canthourdes) - strychnine and also poison - of "Verdig?) - "mushroom" -"arsenic" -"laudanum" - also poisoning by "Ice cream" -

Charcoal takes up alkaloid toxins and mineral poisons - it is the most intense of all known antidotes - great ( ) for all gases and all salts - it immediately determines the formulation of air innocuous combination - It envelops the poison - deporting the poison from the stomach - there is no danger even in large doses of charcoal - This remedy is so simple and so easily procured - it should be made known - far and wide - particularly among families of children and careless parents - Personally - I recommend a dose now and then - for persons - who have pain in the stomach or bowels - as result of gas - or indigestion food or drink - as charcoal is hard to mix with water - it should be stirred until well mixed and taken rapidly - to prevent settling ( ) - NWS

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Always give others - the credit of being - as honest as you are - before making accusations! -

Have faith in the general Honesty of Man Kind.

Alcohol - or any spirits - can be used with success - in the sick room - as a refrigerant - cooling off the skin in fever - (may be used warm or cold with flannel applications) - It is better than ice - in rapidly of action - and also it certainty - gives much relief to fever patients.

Is coffee as a drink injurious?- Yes and no - properly made and taken in moderation it is a valuable drink - it may be abused - what are the records of some heavy drinkers -

A French Woman - Eliza Daneaux - at the French Court 1827 - then 114 yrs old - her principal nourishment - had been 40 cups (small) per day -

Another - named "Font? " - drank incessantly - and was over 100 yrs old -

Voltaire - drank it to an excess - Napoleon - drank over 20 cups per day - this is the record - its advocates - say at proper time for drinking - gives physical energy and mental activity - ( ) Prohibited to children - in any form - wait until full ( ) development- not for those with heart trouble - for old people - for hard smokers and drinkers - it may be used - to counterbalance the excitiblity produced by tobacco and alcohol - coffee - abused - in some people may produce and allow - insomnia and ( ) - it's a stimulant - to be avoided by the confirmed dypolelic - like many other things - moderation is the golden mean - Try moderation always - NWS

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Cotton sold in 1905- average price 7 cents - in 1906 - 12 - now strong effort to hold - for 15 cents-

Memo- Jan 26 - 1906 - The 2nd Annual Cotton Convention - met at New Orleans and held session - Jane 11- 12- 13 - Hon. Harvey Jordan - presided - Richard Cheatham - Secretary - E.D. Morgan - Finance Agent - Jno. D. Walker - L.S. - many prominent and influential men - present in all branches of industry and many discussion and subjects to communicate on - The main feature and end - was to influence the farmers and others - to hold on - to the balance of the Cotton Crop - 1905 and 1906- until - 15 cents for # - was secured- The cotton crop - for past 10 years - has averaged - close to 10,000,000 bales - save last crop 1904-1905 - when it exceeded - 13,000,000 bales - The consumption of cotton fabrics has increased and mills continues to increase - as knowledge advances - the people of the world - become better acquainted - travel and civilizing methods - of the great factories extended - commerce opened - Rail roads built in foreign lands- demand will come - The United States - "is the largest producing Cotton country in the world" - in record number - 27,000,000 acres in cotton - with a yield per season - 9,500,000 - to 11,000,000 bales - (this data) - with the same acreage and the improved methods that will surely come - cannot the yield be brought to - 1 bale for acre - on average - not now - but when the manufacturing worlds - "calls for more" - Our farmers - must learn the lesson of diversified crops and rotation - the first lesson and thought - is to raise at home - all the supplies need for family support - help and stock - keep the acreage of your money crop - as near the gauge of "supply and demand" - and this regulates the price - and made the cotton crop a "money making crop" - our farmers buy too much - "fertilizers" - with more industry and right methods - large quantities of manure can be collected and made on the farm - this is important - the matter of the farm - should be - "all necessary feed raised at home" - so far as possible -(NWS)

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When the War - "between the States" - (United and Confederate sides) - closed in 1865 - the prospects of recuperating really seemed impossible - a vast amount of property destroyed - the labor (Negroes) freed - the country swept almost clean of good money - Confederate money and bonds worthless - and the people - poor - added to this - thousands of the young blood - killed in battles - or wounded for life - The situation seemed desperate - with little hope on any side - then the result of the Army's return to "peaceful ways" - re-organization - new conditions - and complex question - gave promise of much trouble - to the South - I thought - if we could recover our former status and wealth in 100 years - we would be doing well - this is now - the year of "Grace" 1905 - scarce 50 years have passed - and see the wonderful changes and situation - as shown forth - today - in the attached memoranda - from the "Manufactural Record" - as described by editor RH Edmunds - extracts from his letter - to the Atlantic Constitution - Nov 9 - 1905 -

(Read and ponder) -

"South Was Unknown"

"(1866) Then the world knew comparatively little about the South, and what it did
know was colored by the wild sensationalism of political enemies and of many un-
friendly newspapers. (1905) Today, not only is this country from the Atlantic to the
Pacific, but throughout Europe, it is recognized that the South is the coming center
of the world's greatest activity.
Here is to be "the coming El Dorado of American adventure". It is entirely within
reason to say that within the next five years and before the Atlanta Exposition shall be
opened (1910) - for it may be accepted that Atlanta, having put its hand to the plow
and projected this exposition, will not now turn back, but that, as in the past, it will
carry forward to preeminent success an undertaking worthy of the country, worthy of
the South, and around which the business interests of the entire country can justly rally-
the advancement of the South will be far greater than all that has been accomplished
in the last 15 years. What we have done in 15 years in material up building, in the
accumulation of wealth, in the development of coal and iron properties, in the utili-
zation of our unlimited water powers, will now be duplicated within five years.
From Wheeling, W. Va, to El Paso, Texas, from the high mountains of Western
Carolina to the Gulf, there is a wide sweep of business activity, of increasing pros-
perity of life and enthusiasm. In all that broad section is heard what has been "the
aptly termed music of progress, the whirr of the spindle, the buzz of the saw, the
throb of the locomotive and the roar of the furnace." The possibilities of the future
are practically without limit. It is true that we are making nearly as much iron and
mining more coal that the United States made of the one and mined of the other
25 years ago, but so vast are the resources of the South in coal and iron that this section
can continue the profitable development of mining of iron and steel making to the
point where we shall produce far more than the entire country now produces."

"Mill Capital Increased"

"It is true we have increased the capital invested in cotton mills from $21,000,000
to $225,000,000, and that we have now 9,000,000 spindles, against 600,000 spindles
25 years ago, but we are still furnishing three-fourths of the raw material for the
110,000,000 spindles which are operating in the world. Our cotton crop, averaging
$6000,000,000 in value when sold by the Southern farmers, is worthy largely over
$2,000,000,000 in the finished product before it reaches the consumer. If we would
measure something of the limitless possibilities of the future, it should be remember-
ed that in the great territory which stretches from the Potomac to the Rio Grande,
bordered on one side by a mountain range bursting with mineral wealth and on the
other side by the Atlantic and the Gulf, there are many times as much coal and as
much iron as all Europe possesses; that in this same region stands on half of the timber
of the United States; that here is found the richest oil territory known in America;
that here centers a monopoly of the world's cotton production and the predestined
center of cotton manufacturing as well; here are found wheat and corn and rice and
sugar; here fruits of all varieties find their most perfect development; here is found
a uniform rainfall, with a climate ranging from the cold of the high mountains of
Virginian and Carolina to the warmth of the far South. It is in this favored region
that the highest activities known to the human race are to find their greatest opportunity
and reap their most abundant financial rewards."

Cotton bales used in manufacturing - in 1880 - 225,000 - in 1905 - 2,163,000 bales - value cotton crop 1905 - 680,000,000 - Pig iron - in tons - 3,300,000 and coal mined in 1880 - 6 million tons - in 1905 - 67 million tons - railroad mileage 1880 - 20,000 and 1895 - 60,000 -

Farm products 1880 - 660 million - 1905 - 1,750,000 dollars. Lumber products - 1880 - 39,000,000 - 19905 is 250,000,000- valued manufactured products - 1880 - 4457 millions - 1905 - 1,750,000,000 - assessed property in 1905 - 6,000,000,000- NWS

Page 70

(1905) At one period - in my younger days - 1840-1846 - my beloved Mother - had the purpose in her mind - to have me take the Profession of Medicine - the plan was that at the proper time - I was to go to Brooklyn - New York and study - and be under the instruction and care of my Mother's oldest brother - Uncle John Coffin Fanning, MD - He died 9th March 1846 - which event put a complete and final end - to my Mother's purpose - after that is was a "drift" - for me - for some time - though finally I dropped into the work of an Accountant - commencing with - "posting" my Uncle Phineas Fanning's books - In those days of the 40's or 50's - in event of sickness in families - should it become lengthy and the members of the family - worn and fatigued with care and from broken rest - then it was customary to go out and call on friends -"to come and nurse the sick" - the day of the "Trained Nurse" as we have it now had not dawned and little was known of them - in the small towns of our Southland - hence "friends" - were called to the rescue - and always willing hearts and hands always responded - I had gained some good will in this line - and for many years - I was requested to come and help - so far as I could by "reading" - was prepared to give assistance - in our day and time - we had - a serious fever - called "Bilious Fever" - the practice of medicine gave - "Calomel" - it followed the patient - was denied "water" - you must know - there was no "Ice" - to be had - in summer or in fact hardly at any time in those days - the method of "Manufactured Ice" - was unknown - and what came in later years to our town - was from the North - New York and Maine - and sold generally at first - from 4 to 6 cents per pound - by retail - think of the child - with burning fever - the summer heat 85 to 98 degrees - and no drink allowed. But so the wise MD's - of my younger days - practiced and prescribed and ---- killed. x-

Page 71

A Bilious fever tale - about 1840 -

My Cousin Phin Wood - a boy of 10 - sick for many days at Uncle PWF's - with that same "old bilious fever" - burning fever - hot days and nights - in August - dosed with Calomel -

Oh! my son (say Mother Mary F.) -"cannot allow any water" - Dr H. says - no - no - no - no-!!!!

Here follows the story he told me - "sick and suffering and famished - one Saturday night - my Father John - after certain washings - forgot to remove all water from the room - as had been done faithfully - every day and night - heretofore - and my parents retired - I could not sleep - and so lay awake - sick and feverish - the night advanced - thirst was intense - Oh! Could I only have just one swallow of water - there I lay and suffered - finally I resolved to get up - weak and sick as I was and search for some "forbidden water" - softly and silently and carefully - out of bed - moving with care - to my great delight - I found a basin - in it was water - I drank my fill and to this day - remember the taste of the soap and the sand and dirt in my mouth - But Oh! It was so delightful and so sweet - crawled back to bed - soon sleep came and next day - Dr. said I was much better - I improved at once and now living 50 years after this "surly stolen water are secret" - The water in that basin - which I drank - was the same - my father had washed his feet in -!" x WS

Page 72

(1263 AD to 1800 AD)- Yonge - Elizabeth and Johanna Yonge Line -Mr. Richard Morris

The William McKenzie - who came to America - about 1746 - was the Original Ancestor - so far as American Kinsfolk pertain - His ancestors - were Scotch - the family seats - being Loed Castle - New Torbel - Castleron - all in Cromerty County - 100 miles from Edinburgh - McKenzies first family - of the Fitz Gerald of Kildare - distinguished soldier was Collin Fitz Gerald - King (Alexander 3rd) gave him favor and title and the Barony of Kintail - Kennison succeeded and took the name of McKennis - after the highland manner and MacKensies by the English - son seceded - ( ) - Alexander - Roderick - Kenneth - Colin - down to 1726 - 1732 - 1746 by Generations -

Arms of the MacKensies of Cromerty - (are quarterly) viz: -

1st on a mountain inflamed proper for the name of McLeod

2nd Blue - a stags head - for the name of McKenzie

3rd - Gules - 3 legs - armed and spurred - belonging to McLeod - as old possessions of the

"Isle of Man"

4th - Argent - on a pole sable - an impressed crown within treasure gules for the name of Erskine of Innondale-

Crest - sun in splendor - motto - "Iucro non uro" -----

William McKenzie -(original) - reached America soon after Battle of Culloden - in which William kin participate and some had joined the Rebellion - such acts possibly hurried William - to leave the Country of Scotland- we find William McKenzie in the colony and later married to Catherine Campbell - daughter of William Campbell - member of Kings Counsel- Colony of Virginia - this union produced - sons George and John - daughter Christian* - who became Mrs Phillip Yonge - and Anna Jean who married Simpson

Christian McKenzie married Phillip Yonge - sons - William and Henry

Betsey - who married Robert Gibbs

Eliza C. - who married Richard Bradley Senior

*Christian McKenzie Yonge - becoming a widow - married for her 2nd husband - Jas. Fleming- children Mary - 2nd wife of Robert Gibbs and sister to his first wife - Betsy

Anna Bella - married William Giles

Susan - never married and was known as Aunt Susan

Daniel Fleming -

Note - Mrs. Christian (Campbell) - widow Phillip Yonge and wife of Jas. Fleming in April 1791 - was living at Brown Marsh - Bladen Co. - NC- when he ( ) James Fleming had a plantation - here sister Anna Jean (Campbell) Simpson - lived in Wilmington NC-

Page 73

William - son Phillip Yonge and Christian McKenzie - married Leila Leithiher - of French descent - and had one daughter (only child) - John-Anna Yonge of Savannah Georgia who married Richard Morris - of Wilmington NC

Children - Charles - Born 14 Jan 1835 -

Mary Elizabeth - July 28/1887 - married NW Schenck - Nov 3 -1858 -

Issue- Mary C. - Eliza F. - Richard ( no issue - died Oct 12 - 1862 - yellow fever

epidemic) - Ada B. -Josie E. - Margaret S. - William C. and James S.

Jonathan Pope Calder - born 17 -1840 - married Addie Polly - 2 sons and 1

Daughter - married 2nd wife _______

Elizabeth Ann - born 14 July 1844 - married M. Iver - Annie R - married Nila -

Herbert D. Leila and Betty (Betty died June 9 1879)

Susan F - born July 14 - 1846 - married T. Whitaker - Hattie M. - Josie Y - Mary S.

Betsy Yonge - married Robert Gibbs - children Phillip and Robert - who never married - issue

3 sons - Rev. George M - who married "Asenath Morgan" - issue - Sarah(1)-

John (4) -Sophia (3) - Anna (5) - Willie (2) - George (6)

Margaret Lila - born 14 Oct 1848 - married Corbie - ( ) ( ) -

Lula L - Married McIver

Richard -Phillip Y. - Richard ( ) - Nick Nixon - Jas Dickson these 5 boys - all died

no more - Richard died - Feb 22 - Nick N. ( ) 2x rest ( )

Eliza Claudia Yonge - married Richard Bradley 1769- his 2nd wife - children-

Richard - who married 1825 Jane Williams of Ohio - issue - Amoset G. -

Eliza - Richard and John

Henry W. - married Cutler (California)

Alfred O. Frances Lippert - issue - Jaines (a daughter)

James A Phillip (Charles - never married - died in Raleigh) ( ) in California

Christian - married Rev. WW Ecles - no issue - lived in Philadelphia (adopted

a daughter) - (Rev WWE Presbyterian Divinity)

Mary - married Wingate - 12 children South - NO

Lucy - married - Stephen Jewett - (2nd wife) - children - 5 sons and 2 daughters

"Yonge" - "Bradley" -"Willie" - " ? " - "Henry" - "Lockett O" and "Robt. D"

Page 74

Mary - daughter - Jas. Fleming and Christian (Campbell McKenzie) Yonge (widow Phillip Yonge) - married Robert Gibbs - his 2nd wife - Mary was sister of Robert Gibbs 1st wife - Betsey Yonge - (one mother)

Children - 4 daughters and 1 son

Christian - who married Campbell - daughter "Sophia"

Anna Bella - married Peter Mallett - issue - Susan G. - Charles - Robert G - Jas J. - Pierre -

George H - Murray (Rena ? )

Jimonsime - married Jno. M. Walker - issue - John - Lucian - Fleming - Margaret

Emma - married Jus. Munsey - died NC (issue)

Adam Empie - married Josephine A Church - issue - Jas. - Bertie - Flossie - Arthur (Irving first child - died and buried -Clinton NC)

Anna Bella - daughter Jas. Fleming and Christian McKenzie Yonge - married William Giles

Issue - issue 3 daughters and 2 sons

Anna Bella - married Doct Norwood - Hillsboro NC (issue)

Margaret - married Yonge - (issue) Phillip Yonge of Savannah

Christias - never married (James Giles - no record)

William Burke Giles - married Almenia Reston - issue - Jonathan Reston - Norwood -

Clayton - James

The Family Tree of the Jno. Shapless and Jane Moore (his wife) - 1662 - They came to Penn.

14 - 6 mo 1682 - his generation decedents - till we come to Elizabeth 1734 Shapless -

(dau. John) - married Richard Bradley 15 may 1755 - (4th son John Bradley) - he had a son Richard born 1769 - married Rebecca Green - ( 3 dau. - Dr. Sam Green ) - children - 1st wife - Richard* who married Mary Fisher - issue Chas. F. - Mary Constance and Eliza G - This Eliza G - became Mrs (Dr.) John Hill - 10 children - this Richard * must have been the one who married E. Claudia Yonge - as Richard Bradley (Amoret father ) was sister to Mrs. Dr Jno. Hill and not the Richard Bradley - born 1759 or 1769 - as the Family Tree indicates - This is the connections - as shown by marriage - descendants of "Shapless" " Lords" - "Bradley's" - "Wright's" - Wooten - Empie - Hills - Jewetts - Meares - Wingate - Yancey - Yonge - Gibbs - Fleming _Giles - Hatteridge - Dudley - Crook - Morris - Bernanrd - Lloyd- Owens - ? - Swann - London, etc - NWS

Page 75

From page 65 - (NWS - travels and sojourns and visits)

At New berry - by invited from Owen MR - Dec 25 - 1905 -to April 1 -1906-

Spartanburg SC with WG and Eliza - April 1- 1906 - June 1 -1 1906 -

With Daisy - went to Hickory NC - June 1 -1906- to September 7 -1906-

Norfolk Virginia with Josephine and EN Baker - Sept 7 - 1906 -to March 2 -1907

Spartanburg SC - with WG and Eliza - March 13 -1907 to March 30 -1907

To New berry - March 31 - 1907 - Willy GH -Senior - died April 30 -1907 and by letter from Capt - THH - Eliza and Owen advice - I went to Spartanburg SC - to help EHH - in her Insurance Agency - arrived May 7 - next day came Eliza - Graham and Miss Maggie H - on May 10 - came Mrs. St. Clair - John and Miss - CC ( ) - arranged for business - telegraphs - renew ( ) - set to work - and conducted office and remained - instructing EHH and doing the work - examining books - etc - till July 26 - 1907 - J. Mann James came June 10 - and relieved me and assisted and I took vacation - July 26 - going to THH - was home - at Charlotte NC by invites - spent a lovely 10 days and left Aug 5 and reached Wil. NC same day - and stopped with my sister in law - (Mrs. Sue Whitaker) - Aunt Kate - Julia - Col Taylor - James - ( ) - Cummings - John Wright - Lord - Arthur and then called to see me - a fine visit- Sept 30 - 1907 - took car for Columbia - reached Newberry - Oct 2 and proceed to Spartanburg SC - Oct 12 to relieve J. Mann James - as he goes home on Oct - 15 - 1907 - conducted office affairs from Oct 12 - to Dec 22 - Eliz. ( ) and G. to Newberry - Dec 22 to Jan 2- 1908 - Christmas and New Year - Spartanburg SC - Jan 2 - 1908 - to June 25 - 1908 - as E - could conduct affairs without help - Made out administrators report Estate- WJH - deceased and left all matters in order and complete in every way - visited Josephine ENB - Spartanburg - June 26 - 1908 - to Aug 30 - Aug 30 - to Sept 13 - 1908 - with Ada - at Hickory NC - Left Hickory - Sept 13/1908-

Page 76

Arrived Black Mountain NC and with Lyda - Sept 13 to 18th - Hickory NC - Sept 19/29 - 1908 left and arrive at New Bern - NC -Sept 29/1908 and this is home by invite Neb B and Josephine - 124 Craven St (now located) - to Beaufort NC -Aug 22 -1909 - to Aug 30 - At Miss Emma D Manson - New Bern NC - Aug 31 to July J- 1910 -Left New Bern - Dec 21 - 1908 to attend wedding WCS and Caroline Jones Newberry - Dec 29, 1908 - remained Dec 22-28, 24-25-28/29 ( ) r/11 then to New Bern via Wilmington both ways -

Left - July 6 for Black Mountain - remained at Emma's - till Aug 27 - 1910

At Hickory with Ada - Aug 27-1910 to Oct 1- 1910

New Bern NC - Oct -1910 - to March 18- 1911

Elizabeth City - NC - March 19 - 20 - 1911 at Pools

Richmond Va - March 21 - April 6 - 1911 - at Borden

Norfolk Va - April 7 - 8 - 9 - 10th - at Borden

New Bern NC - April 10 - 6PM at home and all OK - 1911 and remained since - moved (1911)

May 29/30/31 - June 1 - to 89 Broad Street - and fixed and better secure - etc

Page 78

History of American Schenk's-

"In tracing the history of the Captain John Schenck homestead the author goes back to the fifteenth century. Hendrick Schenck Van Nydock, night, Lord of Afferden and Walbeck and Feoffer of Wachtendonck, a man of importance in the low countries, was the ancestor of the Schenck who founded the family in America. This old dwelling, a fine photograph picture of which appears in Mr. Ditmas book stands on Mill Island, and is more than two hundred and fifty years old and is probably, the oldest habitable house in Kings County, if not in New York State"

My ancestor was Jan or John - NW Schenck

"Martense Schenck" - had a son John - who came to America - about 1650 - from the Netherlands - (Holland -Europe) - settling what is now known - as Flatlands - Long Island - New York - and he had a brother - "Roeloff" - and both lived in (Amersfoot) - now Flatlands - near Brooklyn NY-

"John" married "Jannetjie Van Voorhees" - he bought the island and from Elbert E. Stoothoff - about Dec 29, 1657 - Known as "Crooks Mill" near Berjan Island - bought about 20 acres land (Flatland) - Aug 20 -1660 - and took oath of allegiance - in 1687 - on Jan 26 - 1688 or 9 - made a will and devised to his son Martin - the mill and Island and to his son Stephen - the "Canarsie Lands and Meadows" at "Hodge Neck" - see Conveyance Book - page 140 - ( ) 1 - Brooklyn - New York Records -

Roeloff and Jan Schenck Van Nydeck - came to New Netherlands -(NY) - 1650 sister Johanna came 1683 - Original emigrants and ancestors - ( ) and ( ) - AD Schenck - Lieut - 2 US Ant - Rev Garrett Schenck - says - original name was Schenck Van Nydeck- in Holland-

John Schenck and wife Jane had following issue-

(1) Jane - born about 1673 - married John Dorlant - May 20 -1692

Page 79

(2) Martin - born 1675 -

(3) Willemtjie Jane born - 1677(?) - married Peter Wyckoff - Mammoth NJ

(4) Stephen - (5) Johannes - (8) Aletta - (9) Anne - 4 and 5 died young - 8 and 9 no record

(6) Neeltjie - baptized Nov 23 - 1683 - married James Wyckoff - Oct 12 - 1712 - ? NJ

(7) Steven - born Feb 2 - 1685 - the Mill farm - SE part of Flatlands - he married Ann - (dau of Nicholas Wyckoff) - Oct 23 - 1712 - she was born Aug 29 - 1693 and died July 15 - 1766 in her 73 year - This Steven Schenck is said to have built the first - Canarsie Point house ( ) there-

The children of Steven S and Ann Wyckoff - viz: -

1- Jane - born June 27 - 1715 - married Folgart Spring - Jane died March 20 -1778 - Folgart died

Oct 25 - 1807 - his 89th year

2- John - born May 23 - 1718 - died Dec 15 -1775 - Oyster Bay - issue (2-1)

3- Sarah - born No 24 1720 - died Dec 3 - 1797 - married ? - Gravesend LI

4- Ann - born June 1 - 1723 - died Aug 1 - 1803 - married Abram Dusyee - Fishkill Plains - NY

5- Wilhelmina - born Oct 15 - 1726 - died Dec 18 - 1802 - married Peter Ammuman - Flatlands

6- Nelly - born April 28- 1730 - died Oct 9 - 1784 - married Nicholas Williamson - Jamica - LI

No issue

*7- Nicholas - born Sept 4 - 1732 - died April 3 - 1810 - married Wilhelmina Wyckoff - lived at

Canarsie Point

8- Margaret - born June 17 -1735- died April 8 1814 - married Peter J Montifort - Fishkill Plains

9- Maria - born March 28 -1739 - died May 13 - 1813 - married Samuel Sylvester - Gravesend LI

Note - Steven gave Canarsie Farm to his issue - Capt Nicholas - only son living at Canarsie his death - Nov 6 - 1767 - NWS

Page 80

* Nicholas - (2nd son of Steven) born Sept 4- 1732 - married Wilhelmina Wyckoff - Oct 10 -1757 - (known as Capt Nicholas) - died April 3 - 1810 and Wilhelmina - born Dec 23 - 1736 - died Sept 12 -1779 - Lived at Canarsie Point

Their children were -

1- Stephen - born July 18 - 1758 - died Dec 14 - 1787 - married Jane Vandeveer - 2 sons - Jerome and Stephen (Oyster Bay LI)

2- John - born Oct 7 - 1760 - died March 28 - 1833 - Married Annette Williamson - Jan 18 - 1783

Issue 10 children - 1-Willafred -2- Hettie- 3- Steven - 4-Ann - 5- Nicholas - 6 - Lucretia - 7-

Ida - 8- John - 9- Jeremiah - 10 - Wilhelmina I - (see Notes)

3- Anna - born March 19 - 1763 - married Hezkiah Davis - lived in Philadelphia - Davis was

American soldier - Rebel or C - during war - ?

*4- Nicholas - born July 23/1765- married Aletta Ramseur - he died Sept 10 -1836 - Aletta - died

6th May 1855- lived at Canarsie -(both died at Canarsie)

5- Wilhelmina - born Feb 19 - 1767 - died Sept 28 - 1767 - an infant

6- Adriana - born Aug 22 - 1768 - died Sept 1 -1830 - she married "Cornelius Stry Kee" errors noted in text

Nicholas Schenck born Feb 23 - 176 - married Aletta Ramseur -(only daughter and child of Anthony Ramseur and Jane Burter) - April 20 - 1788 - Aletta was born Brooklyn - Dec 3 - 1768 - died at Canarsie LI - May 6- 1855 (age 87)

children-

1- Anthony Ramseur - born Feb 7 - 1790 - married - died - Sept 15 - 1871 (age 81)- children Maggie married Williamson - Aletta married ? - Nicholas married ? - Steven married?

Page 81

2- Jane - born March 19 - 1792 - died May 28 - 1843 - married Ralph Maline - children-

Jno. Schenck - Julia (Dieter and Pyke) - Mary (?) - Evan Johnson (who?)

3 - Wilhelmina - born Dec 30 -1794 - died Jan 18 -1816 - in her 22 year - a handsome girl

*4 - Wilhelmas (father of NW Schenck 1830-1916) - born Aug 20 - 1797 - married Eliza Ann

Fanning - William died March 16 - 1832 - issue - Adaline (Bradley) -Aletta Jane (Cooper)

Nicholas William (Morris and Holmes) 1830

5 -James - born April 19 - 1800 (died Brooklyn 105 2nd Place) - never married (last at Canarsie Farm) (Uncle Jimmy last one)

6 - Abner - born Sept 12 - 1802 - married Katie Raynor - he died (one daughter Mary Eliz.)

7 - Maria - born May 31 - 1805 - died in her 10th year

8 - Steven - born June 30 - 1808 - died May 15 - 1842 - never married - (died at Canarsie Farm house-)

Tradition Says - A fisherman named "Horn" - had a cabin at "Canarsie Point" on the shore - about 1660 - called "Fishers Hook" - xxxx

? - Steven Schenck died Nov 6 - 1767 - he had 2 sons (John and Nicholas) and 7 daughters living - John died 1775 - and left no issue - lived at Oyster Bay LI -

Nicholas - known as Capt Nicholas inherited and lived at Canarsie - it is said he built the present Canarsie House (1910 ) - now standing - grandma Aletta and Uncle Jimmie - told me in 1849 (at Canarsie on a visit) -that the first house - stood - in the garden (then) - towards the ? - and I've figured it out - we made the date of building 1772 - and I painted this date on the "Spread Eagle" - that was on the transom window - over the north front door - and so it remains to this day - I hope - the "old house" - stands now in a park - at Canarsie. NWS

Page 82

Nicholas - born Sept 23 1765 - he died Sept 10 -1836 - leaving Canarsie Point Farm to his sons - James and Steven - and the west ? And land in wood to Anthony Ramseur (his eldest son)

they had to pay certain legacies and etc - Steven died in 1842 - gave James lifetime interest and then in his namesake -"Steven" - son of A Ramseur S - "Uncle Jimmie" - James a bachelor -died 1882-about - farm sold and divided proceeds to heirs - Canarsie then ceased to be -

Residence of Schencks - Uncle James - the last occupant - and left no issue - never married -

The best legal evidence as to the Schenck ownership of Canarsie - is the fact of "A Deed" - setting forth the metes and bounds - and signed by several (7) Indian Chiefs - said document is now in possession of one of the Brooklyn societies - as given by my Uncle Abram Schenck and my cousin "George McCarthy" - Adms. of my Uncle James Schenck - the last resident of Canarsie Farms - estate sold - etc - some fanciful brain - has said "deed was matter on a clam shell" and another story - land bought for a "bottle of whiskey" - all myths. xxx

Capt Nicholas S - born - 1732 - married 1757 - his wife Wilhelmina - died in 1799 - in her 43rd year - as Capt N - lived till 1810- he was a widower some years - and married for his second wife - "Jane Remseuer" - widow of A. Ramseur and mother of her son Nick's wife "Aletta" - this is only hearsay - don't know it - true or false - Great grandma Jane lived and died at Canarsie - so my mother has told me.

Steven - 1st son of Capt N - died in 1787 - his 30th year - I have heard he left 2 sons - which then GF had brought to Canarsie and these then remained till men or near grown - Schools funded for by there loving grand father (Jerome and Steven by name) there mother was a Van de Veer - and lived at Oyster Bay. NWS

Page 83

Memo - looking at the record and things about days of American Revolution - we find Battle of Long Island - was August - The British line of March and the Battle along the roads - was from 3 to 4 miles from Canarsie Homestead - 1777 - "They heard the guns" - GGF Capt. Nicholas Schenck - was then 45 years old - and married - his wife Wilhelmina - about 40 - all living at Canarsie LI - of their children - Stephen was 19 - John (father of Jeremiah, etc and GF of Lucretia Mills and Wilhelmina Schenck) was 17 - of Anna - 1st daughter - born March 19 1763 - married Davis - Nicholas (my Grand Sire) born 1765 - was a boy of 12 yrs and Adriana - born Aug 22 - 1768 - was a girl of 9 years - (3 boys and 3 girls) - living -

The British were victorious - soon took possession of the entire West end of Long Island -"Brooklyn" -"Gravesend" - "Flatlands" - "Flatbush" etc - issued protection to the farmers and inhabitants to attend to their business - "keep the peace" and they would be protected

- Negroes their slaves in service - I don't know of any Oaths or other methods "to serve the King" - the British were kind and just - allowing the farmers sufficient for stock and family - what their Q.M. took - was paid for on the spot at a fair price - this had effect to borrow quiet and the Dutch farmers - soon knew good customers - x- Accepted "British Gold" for their crop - Hence few left - to enlist under Geo. W(ashington) "banner"-

Note - Grandmother Aletta S - was 8 yrs old when Am. Revolution began and 15 when Peace came (born 1768) - lived with her parents - Anthony Ramseur and Jane Burtis - near the present "Brooklyn Navy Yard" - then called "Wallabout" - Her father had a Dutch Mill on the ground - she married Nicholas Schenck 1788- in her 20th year and lived all her days after marriage at Canarsie - for 67 years - she told me in 1849/1856 on my visit to Canarsie - will remembering the "War" - the soldiers and described the "Hessian" - she had a superstition -"that May was bad luck month for the Schencks'" as I recall her - small in stature - always dressed in black - and not weighing above 110 pounds - very active - as my first recollection 1849 - she was 80 yrs old - attended ( ) - household - her mother Jane Burits - was a large woman - weight near 190 pounds - who held me as a baby - but no recollection (so says my mother)-Nick W Schenck

Page 84

Captain Nicholas Schenck - born - Sept 4 1732 - Canarsie Farm on Jamica Bay - Long Island-

7 miles from Fulton Ferry - Brooklyn NY - his father Steven gave him "Canarsie Farms and Woodland" - Capt Nick gave these lands to his (2) sons -

John and Nicholas -(only these sons living at time his death) - died 1810-

John lived on the portion of Farm - directly north from the "Old Homestead" and in a line with Tower at Cypress Country and on north side of road running about West - to the village - and about 120 yards from water line Jamica Bay - John - son Capt Nicholas - born Oct 7 - 1760 - married Annie - issue - as I recall -

John married Annie Williamson - see opposite page - +++

see the other side- page 85

Page 85

Memo - of "John Schenck" -(son of Capt Nicolas Schenck) - born Canarsie - LI - Oct 7 1760 - married January 18- 1783 - Annie Williamson - she died March 27 - 1852 (very old)- their children (10 in all) - (John died March 28 - 1833)-

1- Williamtjie - born - Oct 29 - 1784 - died Sept 27 - 1868 - married Lott

2 - Hettie - born July 15 - 1787 - died Dec 2 - 1846 - married Surdam - "Ann and Elizabeth -

John Schenck"

3- Steven- born March 3 - 1790 - died Feb 5 - 1847 - married widow Vandeveer- Lucretia Mills dau

4- Ann - born Sept 7 - 1772 - died Aug 29 - 1832 - married Stillwell

5 - Nicholas J. - born Nov 25 - 1794 - died Aug 10 - 1864 - married Mills

6- Lucretia - Born - 1797 - died May 4 - 1818 - died in her 21st year

7- Ida - born - Dec 20 - 1802 - died - Nov 9 - 1886 - married John Lott - a son John - who

Married Aletta Schenck

8- John - April 14 - 1800 - died March 22 - 1863 - married Ramseur

9 - Jeremiah - March 16 - 1806 - died Sept 19 - 1863 - married Julia Petitt - father Rocka?

(Wilhelmina ?)

10 - William I - born - March 3 - 1810 - died Sept 1885 - married Sharp - New York City

Note by NWS - of the above - I have met - Nicholas (who stuttered) - Ida - John - Jeremiah and William I - and some of the children - Suydams - Jno. Lott and sons and ? and cousin Julie Petitt and at my living north and visits - cousin Lucretia Mills - Wilhelmina - Jacob Ramseur and son and Richard Ramseur - Ann Sydam and Jno. S. Suydam - never married - Elizabeth married - Richard Ramseur -(one son only child ) - and heir- Jacob - married Annie Pearsall Hubbard - only one son - JSS Ramseur - John Schenck Suydam Remseuer - (and Sole heir) - who married a widow - formerly - a Miss Weeks (Newberry SC)- knew all of Suydams and visited them often - was at Jacob's wedding with sister Maggie Morris - and who at wedding - Cousin Lucretia - at Canarsie - recall Aunt Annie - then an old woman - but active - Aunt Annie - mother Nick and Jere - lived with them at Canarsie - same time Lucretia Schenck - daughter of Steven - lived there as a girl of 20 - I visited Aunt Annie often in 1849 - visit Lucretia marry to Nat Mills - later with Cousin Julia Malburn Pyle - Dan is - good friend - NWS

Page 86

1- grandparents - Holland forebearer - Martense - Schenck line - NWS - forefathers and mothers - (all Holland on or decedents)

2- sons Jan and Roeloff - came to NY - about 1650 - sister Johannes later - Flatlands LI

3- Jan - married Jeannette Stern Van Voorhes - daughter of Dominick - about 1671 - 3 sons and

6 daughters

4- Steven - married - Ann Wyckoff - daughter of Nicholas - Oct 23 -1712 - 1st at Canarsie - bought of Indians - 2 sons and 7 daughters

5- Nicholas (Capt) - married - Wilhelmina Wyckoff - Oct 10 -1757 -(Stephen - John - Anna Nicholas - Wm. - Adriana) 4 sons and 2 daughters

6- Nicholas - married Aletta Ramseur - April 20 -1788 - (Ramseur - Jane - Wilhelmina -

Wm.- Jas.- Afa - Maria - Steven) 5 sons and 3 daughters

7- Wilhelmas - married Eliza Ann Fanning - 1824 - 2 daughter and 1 son - Adaline - Aletta -

Nicholas Wm.

8- Nicholas William - married Mary E. Morris - Nov 3 -1858 - Wilmington NC - 5 daughters

And 3 sons - M-L-R-A-J-Wm-Daisy-James - children of above (NC)

Mary Cooper Schenck 1859 - married Owen McRae Holmes - 1872 - Brooklyn - 106 St. Marks

Eliza Fanning 1860 - married John Justice Disosuray - 1889 - St Pauls Church Clinton St.

Brooklyn

Richard Morris - 1862 - Died in infancy buried at Clinton NC

Ada Bromley - 1864 - spinster - died June 17 1945 - buried in Wilmington NC

Josephine Empie - 1866 - no issue - married Eldward Neal Baker - 1891 - Brooklyn NY -

106 St. Marks

Margaret Standish - 1869 - spinster - died 1919 at Biltmore Hospital

William Cooper - 1871- died 1935 - married Caroline Jones - 1908 - Newberry SC - no issue

James - 1873 - died 1875 - Hickory NC

Mary C Schenck and OMR Holmes 1892 - children - 1st child boy - died at birth 1893

Owen ( ) born Mar 9 1895 - died June 15 1930 - married Allen? Summer S and two children

? died infancy July 1925 ( )

Nicholas Schenck Holmes - born July 24 1897 married Mary Poole - children Sarah Aug 21 1924

Mary Elizabeth July 24 - 1936 and Martha Aug 10 1928 ( AB Schenck)

Page 87

Fanning Line Ancestry - (NW Schenck fore fathers)

1- Mass - Edmund Fanning - born Ireland - 1620 - married Ellen - 1649 - came to America -

Fisher Island - 1653 - 5 sons and 2 daughters

2- Conn - Thomas Fanning- 1655 - Fisher Island married Frances Ellis - 3 sons and 2 daughters

3- Conn - James Fanning - born Stonington Conn - married Hannah Smith - 8 sons and 3 dau

4- LI - Phineas - born 1724- Smithtown LI - married Mehitobel Wells - 4 sons and 2 daughters

(Col PW)

5- Nantucket - Phineas - born Aug 6 - 1750 - married Keziah Coffin - Nantucket - 6 sons -

2 daughters (Lawyer)

6- LI - William Fanning - born - April 25 1780 - married Nancy Rogers Simmons - New York

City - 4 sons and 4 daughters

7- NY - Eliza Ann Fanning - born Oct 4 - 1805 - married William Schenck - Brooklyn NY -

2 daughters and 1 sons

8- Wil. - Nicholas Wm. Schenck - born Brooklyn Jan 8 - 1830 - married Mary Eliza Morris - Nov 3 - 1858 - Wil. NC 3 sons and 5 daughters

Mary C. Schenck - born 8-1-1857 Wilmington NC -d- 1-2-24 - married Owen McR Holmes

d- 1-19-14 - Newberry SC - 2 sons Nicholas and Owen McRae

Nicholas Schenck Holmes born 7-24-1897 - d - 12-17-1960 - Newberry SC - married Mary Wyche Poole - Greensboro NC -issue-

Sarah Poole - born Aug 21 - 1924 married Raymond Francis ? - May 23 1953 -Ashya Japan-

Issue - Mary ? April 15 1954

Mary Elizabeth - born July 29 1926 - married McDonald Lee Stephens - Jul 12 1947 - issue-

Ana Lee Richmond Va - July 16 1948 - Elizabeth Holmes - New Orleans July 11 1954

Martha Wyche - born Aug 15 1928 - married Thomas Howard Beasley - Nov 4 1950 - issue-

TH III - Roanoke Va June 10 -1953-

Page 89

Articles of furniture to be shipped to Minnie S. Holmes - November - 1901 - for care and her use- my property in her Newberry house - loaned to her for care-

(in parlor at Newberry) - 1 pir Glass - 27 in x 8 feet - 1 mantle mirror in cherry and one center table and 1 - parlor set - 6 pieces - standing lamp - cherry rocker - 1 mahogany table 17in x 25 in

1 oak table 22 x 22 (Shakespear - Art of the World in Paper) fancy ink stand in brass - (Caro Hooper gift) -5 fancy worked lozenge pillows and pictures 1 antique pitcher in white - some ornaments-

(upstairs NE room) - Black walnut bedstead - spring mattress - 2 hair mattress - 1 wash stand - 1 common seat chair - 1 black walnut - marble top bureau and glass -(oak -New Bern writing desk) - toilet set and table - 2 rockers - 1 oval MJ table - 1 qr oak table - 1 white small table - small chairs - square on floor 15 x 15 - 2 rugs 4 x 7 - 2 blankets - (1 lady writing desk -MEM -B with Brass set)

ABS now using 1936 Wadesboro NC

(Bedroom downstairs) - 1 folding bed and mattress - 1 leather chair (broken) - clock and bronze lady - book photographs of the world - books parlor - used in sitting room front - 4 feather pillows

(Minnies bedroom WCS room ? Room) - 1 bureau and glass - bureau (no glass) is broke - 1 big hamper- (marble top both bureaus) - 1 small hamper - red table covers - all bureaus with marble tops (3 in all)- Ada ? - red rug 32 x 56 - oak table 25 x 25 in (2 mattress on 2 bed) - box papers - cane seated chairs and rockers - in walnut-

(in hall downstairs) - hat rack with glass - students lamp - pictures- 2 military swords (try to locate) - on porch - 2 lattice seats and white rockers

Page 90

Furniture - in Minnie House - loaned to her - for care and use-

(in dining room) - B/W sideboard - marble top and qint glass Karnf - 1 plated ice pitcher (3 bronze candelabra - this given to Josephine at new house)- 1 set 6 silver Tray Service (presented to WCS and Caroline Jones on marriage - Dec 29 -1908) - spoon holder - marked MEM - bon-bon dish in plate - salad fork - cake ? marked MEM - oyster stand and lamp plated silver - (2 decanters - glass) small oak table - B/W dinner and 4 leaves - hanging shelf - (? Washington City - ? Broken) - (dinner leather chairs - bottoms and for dining room - some armed)

Note - All carpets - I sold Minnie for $50.00 and she deducted $5.00 for fitting and cutting

and paid this $35.00 to Daisy and Ada - in goods - I never saw a dime "sic transit"-xx

some books and other odds and ends - but not - material - all probably used - destroyed or worn out - a cutting table (feather bone) - bread and tray - rose ? lamps - tin boiler - ? - step ladder - blacking stool -

These were sent to Lyda - at Atlanta Ga - date - 1901 - and given her by me - viz

1 china closet and 1 book case and 2 parlor stools and 1 chiffonier and glass- (2 tables mahogany ? - for Mary (Cassidy) - a gift to Lyda - when we lived in Wil. NC -.

I have given Ada - certain silver - as named in Bill of sale - her possession - Hickory 1910-

Daisy has certain things - can't recall all - some jewelry - William CS rings - ABS - ring (3 diamonds) and pin (amethyst and aquamarine or Beryl)

Page 91

Oct 20 1901 - I gave Eliza Haughton - Spartanburg SC - 1 single B/W bedstead and mattress to fit - for Graham's rooms and use - 2 pictures framed - 3 sisters and Graces - 1 table old- 1 ? old- (2 feather pillows - marked "Hill") (Aunt Katie gave Annie)

Eliza - took possession off and kept with my consent-

1 plated coffee tern - old cut Glass ? - old decanter - plain - some painted chairs - a mahogany water (sink) - Mrs Holmes rocking chair - 1 white spread marked "S" - Annie old ? - 1 red rocker - Preserves in jars? - a rake - spade - hoe and hose - lawn mower - fancy basket - Japanese screen - also some crockery - glass bowl and Japanese big bowls - these things or some were Annie's and so to please - left and gave her

There was $25.00 in gold in Annie's trunk and it was given to Alice - toward marble slab for Mr and Mrs Holmes grave - Oakdale and Alice also took 3 center pieces- fine - Embroidery - some painted china and Annie's painted photo x. All the things in Annie's trunk (save jewelry were distributed to Alice - Eliza -Julia H and Annie) save a few - to Annie H - silver cup - marked "AEH Sept 18 1849" - to Annie Harrison - later she gave to Nick Schenck Holmes - ask Minnie - possession NSH 1937

Sent to Mrs. Jo Watters - plain gold bracelet and to Lee Wright cuff and collar buttons in gold and Geo. Wright - gold pencil - to Fanny Watters - silver ? and book.

Sent to Ada - 2 lozenge pillows and chaffing dish - pr white blankets - Marseilles spread (to Daisy Persian lamb cape) - 2 pr sheets - 4 pillow cases-x

Stored in Green trunk - napkins 31 - table cloths 5 - towels 35 - pillow cases 2 - center piece 1 - ? 2 - sheets 12 - 12 cotton curtains - 12 Indian ? Tea (used up) - 3 barrels crockery - sent to Hickory and rest sent to Newberry and used by Josephine and above linen - used at Biltmore now worn out - I have given - Josephine - the 3 candelabra in bronze - a painting of "Vis ? and his figures" (NWSchenck)

Page 92

Things and property at Josephines - New Bern NC -(June 1911)

One feather bed ( ? ) as roller bed - 2 sides - paid for repairs - $6.50 - by Josephine - this bed I bought for Alice - in 1893 - Brooklyn

one arm chair and 2 pillows - Christmas gift for girls-

one oak writing desk sent by WCS from Newberry SC - ( ? Old desk)

one trunk - marked N.W.S. and clothing and belongings - of wear and use - hats - canes - watch

( ) - 1 alligator bag - 1 small valise - 3 overcoats - 5 shirts - 7 pr shoes - etc - notes and big letter pocket and papers - 40 volumes of "Little Masterpieces" -

5 vols -"History of U.S." - "Fanning Coat of Arms" - "Pictures and photos" - of friends -

diaries - of 1900 - to 1911 and going on and to continue-

"Book of Records" - "Family History and Biography" and sketches and incidents - of city as written by N.W.S.-

Also some crockery and glass dishes - from Hickory NC -

the 3 candelabra - in bronze - 5 lights - I give to Josephine -x

June 29 1911 - WC Schenck letter 29 - reports he has records from Minnie - of my furniture - Newberry SC - 2 pictures - B/W dinning table and leaves - 1 mahogany side board - 1 bureau - 1 hat rack - 11 chairs - loaned to WCS

Page 94

Nicholas Wm. Schenck - (son of Wm. Schenck - Canarsie LI born Aug 20 - 1797 - died Brooklyn LI 1832- and Eliza Ann Fanning - Brooklyn LI - Oct 4 1805 -died Dec 21 - 1884 suddenly at about 10 PM - 105 2nd Place - married in 1824)

born - Brooklyn LI - January 8 -1830 - married Mary Eliza Morris Nov 3 1858- (dau of Richard and Johanna Morris) - born Wil. NC July 28 1837- Mary Eliza - died Hickory - Feb 26 1876 - buried Wil. NC - Oakdale Cemetery - children-

Mary Cooper - born Wil. NC - Aug 1 - 1859 - married OMR Holmes (born June 11 -

1853) - 1891 - children Owen - b- March 7 1895 - died Jan 15 1930

Nicholas Schenck - July 24 - 1897

Eliza Fanning - born Wil. NC - Sept 19 - 1860 died July 31 1949 - married Jno. J. Disosuray

Dec 11 - 1889 - children - Margaret Sept 17- 1890 - 2 sons 1 daughter

Jno. Schenck - June 25 - 1895 - died - issue 2 sons

Richard Morris - born Wil. NC - Feb 15 - 1862 - died and buried in Clinton NC - April1863-

Ada Bromley - born Wil. NC - January 12 - 1864 - died June 17 - 1945 - buried Oakdale

Wilmington NC

Josephine Empie - born Brooklyn NY - May 19 - 1868 - married Edward Baker - Nov 10 -1891

(Nix) Brooklyn NY - 106 St Marks Ave - no issue - died Jan 23 1933 - buried Norfolk Va

Margaret Standish - born Brooklyn NY - Aug 20 1868 - died 1918 - no issue

William Cooper - born Brooklyn NY - Aug 9 1871 - married Caroline Jones - no issue - died

Nov 1935

James - born Wilmington NC - Oct 10 1873 - died Hickory NC - Dec 1875 - buried Hickory

cemetery

2nd wife of Nicolas Schenck - married Annie E - Oct 4 - 1892 - born Sept 18 1849 - died 5:45 PM Charlottesville Va - Feb 18 - 1901 - buried Oakdale Cemetery - Wil. NC (died suddenly)

{daughter of Owen Davis Holmes - born March 31 - 1824 - died March 23 1883 - married Ann Moore Hill - born Dec 27 1822 - died Dec 4 1891}

Page 95

Noted MPH-

1- Mary Cooper Schenck born Wilmington NC - aug 1 - 1859 - married June 11, 1853 to Owen McRee Holmes (died 1-19-1910) - died Jan 2 1924 - buried Newberry SC - two sons-

A- Owen McRee Holmes - born March 7 1895 - died Jan 15 1930 - buried in Newberry SC

Married Albracth (b - Nov 7 1902) - one son - 1-Owen McRee Jr. Born June 9 1925

2-One daughter Mary July 20 1923 - died infancy - April 5 1926

B- Nicholas Schenck born July 24 1897 (d -Dec 17 1960 -Oakdale)- married Mary Ponce-

B- May 26, 1902 (d -4 dec 1971 -Oakdale) Oct 30, 1923 West Market Methodist Church

Greensboro NC - three daughters-1- Sarah Poole Holmes born Aug 21 1924 - married

Raymond Francis Spohrer on May 23 1953 at Ashiya Japan - issue A-Mary Frances born

Greensboro NC April 15 1954 B- Robert Holmes - born Dec 17 1964 - Mississippi

2- Mary Elizabeth born July 29 1926 married McDonald Lee Stephens - Holy Trinity

Church Greensboro NC -July 12 1947 - issue (4 daughters)

a-Ann Lee Stephens born July 16 1948 Richmond Va

b- Elizabeth Holmes Stephens born July 11 1954 New Orleans La

c- Martha Bromley Stephens -born Aug 2 1955 New Orleans La

d- Mary McDonald Oct 30 1959 - New Orleans La

3- Martha Wyche - born Aug 15 1928 married Thomas Howard Beasley Jr. (b-Feb 15)- Holy

Trinity Church Greensboro NC Nov 4 1950 - issue-

a- Thomas Howard Beasley III - born June 10 1953 - Roanoke Va.

b- Nicholas Holmes Beasley - born Sept 1 1955 Roanoke Va.

Page 96
Page 97

Charles Beatty Mallett (brother to Col. Peter)

Children - Jno. Wright - Oct 10 - 1842 - married Margaret (May 20 -1873)

Chas. Peter - Sept 12/44 - married Pattie Aiken 1887 - children-

Margaret Wright born 1868- -- R. Lee Holmes born 1866

Children - Caroline and R. Lee

Caroline Greene - April 29 - 1848 - m Ewd. J. Hale - 2nd wife

Margaret Anderson - June 6 - 1850

Chas. Beatty - Nov 27 1851 - married - children Jane Carter - 1872- m Overton

Marion A - 1874

Alice Hazelton - April 4 1857 - Thomas Hale 1914

Edward Mallette - killed in battle of Bentonville 1865 - m - Mary Hunter - Mrs (Pattie Mallett)

OM Raycte's parents - children -

Simmons Baker - 1852 - moved to Texas after marriage Annie

Jon Hunter - 1854 - married in Florida - Mary ?

Pattie 1857 m OM Royster- OMR- died Sept 1902- buried Hickory NC-(No issue)

Sallie Johnston -

Caroline E - (sister Col Peter) Married Hooper

children Geo. M. m Charlotte J. Waddell

Chas. Mallett Hooper m Lucy Yonge relative of grand mother E. Johanna Yonge Morris

Jno. DeB.- March 3 1853

(our Caro)Caroline Alice - April 1 1857 - single

ABS - don't know children Dr. Wm. V. Mallett - who lived at Chapel Hill - his wife was a "Walker" - DeBernierre - Eliza - Sophie - John ? Mrs.Mc? - sons William DeB and George

Page 98

Col. Peter Mallett born 1822 married (Nov 13 1848)- Anna Bella Gibbs (May 18 0 1824) - died in Brooklyn- Buried in Oakdale -NC- Col. Peter died at Wilmington NC buried Oakdale Cemetery-

Children- Susan Gibbs - born (Oct 10 - 1849) married January 5 1881 - Gabriel Holmes - born

Sept 10 -1851 - Gabe Holmes died Sept 1 1903 (51 yrs-11mos-20days)

Oakdale -

children - Pierre M - born May 11 1883 - Wil. NC

Owen - born 1889 - Wil. NC

Charles Edward - born 1851 - married 1890 -Ida Beach - children- Caroline Louisa - April 4 - 1891 - Brooklyn NY

Married Bellamy- Wil. NC

Pierre - 1893

Dorothy - July 1894 - ? Baby

- Robert Gibbs - born March 3 1853 - died in Mobile Ala (unmarried)

- James Flemming - born 1856 - married Lera Beach - Jas. Mallett died Wil. -

Oct 22/1906 - Buried "Oakdale Cemetery" - Wil. NC - (no issue)

- Eugene P - born - April 1 - 1861 - (M.D.)

- George Hooker - born May 5 1863 - (M.D.) - married Rena Dismuka - Dec 10 -

St. Augustine Fla.

A character? Fridge Mallett M.D. - born 1820 - married "Hardin" - later she married Col - Chase

A mystery?

children - Virginia married "Landon" - out West

Caroline married "Jenks"

Henry Seymore - never married - died 1893 - Morehead NC

Fridge - died near Morehead - buried cemetery at Newbern NC - In later days - had drug store at Morehead NC-

Page 99
Page 100

North corner of Market and East 2nd Street Mom Tena stand - peanuts ? Candy - potato pie ginger

? cakes, apples etc.

A- Bettencourt corner - gable hip roof frame - 2 story -occupied as store - Rue and Files adjacent - Emanuel Bettencourt - uncle to WCB- liquor and etc. - negro man Cush

B- row one story brick -x- occupied as UP Post Office by postmaster Dudley - after the Dawson fire - old PO burnt out at the Clarendon Hotel - Front Street - who many years by- WC Bettencourt - always PM as long as Democrats had power at Wash. DC - afterwards Pallin bake shop and before him was Geo. W Cohen - baker with his 1-2-3-4 cut pies - denoting apples - peach- mince etc - these 5 stores escaped every conflagration visited by Wilmington - and remain now - 1905

C- Brick - Rob Eden and Miss Sally - Peter Smith - Herald Office - J ? (2) upstairs J.G. Burr - bookstore - and P. Smith Dry goods first floor

D- Brick - Whittaker bookstore - Scott B ? Mu? Clothing - Dr. J and DeR- Father lived near and Miss Lizzie Hawthorne

E- Open Space woodshed used by found. - as marble yard - built up

F- Mrs. Sallie Cowan residence - ran to rear Alley - kitchen in rear occupied by Mrs. McIlhenny and children - later Rev. A ? Reperton Jos Wil? Street store - 2 story - many years 3 story brick

G- 3 story brick - store upon dwelling - occupied by David Dickson as store

H - 2 story brick - called "Holmes Corner" - hotel kept by Red -Owen Holmes - father of ? Wife - married one of the 3 Black sisters - before his time Hotel by Mrs. Swain - Geo. R. French - 1st telegraph office - opened in Wil. - store occupied by Jno. G. Bauman - Jas Dickson - Dickson and M. Peake - xx Dan and Ferguson Tailor - Jake Lyon dry goods

I- Lot vacant for long time - later 3 - 1 story brick offices - occupied by Hon. Geo. Davis - Wm. Hall (son John) - Dan Larrington Black Barber -

Alley - ran east from Front Street through to 2nd Street - on the north side of the alley Mrs. Cowan Negro quarters - a garden - school house AP Republic - vacant lot - south side of alley

J - a wooden 1 story house - occupied by Griffith J. McRee - young lawyer - later Phillip Baga? - removed - gate way to

Page 101

Fergusaon and Haines - carpenter shop - in rear - site B&B - machine shop - butting on OG Parsley garden - his residence being at head of alley - 2nd Street -

(J) Daniel Wood grocery - went to California 1849 - occupied by Geo Myers - who bought property - Ronald McDougal (red shirt) - placed 2 story on same - before Myers bought - Caroll and Fennell occupied south half - same store now used by Jno H. Boatwright - Geo Myers by reason ?much ? - by his man in charge - cramped - died and his sons and widow - failed in carrying business on

K- One story wood - Jesse Mulock - Orange NJ - 1st school house - in the 40s later PW Fanning paint store and shop in rear - destroyed by fire - rebuilt - by Polley and Hart - 2 stores - underneath - Wm. Lippert and Buck Wilkins - druggist - Lippert (next door south) from RI - dry goods -fire one night - 8pm - Allen clerk - Express Office 1860/65- Ian Macumber Agent - Jno. Cantwell Agent - Hart and Bailey - Burr and B Burr in succession - overhead - Mozart Hall - occupied and used - concerts - parties, etc- principally Dancing school - John Good - Frensly - 1850/60 - Jas. H. and Leo Chadbourn occupied front rooms of Mozart Hall as sleeping quarters - many years-

L- 2 story wood - Ern? Buck - carriages - later by Isaac Wells - who had repair and paint shop in rear - destroyed by fire - rebuilt - brick 2 story Polly and Hart - (SP Polley - Luis A. Hart) - copper and tin smith - guns and repairs - later Neff - Taylor, etc-

M - wooden small building - occupied by DWE Freeman - Fridge Mallett - Adam Empie - Mrs Boyd(sister) - Henry Gilbert-Baker - N - in rear - house of Hook and Ladder Volunteer - Capt. Jack Lippit - always Captain - until too old

O- Seth Howard - Crockery - boarders up stairs - lived and died - a queer one - when a boy (in early 40's) one cold morning I was trudging along to school Mr. Seth Howard was walking up and down before his shop - his ample cloak folded around him his spare body and stove pipe beaver hat - white ? - as I drew near - I saluted him and said - good morning Mr. Howard -"how do you feel today" - without stopping - he sharply replied - "Dead - Dead - dead for the last 10 years" - many odd things are told of Mr. Seth - around his corner on Dock Street - was a white Mulberry tree - when I frail- the bigger boys would climb and shake the limbs for we little fellows to pick the fruit up - blow off the sand and eat - Mr Seth would come with stones and used to tar the tree trunk to keep boys from climbing- his mortal remains - rest in St. James old ground - towards the south line - Peace to his Soul

P - continuation of same kind of building as O - stuccoed and whitewash - occupied by Bill Kegler - Barber 1st story - 2nd story by his wife Betsy - ? - Bill and Betsy - ginger cake mulattoes - normally free

Page 102

Q- represents a branch or waterway - runs diagonally through the block (No. 1) Comes out ? Market Street - marked ( ~ 0 ~ ) - used in a fire basin or ? and continues - NE coming out of the ground near the present jail (gov) near - 4th and Princess - under Seth Howards old house and so into Dock and is joined by branch from the Old Willow Springs - 2nd Street and so empties into the river at Dock Street

R- woodshed - along North side Dock Street used as warehouse

S- wooden house - Nathan Green (colored) repair and wagon and turning shop -tops - replaced by 3 story brick - Mrs Hat? - Capt Peck - Joe Neff - Doct Midway 1859-

T- Captain Dugall - buried by Wilmington Volunteer- Capt. OG Parsley - late 30's widow married Jno. D. Love - Miss Sarah Peck married Kelly this house - occupied by Capt JF Peck and his wife and kinsmen - G and C Bradley and Miss Grace Mansfield

U- brick house - occupied by Jno Dawson - 1840 - Dr. Jno H. Bellamy - M Pherson?

V- Corner - Dock and 2nd Street (NW)- brick ruins-

W and X - 2- 2 story brick - archway between to rear yard

W- occupied by Mrs. Bishop and daughters - many years - WC Howard - Lt Johnson

X- Robert B. Wood

Y- Residence and garden - OG Parsley Sr.- many years - Mrs. Warren boarder

Z- yard - stables - later by small wooden shacks - for small trading shops

Page 103

Description of Block 2 - Wil. NC

A- Brick house - SW corner Market and Front - Painted yellow - occupied by SM West - merchant - Jim Brocket had watch repair desk - destroyed by fire - rebuilt - communal building -

Tho. Loring paper upstairs - Kahnweiler in store, Mrs Anderson - Mrs. Warren

B- brick - 2 story - TG Fairley - tailor

C- Dr. Wm. L Harris office - died 1839 - succeeded by Dr. Jno.H Bellamy - WH Harriss - the *

represents - Chinaberry tree - Aug Menkel up stairs later - Alley - running to River called Ram Cut (D)- Isaac Gillam - negro "Restaurant - oyster and ?" - Isaac was slave - set free by reason of his rescue of his young Mistress - from burning building - respectable man

E- wooden shed - saw the first passenger coach stored there for use of old W&W RR - Gen. Jas. Owen residence - pulled through street to RR depot - by horses. Robert Long Hardware Store - 1855 (Robert Brown built 2 stores alley to alley)

F- Wm. Destract - Frenchman - Baker and grocer - used to work for Jno. M Cazaux - his clerk - Marsh Greene - ginger cake colored mulatto - carpenter by trade - later worked for W&WRR - lived SW corner (3rd and Nun) after house - occupied by Asa A. Hartsfield - later Tho. Evans - Destract married Miss Lucrannie

G- brick ruins for many years - finally built up with stores

1- occupied by Con. Myers - hatter - Destract - Jno. Gardner

2- occupied - - - - - - - - - Jas. Stevenson

H- 2 story brick - painted roof - Gregory and Cazaux for years - Jesse Mulock moved his school house from directly opposite and occupied as school room - Jno. M Cazaux had occupied building for storage of pea-nuts - long shed in rear- (bowling alley) - AVW Hewlett bought property - 1st floor bar near (10 pin alley rear) - married Miss Jane Whittenbery (Cazamore NY) family lived up stairs Elijah Dickson (Dickson Kidder and Morris) and wife friends with Hewletts - had one son named Dudley - property destroyed by fire - while Hewlett and family were visiting kin (Demmings and Shaw) Fayetteville NC

I- Residence Jno. M Cazaux - wife Zara and son Anthony Dominick (business Baker and grocer) -our 1st stopping place - on arrival at Wilmington NC - May 1836 - from Brooklyn NY by Schooner Charles E Thorn - Capt Sanford- to visit grand uncle Phineas Wines Fanning- GF Wm. younger brother. 2 story - red brick - shingle roof - 1st story store and warehouse - bake house and kitchen in rear - 2 story dwelling - 6 rooms - garret - double piazza in rear - June - cook - Kelly and young Bob - house servants - Bob Sr. - clerk in store - Henry and "Big Organ" John - baker - all slaves and colored- Here we lived until house on Orange Street - was in order and moved. Mrs. Cazaux was Miss Gregory - an exemplary woman and house keeper- everything neat as a pin - Jno. MC - soldier under Napoleon I - French. - Later on Jno. MC died - Toney married Sarah Mullins of Fayetteville - later Mrs. C. died - then Sarah - ADC - living -1906 -

Page 104

Description Block 2 - continued

J- Brick 2 story - Wm. Skipper and Mother - candy makers - old issue - peppermint drops - red and white - stick candies - all flavors - one cent for stick - brass tacks on counter - exact measure of a full stick - to measure for the broken pieces - end and end - sure to get your pennies worth- school boys - bedeviled Wm. having lost an eye - nick named and called him - blowside skipper - 7 seas skipper bug eye skipper - his mother was a kind old soul - I have repented for my mis-doings and am sorry for my days of devilment-

K- Gardner Ellis - he married a Moss - daughter lived at Greenville Sound - later Moonley? and his son Jas. - a printer - on Wilmington Journal - Fulton and P - Lee dollars built on J and K - German Hall and store

L- Brick 2 story - Frost - grocer - upstairs family had 2 sons - school boys - at Mulock - 1st years - fire destroyed I to L - rebuilt

M - Vacant for many years - save small wooden shed - later built up with brick - 2 story - place on Dock Street - marked xxx - was used Christmas holidays by Negroes to strike at turkeys - suspended on pole - opposite side of street - paying a small fee - the striker was blind folder - turned around 3 times given a street pole - 6 feet long - faced the hanging turkey - now walk straight ahead - if he killed the turkey or knock him down "he won" the turkey

N - 3 story brick -Wm. Neff and son - Barzalli and I've - ship stores - many years - Wm. died - Barzalli moved to NY - I met him often 1866/71-1883/1896- ship store - South Street - NY City - Joe was disaffected - 1861/1865 sold out and moved to Florida - later DeRosset and son - had office - 2nd story - river front occupied by Ed. Kidder and sons - Shackelford book keeper - later Jas Dean - loft above (3rd story) - Capt Jack Lippitt - sail maker

O-P-Q- destroyed by fire - in the fire that burnt out Hewlett (H) at same time - replaced by - 2 story brick stores and offices - Anderson and L? Assoc - Jas. Anderson see P-

O- Ike Hutchins - bar - later - ? - later J Neff - bar room and pool

P- store - office overhead Anderson

Q - on this place - Dickinson - Kidder and Morris - office and storeroom big building - in spread - immense sloping roof - Shippers and Comm. - Mackay Hall McKoy - ? Martin - wash Davis - A Martin -From Elijah Dickinson - Ed Kidder - Richard Morris - later dissolved. Up this alley (next) going east - Jno. Smith and Jack Engelhard had a sail loft - before this Ro S Macumber- Jno. G Whittaker (bachelor) occupied office - next to south ? Auctioneer - played the big double bass - in Presbyterian Church - Front Street - when Uncle PW Fanning was Precentor - before "organ" days - tuning fork and pitch pipe - sound C - Rev. WW Ellis - Minister - Harvey ? - SS Supt. - RW Gibbs - my SS teacher -

Page 105

R - Before Hewlett fire - big wooden structure occupied by Brewster and Burr - Brewster - Talcott Burr Sr. - ? room rebuilt - Hewlett Bar and Ten pin alley-

store - Comms - Cronley-Walker and Hall - before 1849 -

store - Mears and Savage - Col Guston Meares - Ern. Savage Freeman

store - Houston - Hall and P Stevenson

Office above McRae and Ballard - open space in front

S- T - years ago - Barry and Bryant - William and Jno. P Calder - Wm Huntington - Albert Adams - Cronley and Morris - all upstairs - Potter and Kidder - Kidder and Martin - Capt Martin - Mickey Morris - Howard and Peden grocer - Cronley and Morris

U - up alley - a man named Miller - kept bar - a good singer

V- upstairs 1861 - Capt Henry M. Drane - A.C. S. - opened Commissary office for NC troops - later Confederates- afforded RR supt. - resigned. Nick W. Schenck - succeeded Capt Drane - as A.C.S and used same office - (1863) - clerk Ch. Haines - Daniel Haines - Jim Lippitt - ? To Fayetteville (? Died yellow fever 1862)

W- corner - Market and River Front - Dudley and Pasley - OG Pasley - 3 stories - destroyed by fire - the falling of the wall - this building crushed the leg- Col Jno.McRae - a cripple for life - occupied many years by H.B. Eilers and Son (Edward)

X- William N. Peden - gentlemens bar - Ishaun (slave) tender. Peden was formerly associated with Paul Sherwood - bar room in Clarendon Hotel - Mrs. Swann - GR French Sr. - m - in - law boarded over head - Burnt out at Dawson fire - as was the block No 1 - The old time gentlemen - who slacked their thirst at this branch (General Lewis H. Marstellar) - many met here - number who never touched a drop - it was the resort to meet every body - such men as Col. Jos. Telfair Miller - Joseph Murphy and others - tea-totalers - Ishaun the colored tender - made the best - cocktail and mint julep or champagne cocktail - that ever delighted human palate and those who rank found ample accommodations at Pedens- seldom any drunkard people those days - no rowdies as- Peden dispensed the best of liquors - as evidence of all tipplers - at his Bar - they drank deep and freely often and often - yet lived to old age - good liquor in those days did not kill - the custom is passing away - bad liquor - preaches the best temperance - let it alone - moderation in all things

Page 106

Description Block No. 2 - continued-

V- stores - 2 stories - can't recall occupant - before the fire - along in this range - John Barker - kept candy store-

Z- Geo. R. French Sr. - shoe store - Samuel ? - book keeper - overhead - 2nd story - Fred Claypole Hill - edited the Wilmington ____________ - Hill sold out and returned - later Jesse Mulock - removed his school to this big upper room - entrance on alley behind Dr. Harriss and Wm Destract outside stairs Isaac Gilliam on opposite side of alley - here Mulock - held forth - until the Odd Fellow School McLaughlin (one leg) - drove him out - Mulock quit went into Merchandising - distributing - Dick Langdon and A.D. Cazaux clerks - abandon this - went to New York and remained rest of his days - with American Bible Society and lived to an old age and departed - many men in Wil.- then boys in his day - owe a debt of thankful gratitude and love for Mulock - care - patience - and earnest efforts for their future welfare - Amen-

Dr. W.W.Ware - Dentist - Orderly Sargent Wil. - had office upstairs - between A and Z - Horace Burr - dry good store - later - somewhere - Y - Antone Morris - Portuguese - Bar and oyster saloon - Capt Tom Marshall (steamer Wil. To C. line) told the story - Antone failed - Marshall asked him "why" - Antone replied in his broken tongue - they (his customers) ete crack and oys - drink my lick - smoke my segard and dem dey say - "charge" - dam - charge - said Antone -

Tom Howle (Malinda Blake) baker F. M Augustine - Fruit - Tho. H. Howey - tailor - Wm. Thompson - watchmaker - Wilmington Club - upstairs (1854/55) - Harry ? Next - east to Pedens - Cigar and Tobacco - Dr. JT ? (bottler) - Iver McCullum - tailor upstairs - later a - Mrs. Warren - Sol Bear - Ike Bear the old market house - run on a level - street sloped at River - front of Market even with street - rear end used for Engine House - Hook and Ladder - One by Ch. Bradley ? - replaced by Ben ?

Page 107

-occupants at time of fire Jan of 1840

No 1 - Jno. Dawson occupied this corner before 1840 - fire destroyed this store - mid-night Jan 1840 - 2 story frame building - hip roof - shingled facing both on Market and Front Streets - this fire destroyed the entire block - save No. 11 corner Front and Princess - there was a suspicion that Dawson knew more of the origin of this fire - than he would tell - insurance 40.000 (hear say) a large amount for those days - (see notes on Jno. D - page ___)

No. 2 - 2 story- frame painted yellow - 1st floor occupied by Gause - lawyer - afterwards removed to Mississippi - upstairs - stair case outside - home of Horace Burr - wife - daughter Mary Anna - boys - Bucklen and Horace - Miss Annie Campbell - she afterwards married Wm. Thompson - 2nd wife - watch maker - burnt out

No. 3 - large double house - 2 stories - double piazza - painted white - occupied by Wm. C. Lord - wife (Hill) - mother and family - Jno Y. Savage - wife - 2 daughters Mrs. Haldridge and 2 daughters - who after married Rev. Crook, SC - O.H. Dudley, Savage children small and refuged - at Bank Cape Fear - across the street - later wooden 2 story - PWF paints - upstairs Dr. W. Ware- Dental room - (1846-49) - now Holmes ?

No. 4 - 2 story duplicate Gause and Burr House - occupied by Yopp - Tailor family - son John - Jack - Alley way - next North - through to 2nd Street south side - yards for stores and dwellings on Market - later Odd Fellows hall above

No. 5 - house and Bakery - Mrs Rankin- later Ben Gardner - Painter and Architect Contractor - Mrs. G - carried on bakery - several daughters - one married Perry- Mrs. Rankin - I suppose was mother - Owen and Robert G - Mary and Laurie - ? Jno. H. Rothwell

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Description Block No. 3 - continued

No. 6 - Clarendon Hotel - brick 2 story - entered on a raise plat form () kind of piazza - 1st floor - U.S. Post Office - C. Dudley P.M. (Father Mrs. A. Martin - Miss & Guilford) - after fire removed Post Office to south side Market - between Front and 2nd Streets -

Postage U.S. - single sheet - from NY to Wil. 25 cts - 2 sheets double amount 50 cts - no envelope or paste - wafer or wax for sealing - prepay ? not demanded

Route to N.O. from N.Y 75 cts - postage as ? - prohibitory - Peden and Sherwood Bar - "Gentleman's Bar" - Wm Peden, Paul Sherwood - upstairs - Mrs. Swann - m - in - law - Geo. R. French - Hotel -

The sound of the Stage Coach horn - still rings in my ears - as the big coach and ? And 4 horses - rolled in - to deliver mail and its passengers - at Clarendon Hotel - 1837 - 1839 - once a day - from the North -

X - An archway and passage between 6x7 - to inside yard of buildings and to residence No. 9 - Peter Harriss - married Morris - sons William M and Charles M (called Catfish Charles)

No. 7 - Annex to No. 6 - occupied by Geo. R. French and one time Jno. R. Reston

No. 8 - open lot - later - Engine House - for the "Franklin" - hand brake power

No. 10 - Mrs. Coxetter- school teacher - many years - entrance Princess Street

No. 11 - old time 2 story brick - hip roof - The Miss ? - opened school there - later Dr. W. Price - office of Wil. paper - Law office - Lucia Holmes - Jno. Baker - Dr. W.W. Lane - drug store (J.S. Burbank clerk) - upstairs Lane's quarters - Dryer - Tailor -Polvogt - ? and others - pull down - about 1898 - for better building

No. 12 - Bernard Baxter - Robert Baxter - sister Mrs. Diggars and 2 dau - later Jas. Ryan - one - the other married in Charleston - Uncle Barney died YF 1862- Jewish and Catholic - later times - Dan O'Conner - Journal office - Fulton and Price and office-

No. 13 - a long row of one story wooden buildings - called "Pigeon row" - later stable - Jno. K. Curry - succeeded by son - on corner

No. 14 - Lot -15 W.C. Wilkins yard and stable - he lived opposite side of street - Alley way through -

No. 16 - One building occupied by Wm. Kellogg - Wheelwright and next door building occupied by Mrs. Gerard and her daughters - think 2 married {Theese Priggir} German

No. 17 - Corner - John Wooster lived near here - possibly on the Carolina Hotel sight - building was put up here - by T.C. and R.B. Wood and for rent

No. 18 - Called Carolina Hotel - advertised lease or sell - March 1841 - The corner 17 - was owned by the McIlhenny's - also extending on 2nd St - North

No. 19 - advertisement - April 1841 - St Johns Lodge - purchased the lot on Front Street - formerly resided upon by Mrs. Eliza Lord - for $1800.00 - alley way between lodge and Hotel-

Page 109

This Mrs. Lord - I take to be the mother of Wm. Lord - and it says "her former residence" - I remember W.C. Lord and family resided on East Side of Front Street before 1840- and was burnt out in the Dawson fire 1840- Meeting one of the daughters of Jno. Y. Savage in New York in 1893 - she told me she remembered this fire - as a child - and they took refuge in Bk of Cape Fear - (across the street) - lived in Isaac house at same time with M.W.C. Lord - I well recall W.C. Lord's mother -

St. Johns old lodge - was near Red Cross Street - in a lot some distance from the line of Front Street - after occupied and known as Jones Hotel before the above date (1838) - the lodge was in building on Orange Street - later residence Tho. W. Brown -

St. Johns Lodge - erected 3 story brick building - at once - 1st story - 2 stores - as offices first - Daniel B. Baker - Dr. F. McRee and son and Dr. Jno. Meares - staircase to hall above and gallery - known as Masonic Hall - large room - Above - ante room and lodge room - for meetings of Blue Lodge -"Knights Templar and Concord Chaplin" - my great uncle P.W. Fanning greatly interested in this work - and had entire charge of Hall and Lodge rooms for many years - My experience for 7 years - with Cha. Blaney (an apprentice to Uncle F.) with trimming Camphor lamps - shifting benches for lecturers and etc - sweeping and dusting - pulling out emblems, etc - for different lodges - "Blue" - "K.T." and "Chaplin" - and keeping things in order generally ought to entitle me to recognition -? by all the Mystic brethren -

Clark - daguerreotype - those days - occupied the Lodge ante room for his office - he was one of the Brethren -

(Uncertain as to who lived No 17 to 26 inclusion before fire 1840 - records on most cases refer to since 1840)

No. 20 - Residence and store - Rob Edens store in this vicinity - after fire log cabin - for Presd camp - 1840 - Harrison and Tyler - erected here barrel hard cider (good vinegar) on top - explosion at night - attempt to blowup Log Cabin - broke glass and scared many - Dr. P told me he thought it an earthquake-later Sam Potter - built 3 story brick house - 2 stores - 1st floor entrance in middle and residence - later son Sam R - who married ? - later Maj. Jno. Walker - Misses Morris - Mrs Quince and others - East store occupied by Pierce and Cushing - Lewis Pierce - bookstore ? West office - Dr. Jno Swann-Honnett-

No. 21 - Joshua G. Wright - Lawyer - residence and office - married Walker - daughter Kate - sons - Julius and Tom-

No. 22 - Dr. Louis J. Poisson - married Davis - son Fred J. - daughter - student Buck Davis - married Cutlar - D.B. Cutlar - later succeeded by Doct Jas. H. Dickson - married "Owen" - students - Bro. Robert - married McLaurin - moved to Laurinburg NC - Wm J. Love - married Hartsfield - living Wil. NC - 1906 - Doct Jas. H - died of Y fever epidemic in 1862 -

No. 23 - Dr. Wm. Berry lived here or owned property - before fire built a house in rear - or back 30 or more feet from street - occupied by Guy C. Hotchkiss- wife - -- in- law - Mrs. Penderford and niece Miss ______ - after wife less ? - all from Connecticut - later front built up

Page 110

Description Block No. 3 - continued

No. 24 - Mrs. Riviera owned this property - 3 story brick after fire- residence upstairs - dau. Sarah - married WS ? - sons - Lewis - Ned -

Miss Joanna Pitts and some of the Pitt boys - later Jas. Cassidy business- Rev. JT Munds - married Ann E. Cassidy - occupied by her as book store - Munds left 4 sons - at one time-

Joe Myer 1st Jew of that class to come to Wil. - opened store - dry goods and clothing - his father - with him - again Wm. And Zeb Latimer - opened their first dry goods store in this vicinity-

No. 25 - G. and C. Brady - (Geo. And Chas) - Connecticut Boots and Shoes - sign Big Boot (Frank Daskin) - went away 1861 - succeeded by Dudley and Ellis

No. 26 - John A. Taylor (NY) - saddlery and harness - Guy A. Hotchkiss (Connecticut) -

John J Conoly - married Anderson -

No. 27 - Tho. W. Brown - Jeweler - Brown and Anderson - J.W.B. - dau. 1st w - Harriett - married Huntington- Kathy - married D.W.W. Harris - sons Marshall - m.- Conn girl - died Australia- Tom W. Jr - married Empie - lawyer and priest - Maine

No. 28 - In rebuilding on old site - after 1840 - made a store here - occupied by Moore house - later Jones and Gardner - later Blancey and Mury - all for sale shoes - later - Sam Groves Northrop ?

Page 111

Description Block No. 4

No. 1 - NE corner Market and Front - "The Old Court House" in street square as the central point of this Town - surveys begin - No 1 - was approached by steps of ton or square timbers - solid - I guess 10x12 - laid up regularly on both streets - almost entire length of both sides of building - being the approach and entrance - to building - No 1 - some 8 feet above street- occupied as office of Doct Armand J. DeRossett Senior - As in those days M.D's were - Apothecary's - as well as Surgeons and Lancers - I recall the long rows of handsome bottles filled with the stuff - to cure or kill - and the Latin names thereon - underneath was a shoe repair - place - Riley the shoe man -Dr. F. Purnell Drug Store - open store and practice Jan 1838- going west - towards the River

No. 2 - Hat store - Thurber Bros - afterwards removed to Mobile - small building

No. 3 - 3 story brick - slanting roof - Wright and Savage - General Store - Dr. Tho. H. Wright - Jno. Y. Savage - There I bought my first school books- Russell Smith's "Arithmetic and Geography" - slate and pencil - I think Jas. G. Burr - waited on me - early 1839 - later Hedrick and Ryan-

Jno. Wooster - Dry Goods - Wm. J. C? clerk - WA Williams - general store - later Community Bank - OG Parsley Pres.- Jim Savage Cashier - Asa K. Walker - clerk and later - change to ? - Jno McRae teller-

Page 112

Block No. 4

No. 4 - SM West and Marble - Hat Store - near here- later Col. Myers - Tho. Smith - boat builder in rear- Jno. Dawson - Dry goods - next door - south hardware- clerks - Horace Burr - Andrew M. Lane (his nephew)- Jim McCallum. Alex McRae- later Dawson, Herring and Teal - succeed by Jno. Dawson - gave up Dry goods - hardware exclusively - 2 stores - finally sold out to "Springers" - Dawson died suddenly and thus follows this episode - how Springer became suddenly rich - $40,000.00 worth of notes marked paid in possession of Springers - they fattened on the carcass-

From No. 5 to No. 12 - Along down the street - Jos. S. Williams - dry goods - he was nephew Wm and Zeb Latimer - married "Martin" - (Silas "brother") - Sam Swann - Ed G. Mears clerks - Asa A. Hartsfield- Jas. Buie - Wild & Anathain (Jews) clothing and dry goods - Peru and Hartsfield - Alex Anderson - Jas. and Edw. (sons) later Jas. Dry Goods and Crockery - Oil, M. Landon - Jno. Reston - Guilford and Dudley - clerks - Armand Young (Jacob Myers, Jew) - store at one time - Chs. W. Bradley - C.B. Miller - Sam Shuter - Kelley and McCalib - A. Lamont and Jacob Lyons on corner (12)

Cannon at corner Market and River Front - north side - in ground - Relic of Revolutionary War 1776-1783

No. 13 and 14 - offices - Jno. Halchaney - later Hathaway and sons - Jas L. Hathaway - Hathaway and Utley - importers Coffee and Molasses-

No. 15 - Peckham - Tim Collins (married Emma Ballard) ship chandler - Wm. Colville - 1858 - later Worth and Daniel - upstairs - Jno. C. Latta - W.B. Flanner - Arch and alley 15 to 16

No. 16 - Brown and DeRossett - offices and warehouse extending up behind alleys AJDR MPB- DeRossett and Brown and Co - AJDR - Jno PRF Brown - Wiggins - Alva (Prince) Burr - book keeper - clerks - W.L. Smith - J.G. Brown - Waddell - 1859-61-(Book keeper N.W. Schenck) Rufus Landon - Jno. McLaurin - W.L. DeRossett - Jno. Wanet - east- (Jno. P. - west)

1866- Armand J (RF Brown out) - Nash - Owen MR. Holmes - Jno Brown ?

No. 17 - Alley to Front Street -

No. 18 - US Customs House - PO and Court Rooms - warehouse in rear - built on pilings - Noyes contractor - brick and brown store - metal roof

No. 19 and No. 20 - store building - Capt. Dugold - later - Petteway and Moore - Williams and ?

No. 21 - Alley way - through - to Front Street

No. 22 - Aaron Lazanus - large building - occupied - 1- Eiler and Mitchell - Mill and feed - BF Mitchell - later sons

2- WP Moore - Jno Stanley - 1856 -

3- Willard and Curtis 1858- Willard - Jno.W. Atkinson 1870-

No. 22 - upstairs - 4 offices - Banks Bro - (Jno and Jas)- and nephew - AD Cauaux - Agent Jonas Smith and Co- New York Packet Line

1854-1860- succeeded by Jas M. Holmes - war put line out-

Line fore and aft schooner - recall captains - Schooner LP Smith - Lee Davis

Schooner RW Brown - Cooper

Schooner AJ DeRossett - Geo. M. Brewster

Schooner Jonas Smith- Nicholas and Tucker

Schooner NW Smith - many vessels come over from Charleston for cargo-dull season

Schooner Smithsonian -

rent for offices - 200 wharf front - 1750 for year - paid quarterly -

No. 22 - occupied by N.W.Schenck - A.C.S. - later 1863 - Capt McKinney as Confederate Commissioned Officer-

No. 23 - warehouse used by Wm H. McRary - 1857-

No. 24 - cross alley to old brick warehouse in rear -

No. 25 - Row 1 story buildings here commenced the fire - Sunday 11 AM May 1844 - which destroyed all the house - stores - sheds and dwellings from Princess Street - North and also building on East part of Front Street and so along this entire street to the River from the wharf up to the W&WRR Depot - continuing for part 3 days - destroying over 600 commercial buildings - the heaviest fire Wil. - have ever known.

No. 26 - Hinton James Esq. lived on this plot - I knew his son Hand - later wooden building - used as carriage repository and by Jno Quince and Cervaux - grocers - Jno. J. Person - Richard Green - clerk - now Davis

No. 27 - EP Hall - later Pres. Bank of the States - sons John - Ed. D. - Eli W. Willis H. -

Masonic Temple

No. 28 - Callardy residence - Briggs Ice Cream and ?Sauce - (Dan McRae building)

~ Alley way to River ~

No. 29 - Bank Cape Fear - Pres. - Jno D. Jones - Jno Hill - Tho. H. Wright and Wm. A. Wright -force - HR Savage - cashier - Junius Gardner - Jas. Brady - Jo McL - Tom Harden - clerical

Later Jno Dawson - Banker-

changed to 1st Nat. Bank - (went under)- EE Burris - AK Walker - Gilbert - (Hanson Bowden - skipped)

Old No. Ca. Bank Law - required cashier to live in Bank - bank and grounds - located between 2 alleys - north and south - Each side-

No. 30 - open space - No. 31 - gardens - also between alleys

No. 32- Uncle P.W. Fannings had paint shop on this ground - wooden shed and extended some distance - west - down the alley line - later new building - offices Adam Empie - Jas T. Miller -

Jno. L. Holmes - upstairs - "Chronicle" - Asa A. Brown - later Talcott Burr - J. Edenton

No. 33 - N Dry (Jew) dry goods store - he was drowned early morning in Cape F. in bathing with Dr. Wm. Ware - about 1847/48 - A McLellan - Scotch - show maker - up stairs-

No. 34 - Phillip Bazadier - Creole Spanish mixed or French- Barber - Fiddler - trumpeter to the NC Horse Guard - red uniform and helmet - parade calls at the street corners when mounted - Happy small boy day

Page 114

Description Block 5

A- Branch Bank of the Cape Fear - NE Corner Princess and Front Streets - 2 story brick with (K) kitchen in rear on Princess Street and (o) cistern near side walk -

Presidents - Alex Anderson - Ed. Hall - Jno Dawson -

cashiers - WE Anderson - resided in bank - married Burgman - 2 daughters and 2 sons -

Geo B - ? War -

Willie E - J. Savage - teller - clerical Jo J Lippitt- Wm. Reston - teller - Smith - teller -

this building - not destroyed in fire May 1844 -

B- B- Major John Walker - injured by fire - never repaired - large grounds - set back from street - large family - married Miss Davis

C-D- Wm. Calder - one of the ? - Wm and JP Calder -(William and Jno Pope brothers) Mr. Wm Calder and son (Wm) were passengers on Sch CE Thorn (May 1835) after he married - Miss Philar - daughter Aaron Lazarus Esq. - children - daughter Thedonia - married Jno L Cantwell - son Robert married Miss Keith - son Wm. married Miss Boatwright - Jno Pope Calder and wife and Mr and Mrs Morris - intimate friends - my wife Mary Eliza was raised for Mrs. Calder and also Mr. Morris raised a son - Jno. P.C. Morris - for Mr C - Mrs. Philar Calder and Mrs. Morris - intimate friends

E - Residence Wm. B. Meares - entire lot from Street to Street - Barn in rear - Am I correct when I write - children - 9 sons and 1 daughter - married Miss Davis - Hon RR Bridgers - bought property PO and Court room - erected by Mr. B - under loan from US and used for many years - later U.S. - bought the entire Meares sight - erected handsome PO - Courtroom and signal office on old house sight - after grading lot to street level -

Note - Wil authorities for many years - have made persistent effort to grade the town - to a level - grading Front Street - the cut in front Meares residence (near 5 feet) - a long law suit - decided in favor Meares and now established - when town grades must put up retaining walls at City expense - TD Meares and OG Parsley (Mayor) came to blows over this matter -

Page 115

F- Dan Dickson - PM - kept Bachelor hall for some years - later - Zimmens Packery- store and residence

G- David Sherwood - residence - ? - 3 boys and 3 girls - Elijah was clerk tp PMWC -

Bettencourt many years - one daughter married Davis - Charleston SC - one daughter married W.William - Mr. Sherwood in poor health many years - stayed home - he paced his long front piazza - morning and evening - tall and slim - black whiskers - always wore dress suit - removed to SC - know his daughter Miss Elvira

All the property on this square (designated as No. 5) much improved and the waste place of 1848 - built up-

The East side of this block - Front street - was destroyed by fire May 1844 - save Bank of the State Building-

Block 6 -

Note - property on this square - entirely destroyed by fire - May 1844 - Sunday - all built since

No 1- formerly garden to A. Anderson - residence (now Bk of New Hanover) -1840/44

No. 2 - residence Anderson - since Orton Hotel

No. 3 - Capt Noyes - (store Johnson since)

No. 4 - Matthew Lawton - cabinet and undertaker- Lumsden

No. 5 - Brick office

No. 6 - Residence Jas. F. McRee Jr. - married "Cervaux"

No. 7 - Rock Spring Hotel

No. 8 - old Rock Spring - by filling up street custom -

Whoever drinks here - return for another draught

No. 9 - 13 - Brick two story stores - various occupants - have rotated in and out - Jas. Malaney - Com - J & D. McRae and Co - Eli Murry - Alex McRae - Davis & McMillian - Joe Russell

No. 14 - 18 - upstairs JJ Lippitt - A.D. Cazaux - Jas M. Stevenson - 1855-1859 - down - Bar room - JH and Lee Chadbourn - M. McInnis - Bear & Brother - Loeb- upstairs - Leo Harris - Harris and Russell - Harding Johnson - Grady

No. 19 - 3 story brick - occupied by Shelton and Mallory - ship and general store - entire building the floor and roof - blown up by P.W. Fanning - chief engineer Fire Department 1844 - by order of fire warden - to arrest the fire - later occupied by Albert Adams 1857 - Anderson and Loeb - Tho Evans and Bloom? - offices on Princess Street - one office by Dr. J.T. Sch? Sr.

No. 20 - Murphy Building - brick house - Star office

No. 21 - residence Geo. W. Davis - later Oscar Parsley - later Jno Dawson - Dawson died in this house

Page 116

Description Block 6 -

A - residence Platt K Dickson (NY) - large ground - daughter m. Cowan & Walker - Mrs. Ome Aunt - destroyed by fire 1844 - replace with expansive mansion - 2nd wife L?

B- Anthony A Manet - French - married Green - daughter Violet Essence - son - Jno V. and Autry - later rebuilt and occupied by Dr. W.E. Freeman - Dr. F. died there - his ward - married John Kurt Brown

C- residence - Gen. Jas. Owen - old time gent - large family girls - President and ? W&W RR - estimable citizen

D - residence Love - GF Dr. WJ Love - (Jno. Nutt's Drug store)

E- residence - Capt Isaac B. Smith - Captain Steamer line - W&W RR to Charleston - dau Julia - married and returned to NO - Sue - Jennie and elder sister - both married Tom Bunting - sons - Elias - William and Ike - school boys at Mulocks in 40s

G-H-I- house built in late years - occupied Kent Brown - Gabe Holmes - Schenck - Brady - Lee Holmes - Vollars

J- Geo and Kelly

K- Sam N. Connor died this house

L- Sam Vick

M - John C. Bowden - inspector - now his widow

N - Residence Robert H. Cowan Sr. fire destroyed residence Sunday May 1844 - his eldest dau Miss Sallie - was to marry Jas. F. McRee - MD - on following Monday or during the week - the fire - together with the Negroes - sailors and mob swept the Marriage Feast and ate up everything - people were glad to do anything for help and saving goods -

{C} - In the Henry Clay Campaign - a large white silk banner - with gold letters -? for speech Henry Clay - displayed from Gen. Owen porch and here speeches of Welcome responses by HC - when on his Tour - PKD (A) entertained Daniel Webster and Ed E?

Page 117

Block No 7 -

Lot No 1 - site of the Horse Pond - low depression and wet and damp grounds here- extending to rear and next lots - Ferguson and Haines - carpenters - built a carpenter shop on stilts some time before 1846 - lot and street filled in - R. Frank Brown - built present house on now there - I was at his dau - Augusta - wedding to Major Taylor 1849 - this house - later owned by Collier - RFB - died April 1865 - Particular good and esteemed friend of mine-

No. 2 - Jas. Sausifar? - free colored - built this house and lived these later owned by Mrs. Dan L Russell - widow and residence

No. 3 - Methodist Church (wooden meeting house) then called - stood on Corner above - site now of Sprint and Co - destroyed by fire 1844 - The Methodist - on site No 3 - built a big wooden shed and called it - Tabernacle - Rev. Whitford Smith - preacher - Good

No 4 and 5 - garden and house on same - owned by O'Neal - occupied by Jno. C Good- (my cousin) (1832-?)

Slight recollection as to balance this square - some small house

Page 118

Block No. 8

A- on this ground - was a large wooden building- with galleries - called and known as the Methodist Meeting House - burned 1844. Rebuilt by general subscription - of brick - under efforts of Rev Whitford Smith - whites occupied floor seats - galleries by slaves - Billy Merrick - the 1st (2 Billies after) and Jack Cameron leaders of the Negro worshipers - in song - music and shouting-

Destroyed by fire and new church on Grace Street-

B- Grant Bros - built wooden store - groceries and general supplies-

C- Saint Johns Lodge - I was at a big dinner given here in the 40s - Jno Banks caterer - Afterwards - became "Jones Hotel" - is accommodate the left was travel by rail and boat - those days no upper or western routes - Parker - clerk

D- Hon George Davis - lived on this square - many years - I recall he graduated - Chapel Hill 1838 - The Valedictorian of the day - sons Junius- Lewis - daughter Emilie - married Crow- Metta - Roundtree - Isabel Sholier by 1st wife Miss Pope - 2nd wife daughter Carey - married McRae - Fairfax m ?G

Methodist Parsonage on this square - many years - F - I think - also residence - Virginia Marstellar Bunting - Jno Baker (son daughter) 1st years of married life

Crossing Red Cross Street - wooden bridge to RR warehouse and office - trains started from top of the hill (as in 1905) - note the following notice advertise - 1838 "The Locomotive and train

will leave the depot at Wilmington everyday - (except Sunday and Tuesday) - precisely at

11 o'clock AM"

The wooden bridge spanned a deep ravine - sort of creek or water course

Mon. Luciani (French) had candy store and residence about way across bridge eastside -

Page 119

Block No. 9

Along in day 1838-42

A - long elevated trestle with track 30-50 feet above street - built by W&W RR- to deliver prime wood for the 4 steamers - route to Charleston SC - 1st steamer - Boston - Capt Ivy - charted - used North side Market Dock as landing - until RR whs. built

Steamer North Carolina - built by Corn Vanderbilt - put on the line- "Halifax-Wil-Charleston" by W&WRR Co - Dec 1837 -

Steamer L? Dudley - arrive Aug 1838 - placed on line

Steamer C. Vanderbilt -

Steamer Wilmington

All (except Boston) were bought by the W&W RR

B - Jno. A. Taylor- Agent for boats - supplies - office and warehouse - later Jas. T. Miller - (YYY) - graded since tracks Atlantic Coast Line

E - Branch from high sand hills and covering to river - later used as track for highlands back to river front - E - wooden bridge 1- Luciani shop

C- Henry Nutt Still yard

D- Nutts office

G- stone wall, ascent to Front Street - XXX- open space - later Freight sheds

H- Bennett Flanner Still and yard

I - Flanners residence

J - Sam Berry

K- small shops and houses

N - Harrison Mill

L - timber pen - now filled in

Page 120

M - Hall and Armstrong - (Ed P Hall and Tho J. Armstrong) - Iron still and N/S yard - here tis said big fire 1844 destroyed many thousands barrels - virgin - dip and scrap turpentine-

O and P - residences Capt Tho Guitier And Rev. Jesse Jennett - on high sand hill-

Edward B. Dudley - native of Onslow - New Hanover claimed him - 1st Gov of NC - elected by Popular Vote - served two terms - at same time (about 1837 or 8) citizens gave a "Barbecue" at Hoggs Folley (somewhere near present site SAL Depot)- Hoggs Folley - Looked to me as a made road through a swamp - high ground to the east - swamp and small oaks to the east - road ran

N & S - beautiful shade - a large spring - in the hill side at the North turn - Down this Avenue - were set - long rough board tables and from these board served barbecued - ox - etc - Uncle P.W.F.

took me as a small boy and I recollect leaving Front Street near the intersection of Red Cross and going over the water - creek and swamp below - on a high single board wide elevated walk - until we reach dry ground beyond - as I recall - this board levitated set up on props _________

must have been several hundred feet long - then some distance beyond the Lily Pond (to the right) Pond Lilys - Bella Allen and daughters later lived in a house in front of the pond - I remember at about W - (as marked on map) the steamer Henrietta (oldest steamer in US) Capt Doyle O'Hanlon - was then beached at high water - for calking and repairs to bottom - too early for ships rail ways (later Jas Cassidy installed at his yard)

Page 121

A- Boarding House - Mrs. Smith -

B- Tho C. Miller - Mrs. Lewis H. Pierce - Jno Dawson - Cape Fear Club

C - Gov. Jno. Owen - Miss Ellen who married HW Gwinn

T & C Miller - office S.A. Line - RR -

D- Chimneys - Wm Carson's house - fire 1844 - since rebuilt Hall of Elks

E- Sternberger - Bar

F-G-H stores and offices - formerly Jas. I. Bryan - P.O. Reilly (bar)- Clark and Turlington -

D. Cashwell (1852) - Russell and Keith - H & J Russell

vicinity Southart and Wallace - Heyer and Van Glahan - EJ ? - Ava Hall - Parchau - D. Lambert (1859)- Eli Murry, Thompson Murry

I- Street corner - entrance on W and South- when Jno S. Bauman removed from under Holmes Hotel SE Corner - Market and Front - he removed to place marked (I) -Groceries and retailed.

Matthew Vassar Cream Ale - (1849) Brewery - Pokeepsie - North River on Hudson R - 5 cents for tumbler - full size - drawn from this word - See Result - (in 1905) - M. Vassar work, economy and beneficiary "Vassar College" "Vassar Home for Old Men" - Pokeepsie NY - I met Mr. Vassar - in my visits to Pokeepsie 1849 and later and visited his grounds long before Vassar College was conceived and while Mr. Vassar - was making his Famous Ale - beyond the North Dock - A small spare man - "Big Soul"

K- AA Moffett - naval stores - clerk Jno. M Lawson - Owen Fennell - Chauny Southerland

L- my earliest recollection of Benj. F. Mitchell Shop of General Supplies at L - one story wood - land on square O - open no buildings

Page 122

1st formerly open space and wharf - now Springer's Wood and Coal Yard

2- years ago 1 story (red) store wood - occupied by Jacob Wessell. Wessel and Eilers- Grocery and Whisky

No. 3 - small slip convenient place for River water - "take 3 bbl Walters - 19/21 cent Whiskey" - 1838/48 and with add Cape Fear water - make 5 bbls - sell to Raftman and up river merchants 21/24 cents - Result = Riches

3- Jn SW Atkinson - 2 story brick offices - occupied at times Jno. Cantwell - AHVB - Roger Moore - Moore and Rankin - Exchayerism Chadbourn - Harris and Howell - Barker and Riley upstairs

4- long 1 story AHVB and H&H -

No. 5 - 2 story brick - stair case outside North Navassa Guano Office - Ed Kidder - Geo. Kidder

1st floor WH McRary & Co 1856 - Com. Cotton Exchange - next door - AHVB - Jno E.Crow -

Jno T. Rankin - offices

Page 123

Page 124

Description

1 - Barney Baxter and Bro. Bob- Grocery - SE Corner - Dock and Water Street - kept supplies for Pilots generally- Irish- Catholics - good citizens - bachelors both - Barney died Y. Fever epidemic 1862 - at home on Princess St.

2 - Next South - "Pilot House" - "Jack Bishop" - Bar and Meals and rooms - table ? - everything to eat - in large supply - good cooking - oysters and Rice birds in season - "Bishop liberal and genial host" - next alley way to Front Street and large vacant lot - owned by Major John Walker - at one time wooden building

3- occupied by WO Jeffreys - who married sister Jas. McGary - Uncle Johnny Banks - AE Keith - later by Oscar Parsley - as coal and wood yard - Maj Jno Walker - never improved any of his property - by building stores - houses - residences and leased the vacant land - tenants to erect houses - son Alvin - administered his Father's estate - Alvin's leased to Oscar Parsley for a time - the big lot (No 3) - Oscar erected small office - coal bins and train way for unloading coal- when lease was about to expire - Alvin notified Oscar - He should raise the rent - It was a goodly ? - Oscar found he could do better - Alvin was obstinate - Oscar asked me to interview Alvin - Alvin would listen to nothing - not even a compromise rise - I forewarned him (Alvin) it was better to be sure of ($1000) per year - a big rent for a vacant lot - than take chances - No and No said Alvin - Oscar moved to the corner lot near Orange - at less rent - Alvin's lot - was vacant for many years - so we go and learn

4- Jno. Maloskey - sailor runner and lodgings - enlisted in Capt ED Hall Co - 1861 - after keeper Orton Light -US -

5- Miss Sallie Smith - 2 story white stuccoed house - 1st floor warehouse - upstairs - Henry R. Savage office - SS Mill - No. 5 directly across Cape Fear on Eagles Island - Mr. Savage afterward - because cashier Bank of Cape Fear held office till he died - a good friend of mine - offered me at 2 distinct times - a clerkship in Bank CF - Discount Clerk held by Harden - Book Keeper held by Jo McLaurin - an estimable gentleman -

6- around corner - going east "Van Bokkelen" "A.P. Repeton", Jno. E. Lippitt at various dates - Ice warehouse - brick kitchen on corner - occupied by blacks-

Page 125

7- Large lot - crossing a wide alley - and set back from line of street- River front- large storeroom-warehouse and offices upstairs - Robert W. Brown, Esq - ample room and disconnected from any building - conducted a large business - at different times had associated in business his son - Jno. Potts B. - after Brown and DeR - Robert G. Rankin- and later R. Franklin Brown- well known as Frank Brown - Geo Jos Murphy - book keeper - at one time - George Harriss and Jos. H. Flanner - as boys - served as clerks -

Mr. Brown lived on Front Street - sons Jno Potts - who married a Miss Potter - Frank - married Mrs Nelson - nee McRae-daughter - Columbia - married Fred J. Lord - Jessie - married - Dr. Sam Frink - I knew all these - RWB - courtly gentle - excellent man - Mina his cook - Bob - servant - (slaves) - served him faithfully -

on the west side of his store lot - Front Street - opposite Presbyterian Church - was a fine row of cider trees - this lot afterwards site of present Market House - passed to heirs - R. Franklin Brown and then - Jno E. Lippitt -Adm. - and Brown children - Worth and ? Occupied Brown store and office - many years - my good friend Alex Sprunt - was book keeper -

8 - Engine House of "Fire Brig" - Negro firemen - House Tower erected - hand brake power and suction

9 - Negro house

10- Cooper Shop - Jethro Thane and Bro - Spint T. Carks - later A. Morgan - went to ? - later a man who married one of Sergeants dau and removed his shop - near VanB still - Later A Darby

11- known in the old days as Jenkins Tan yard - fire burnt out his shed May 1859 - about 3 PM - strong SW winds and increased and spark set fire to Presbyterian Church - wooden steeple (brick structure and destroyed some buildings Orange , in few hours - great fear of a wide conflagration - at time - I was boarding - in the Joe Hill house - corner SE Front and Dock - 2nd SE Room - everybody in the neighborhood moved out - I would not allow my things moved - Griswold a music teacher and with help - my negro stewards -"Abram Davis" -"Fred Williams" - "Frank and Sol Mott" - with blankets- water and brooms - saved the house - Charlie Morris and helpers saved kitchen - no aid from Engines - it rained fire - whole shingles and sparks - Jas. S. Wright, Esq. congratulated me on noble work of our saving the Joe Hill house - for if that had gone - he said he looked for a fire - sweeping the town- North East-

Page 126

Jenkins yard - later - Robinson and King Office later power house - Street and Electric Car Line-

13- open space for storage of N/stores

At 14 - a small slip came across the street - and into yard (13) for rolling out tar and turpentine from water - this was spanned by a small bridge on the street - for foot - dray and horse passage - now filled in - before 1900

15 - now facing River - in front RW Brown - office and storeroom - a new wharf - built by Larry Jones (colored) and named by Mr. Brown - as "Fillmore Wharf" - he was Agent for some time for Jonas Smith and Co - NY packets and this wharf was for discharge of cargo (RF Brown clerk)- Ocean Steamer for Coastwise use - was still in the dim future - the "sloop" - the "fore and after" - the "brig" and "Schooners" - the carriers of that day and generation

Going back to (16) on Dock Street - warehouses East "Baxter" - south side of Dock - lower floor Com. stores - upstairs "Head Quarters" Department NC - Confederate States - Gen Gallen - French - Whiting Etc - Q.M Officers - Capt CW Styron - Capt Jas B. Huggins - AQM - paymaster etc-

17- Chapel Sailor House - Capt Gilbert Potter - erected this building for Christian service -

18 - known as a "Commercial Hotel" - (upstairs 2nd and 3rd) Wm Beach - married Harvey - in parlor of this house(40's?) - my first sight of the "Siamese Twins" (Ching & Eng) under PT Barnum management - admission 25cts - later Seaman Home - Williams during War (1864/65) - Hospital No. 5 - Drs. BF Fissard- Sam Wright

19 - Corner store - facing both Dock and Front - Peter Ross and his faithful maid Sarah - Ross a foreigner - store

20 - office Dr. Wm A Berry - dirty and dingy - Alley was next south - through to River front

21- House - Trask and household - later Jas. F. Brockett and family - later shop

22- Hanke Vollars (the Negro called him Mr. Hanke) - German - beginnings of future fortune - Grocers - dummy boxes - Negro trade- Sounders - whiskey - slippers - herrings - crackers - cheese and counter -"save all - spend more" - rich in first years (later Adrian and Vollars)-"Alderman" "Bank Director" residence of Dr. AJ DeR mansion - up the ladder - good citizen as all our Hanoverian Germans proved to be-

Page 127

A - cross Orange Street and now along west side of Front - to A - many years old brick ruins - Eccles Estate -RWB manager - Negro quarters in yard - Boys to go there to "chunk" -locust when ripe - later built up - occupied by Ben Hallett - Peter Mallert - RF Brown - John T. Rankin and others - houses flush on street

B- one and half story wood - occupied by Antone Morris (Portuguese) and his maid Nellie (colored) Cauzaux - later Antone ? and Negroes and last PW Fannings "curiosity shop" and storage for ? trunk - destroyed by fire - total loss to PWF - house ?

C- Sailor boarding house and entertainment - Madame Mary Cruse (Creole) - sign of "Welcome" over the outer door and sign emblem - "American and English flags" crossed - motto -

"Now we meet again" -

Dance house - grog - What you don't see call for - Mary had several daughters - one married - Jas F. Brockett - Brockett Watch maker - mail carrier - horse judge - good citizen - another married a sailor named Price (hard case) - his daughter married I think Charlie McClanny (brick mason) - one with W. McIntyre - another with "Chambers" - first engineer to make the through run - on completion and celebration of completion - W&W RR - McIntyre and Chambers both left W so to their women remarried - "sic transit" -

Mary Cruse claimed to be French Creole - dark yellow - straight hair - she was better than her trade - honest and good behavior-

D- house erected since-

E- Wm G. Fowler - married one of "Johnson girl" - good citizen and kind man - good worldly shape - 'tis fortunate in wife's family connections - Fowler pulled hauling and cargo wheels for ships - stable in rear - along back this square - sheds tar and rosin - on wharf - There is a drain - through "old 76" lot - coming out Tan Yard bottom and crosses Front Street - near Mary Cruse' lot and so into River - the portion of Front St - from Eccles corner to Fowler - chiefly near Mary Cruse house - was very low and damp and had been filled in say 10 to 20 feet - to redeem ground - also hill from RWB house - cut down and this made Ann Street - accessible from river - before too steep for wagons

Page 128

No. 1 - Jno Polls Brown - house removed back - Fred. J. Lord built new house or repaired old and lived there many years

No. 2 - Residence RW Brown - Mrs. Lord - Van Bokkelen - during War 1861/65 occupied EA Keith officers Jno. Winder - Hawk

No. 3 - Sunset Hill - high sand hill

No. 4 - Negro house and tree - later houses Henry McQueen

No. 5- Street ends her in steep bluff

No. 6 - Residence Gov. Ed. B. Dudley many years - DJB Everette (1858) before him Frank Brown - Jno. Cowan - later James Kerchner - remodeled Jas. Sprunt

No. 7 - Jas. Cassidy - occupied half the square - high ground garden on Front Street

No. 8 - office in old brick ruins

No. 9 - Rail way for vessels

No. 10 - residence opposite Cassidy - Lewis - JM Cazaux died this house - ADG and Martha - Darby's - fine oaks in front

No. 11 - Walker Morris

No. 12 - Mrs. Morris and son Jas. T and grandson Walker on back street from No. 11

No. 13 - Rhoda Gates

No. 14 - Main Top Smith

No. 15 - Sergeant Branch and house near (x) at foot of hill

No. 16 - Palo Alto house

No. 17 - Tabby Light - Jane Craig - on top of hill - down the hill to bridge over (18) Dudley's Pond and outlet and dam - iron pipes 19 - for water supplies for SS Mills on River Front

No. 20 - Rouse - constable on hill and east of Dudley's Pond

(13 - 14 - 16 - 17) - an off shade of respectability - bad refute and hence this section of town -

B.A.D.

Page 129

No. 21 - Aaron Lazarus Steam Saw Mill - Jno. A Taylor - Isaac Northrop - Sam and Harris - N and Wm Cummings

No. 22 - Madam Balinda Blake - Tom Howle - those who lived (1840-1860) know - let the curtain fall. Madam was converted and baptized by Rev. A. Paul Repeton - removed to Raleigh NC - hopes of a new life -

No. 23 - Called Baptizing Dock - swimming place for boys

No. 24 - Black Smith Shop and Machining - Wm Sutton - HY Taws - Tom Southward - ships work

wharves from foot Ann to Cassidy's - used for N/S yard and storage - no approach to river by Nunn and Church Street - high bluffs-

xxx- at this dock was built a Confederate Iron clad (1863-1864) Capt Jas. Whitehouse - Captain of Navy-

Beyond Northrop Mill - open space to -

A- Clarendon Iron Works - abandoned

B- AH Van Bokkelen still and shed and yard N/S - Fred Rhue - Foreman (1846/86)

4 - Wil Cotton Mill

5 - Rice Mill - Sam Potter - Ab. Wade (Miller) ? - destroyed by fire early morning /40s - never rebuilt

6- Jno. Wooster - still and yard N/Stores

7- SS. Mill EB Dudley - Parsley- W. Dickinson

8 - House in Oak Grove - occupied by Rich. Bradley and later Tho. F. Gause - Thurston and other mill employees-

9 - SS Mill and Planing Gilbert Potter - Potter & Kidder - Kidder & Martin - Edw. Kidder - EK and sons (Geo. Kidder - 1905)

10- Timber pens - in front of westside of Mills - lumber yards

11- Canal

12 - Rice field and swamp

13 - Green Mill -? - Eleares field to east - on main road south - to left ruins of old Green house and beyond Greenfield Pond - changed ? McIlhenny - I have seen this pond froze over in winter and skated - RB Wood - Frank Brown - HR Savage-

Page 130

Referring to No. 1 - my first recollection of this ground - afterwards sight of Mrs. Joe Hill's for boarders - A one story - long brick building used as a black smith shop by Stephen D. Wallace Father - open drain through yard - (toward river) from Willow Spring on 2nd Street - later Dr. Jno Hill (not Jno. H. Hill MD) erected this 2 story house - upon a one story brick basement or 1st floor - even with street - entrance to house 2nd story - by circular step north side - Mrs. Hill married 2nd time - Mr. _______ removed to Conn and for good and all. Her faithful man slvae "John" - I seen in NY 1880 - was Bank Collector - Mrs. Hill gave him freedom - occupied later by Dr. Fred. J. Swann and family - dau Sallie and sons Dr. Jno - Fred - Jas - Sam - Willie - they took boarders -

(later board) - in 1859 Richard Morris - I heard Pres. Jas. K. Polk (1849) speak from the porch of this house - in response to welcome by Wm Hill - demonstration by citizens - Ex- Pres Polk en route to his home - in Tenn.

47 - Capt. Nathan Brickhouse and father in law (Dixie)

Capt Brickhouse - "old salt"- ashore as dray man and mill man-

48 - Louis P. French - lived on next big lot - daughter Mary Ann - married Sam Frank and moved to sound

49 - Store - later on corner

50 - Negro shanties - scrub oak - dog fernal sand and wire grass - woods and bushes

Page 131

1- NE corner of Dock and Front built by Dr. Jno. Hill - boarding Mrs. Joe Hill - Ford - Morris - FI Swann - Store Adrian and Vollars before office Doct. ?

2 - Lewis Lane - Peter Walker - ED Hall - married daughter Lane - this house - Mrs. ? Burr - JG Burr - married her - ? Jno Hill- Mrs. Hill

3 - Bradleys and Jewetts

4- alley to 2nd Street

5 - Presbyterian Church burnt May 1859

6 - Lesson room in rear

7 - Mrs. Sara Lillington - Mrs. M Walters

8 - Jno. Banks

9 - H. Law ? - later Jno Dawson house

10 - I Northrop (4 -alley)

11- Dr. WI Harriss

12 - ? and Jewett

13 - Horace Burr

14 - Mrs. Dunliffen

15 - GW Davis - Dr. Anderson

16 - Peter Carn. Colored

17- '76 said to be built by Gregory - Mrs. Prescott - sailor - Mrs. Warner Hotel

18 - store

19 - Jno Dawson Hariss

20 - Julia Rivera Min ? - Tan Yard bottom

21- Mrs. Wm. Cook Miss Cowan

22 - Harvey ? - Geo Myers - Dr. F

23 - St Johns Lodge - TW Brown

24 - short alley

25 - Jas. Anderson built by Sol. Nash

26 - House

27 - Dr. Anderson Office

27 - Baptist church removed to corner Market and 5th (old Circus lot)

28 - Capt. Huntington - Geo. Ferguson - Berry Dr. Sch?

29 - Mrs. Green Daniel

30 - Wm Purnell - Adam Empire

31- Chris Dudley - Chadbourne

32 - since built - Draper

33 - Rich. Morris (1852)

34 - all vacant (1860) since built on

35 - Jno. A. Parker - Tom Evans - CE Robinson

36 - Parker - WR Kenan

37 - Sally Burnet - negro

38 - Henry P. Russell - Barlow - Cazaux - NW Schenck 1862/64 - house burned 1864

39 - Capt. Chas. D. Ellis - burned Nov. 1864

40 - Eph Westcott - Mrs. Cowan and Mrs. Green

41 - PW Fanning 1850-53

42 - Ezra Wood 1848-49

43 - Dutchman shop

44 - Nat Fowler - son John

45 - Henry Dudley 1850 - Geo. Houston 1862 - Davis S. North

46 - Capt. Jas. Whitehead 1860 - James and Eliza Daggett

Page 132

A- Ben Berry - Cummings

B - Geo. Cofer - Bakery and home

C - Wash Green - Hartsfield - Thom. Evans

D - Walker Mears

E - Solomon Moore

F - Turner - PWF - JC Wood - NW Schenck

G - Bell

H - Miss Brown

I - House

J - DW Wood 1848 - Hawthorne - Schenck

K - Geo. Ferguson 1847

L - Henry S. Haines 1847

M - Toomer

N - L.F. Burr

1 - J.W. Player

2 - Old wooden house

3 - small houses - down grade to Sergeant's Branch - bushes and under growths

V - Boiling Spring on edge of ravine - to east from road

Highland hills - up the road going South - quite an elevated plateaux - bushes - sand and grass - chinquapin and berry bushes

W - 2 story wooden house on high ground - occupied at one time by Duke Walker (colored) - this portion - outer limits of town to southern and toward east - high ground and overlooks River (Cape Fear) - Brunswick County - Mills - toward west and north west - good view of city

Page 133

A - old brick ruins - English called Williams Castle - dilapidated - occupied by poor people -

Wm Sorbett - kept Negro School in 1st story and Uncle PWF sent - 8 apprentice boys - I went some times with the boys - Sorbett - tall fine frame and face - white hair - big white crescent

B and C - small wooden houses - belonged to Fergus - D Buie and Mrs. W

D- in rear Jane lived

Charlie King built on corner

E - Gov Dudley -Mrs Cowan - Buck Gause - Hall McKoy

xx - house since - Brad Jewett

(E) - Dan'l Fergus Sam P Gause - ? Gause

F- one story wood - high piazzas - Tom Harden RB Wood - drive

G- Col. Jno McRae - married - son Walter (Sparrow) - daughter Caroline married _________

Mag married Gurganous - Sally married Chatir

CC- Howe - house and garden

2 - since corner house

IAS - IA Sinclair

Miller - I and T Miller and Mrs. Harris

3 - house

(1) - Tar yard works and ? - since street filled in

(3) - house on corner - Radcliffe Evans

4 - Jno. T. Hewett - moved Jumping Run

5 - 6 - deep ravines - houses built - Parsley -? - Waddell

7 - Green School house

8 - D. Baldwin - Miss Northup

9 and 10 - Latimers - on corner ? Wallace

11 - Sutton

12 - Deal

13 - Rev. BL Hoskins

14 - alley - down alley Wm. Busch - Miss ?

(14) PW Fanning - 1837/54

15 - Kelly of Kelly and McGraft

N - open lot Miss Waddell School - Mrs. Gardner Ellis

M - Henry Sampson - Wheelwright - Catholic Church

0 - Gilbert Pollen Stable

P - Morris-Williams - later SP Polly - Geo. Myers - Dan Russell

Q - Alley through

R - WH Lippitt - Burris - DeRossett

S- Jno. Williams - WAN Lippitt

T - High sand hill occupied 2 lots - negro houses - Mollie Swann - Nancy Quinor - since Jethro Ballard - Wm Potter - Ackinson - D. Bellamy

U- JC and RB Wood stable and fancy cow and wood shed - since with

ZZ - Latimers

TS - Tim. Savage - Waddell - Jones - Bacon

X - Ed Savage - Henry

V - Jno. K. Dix - Bond

A- Hall and Armstrong - Jas. W. Johnson -Higgins - offices up stairs-

B - Wm.C. Lord - Mrs. Lord

C - Silas N. Martin - Cazaux

E - office Dr Anderson - Wright - Mears and Dr. ?

D- Tho. H. Wright - Wm. McRary - Lord Cornwallis H. Qr. - 1782

E - Wallace

F - Sam. Shuter - Jno ? - Boatwright

G - Old Circus ground - open field - Residence Dr. AJDR - Vollers

H - Tower - Town Bell

I- J- K- residences - RG Rankin - Langdon - Ned Russell - Guy Hotchkiss - Destrach - Leamans Bakery

L- residence - EP Hall - Mrs. Beach, Miss Marks

M - stores and offices - Mrs. Jewett School - dental office - Simpson-

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A - Tomb of Cornelius Harnett

1 - Old St. James Church - formerly located building as street - burying ground - in old days walking the side walk - straight east - carried you into the church - torn down by order Church Committee - (TH Wright - WC Lord)

2 - wooden 1 story - called sessions room - built for meeting - S/S and day school by St. James - at one time Court was held - "Solomon Tates" - a half breed - was here tried for murder and acquitted - Polls - held here - lectures and concerts - late years School - Miss Hetty James and Miss Kate Burr

3 - St James (PE) built - JC and RB Wood

4 - WA Wright Esq. - married Hill - daughter - Claypool - married Mears - Callie - Florence married Potter - 2nd Atkinson - Jos. H - Wm Aug - married Lee Holmes -

Rev. Wooten - married Yonge Jewett

5 - large lot

6 - house Don McRae Jr. -

7 - Jno. A. Taylor built Vault above ground - when near completion - blown up by powder

about 9 PM - abandoned (Who?)

8 - town burying ground

9 - St. James burying ground - filled with graves of the older people - closed -

many bodies removed to Oakdale

1- Gabriel Holmes - stable - East end Negro burial ground - Ed Kidder residence built by Geo. Ferguson and additions Lot to 4th St.

2- 3 - field x - Prince Labou (Nichols) 1840 - Negro lived at x - sons Dan Carpenter - David and Babery - respectable Later residence - Jas. Chadbourne - Levi A. Hart - xx Williams Alley -

4 - 1850 garden attached to House 5 - grounds of Presbyterian Church - Chadborn ? And house

5 - residence - Rich. Bradley - Jno. C. Ward - Duncan Moore - TF Peck - AH Van Bokkelen -

rest of square open - since improved

B to C - sawdust walk - dotted line - so across 4th Street to ? McRae - for pedestrians and to avoid sand

(C) - along 4th Street - no house 1845 - since improved

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1 - Capt. Hartman 1838- CW Fanning - Wm Hartman - Clayton Giles

2 - Wm B. Giles 1840 - Wm. Yonge - RB Wood - OP Mears - D. Burbank

3 - Neil McLaurin (1844) - Jos. Murphy - Mike Cronley

4 - Later - Bailey put up residence

5 - Kelley (father Geo. And Oliver) - Abram Baker married Ward - Alergo Ward - T and S Haines - Rob Houston - on this lot - Abram Baker - brother Daniel B - whipped his slave result death -

I remember standing at window - house Uncle Phin - Orange St and seeing Sherif I. Fennell - taking Baker to jail - suspicious death of Baker

6 - Mrs. Hendrick - daughter Martha married TH Harvey - son John J - married Berry - Hendrick and Ryan- Col. Conf ?

7-8- rear gardens - McLaurin and Giles - no houses

9 - Iver McCallum 1840- sons Arch and Jas

10 - 1840 Mrs. Russell - son Charles - Joe - Henry - daughter Lizzie

(all the houses on this square 1840)

xxx deep ravine - extending into Tan yard - west side of 3rd Street - since filled in

xxxx - Negro houses -

ooo - up alley Henry Sampson (colored) fiddler and wheelwright - shop at right Catholic Church - Dock Street

* well in street

AA - Nathan Green - colored - wheelwright - shop in Dock Street - later residence JH Neff

B- house built by PW Fanning - sold to ? - since Burr (Burr and Bailey) - residence Rev. Pritchard - died here Y.F. 1862

C - Hilsey - colored - copper smith - rest of square vacant 1840 - since many buildings

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1 - Vacant lot - this corner

2 - Leamans put up store later - and his son had store and sold bread -

3 - Mrs. Burnett - house back from street - sons - Dick (or Richard) - Henry - Jas - large garden front and rear to next street (4th)

x- Negro cabin - Mulberry trees - at Mrs. Burnett - attracted "We Boys"

5 - Jas. Stoakley - on corner Jas. Shackelford house at 6 - later Jno.W. Atkinson - Stevenson

and others

xx- Big Oak - 4th Street - in street - east from Mrs. Burnett - at this tree - Nick Robinson - killed Negro named Merrick - a big oak tree is on Third x x - Robinson tied and branded right hand

( ) guilty man - slaughter (old Court House - corner) intersection Market and Front by sheriff Fennell - as a boy was there and heard Robinson repeat - "God Save the State" - in open court - Judge reprimanded Jury and Robinson counsel - said "Robinson should have been hung - foul and brutal murder" - But the times - then! - What Jury would hang a white man for killing a Negro?

(In antebellum days) - Robinson was a Desperado - finally ran away and rest of square vacant for horses - later years across street from this tree ^^^ "Keatie" - a young white man - killed a kinsman - penalty 10 years

Continuing South along 3rd Street - left hand side house - Anthony - Fred and Pompey Howe - carpenters ? free slaves - WCB - sand hill down grade - cross continuation "Sergeant Branch" -Swamp and woods and bushes - ascend rising ground - high open plateau -so continuing on - the woods to Greenfield Pond -

Page 137

1 - open lot - Jewish Synagogue

2 - Miss Langdren - Armand Young - TD Meares

3- Alfred Martin - Maffett

4 - Mrs Robinson - Lady R - JJ Conley - WS Anderson - store

7 - Richard Morris - LH Marstellar - Williams

8 - Miles Costin - Col Atkinson

9 - Geo Sloan - Dr. Baldwin

10 - BF Mitchell

11 - Tom Holden

12 - Geo R. French -

13 - Mrs. Jones - Huggins

14 - Alvin Walker

15 - Jim Colhandy shop

x - ?

16 - Rectory St. Paul's

(7) - Miss Hannah Bowler

18 - Sam P Gause

20 - HB Eiler

21 - French brick tenament - DKMR - Northup ?

22 - Thunder and Lightening house - Miss Polly Moore - in the /40s - whole square open - dog fennel and scrubby oaks - diagonal? to McRae and Green houses

23 - DWW Haines - along 5th Street - west side - A Mindel - J. K.Williams -Arthur Holmes -

GR Harris - Mrs. Whitaker on corner - all in later years

24 - JB ? - Tom Jane ? - ? Coney - Ben Callais

o- Mulberry trees

25 - Rich. Owen Holmes - Dr. J ? died of Y. F. 1862

26 - Gen. Alex McRae - sons Archie - Jno - Alex - Don - Henry - Robert B. Williams - Walter - Cousin ? and grandmother - Hd. Ins. For Boys 1839/58 - moved to Love Grove

ll ll- houses since

27 - Wm. Peden and large grounds

x - Catholic School rear

A - 2 story wood - 1st house on this square - Jack Camem later - Ro. Gibb destroyed by fire - 1862

B - Wm. Cook - Capt Martin - McIver

C - Tom McIlhenny - Mrs. Quince

D - Mrs. Rivera - Ned Pierce - Ed Cantwell - bunkhouses - absorbed by school building

Mrs. Hemenway - Amy Bradley - 1865

E - Rich. Simpson - Pauline - Miss Amy Bradley

Page 138

Transcription from Charleston - News and Courier - Feb 1906

" The Negro population increase problem is attracting attention of wise men interested in such subjects. In 1880 Prof Gilliam announced that the Negro promised to increase his numbers in the United States in the brief space of a century to the alarming total of 200,000,000. Several years ago Thomas Nelson Page predicted, on a statistical authority, a Negro population of between 60,000,000 and 80,000,000 in the United States "before the end of the century". Prof Wilcox, of Cornell University, gives it as his opinion "that 25,000,000 is the maximum limit of the probable Negro population of this country a century hence, and it may fall several millions short of that figure." The present Negro population is 9,000,000."

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