A blog from Special Collections and University Archives


Posted: September 18, 2019

My name is Paige Hoeflich and I am a senior here at UNCW, double majoring in Anthropology and Communication Studies. I am originally from Maryland but moved to North Carolina in 2016 for school. Shortly after beginning my freshmen year, I uncovered my passion for culture and exploring cross-cultural interactions. During my time here, I have had the opportunity to study abroad, meet a ton of interesting people, complete a DIS research project on student adaptability and success, and grow both professionally and personally. My time here at UNCW has been packed full of many amazing experiences and opportunities, with my internship in the Museum of World Cultures being my current adventure! 

While completing this internship I will research and uncover information about groups of artifacts from the Ancient Mesoamerica region, which will be used to expand and supplement existing records. The first set of artifacts I am working with are from ancient Veracruz, the home of the Totonac people.

      

Currently I am researching and composing short excerpts that will be integrated into an online exhibit at the end of internship. The three artifacts that I am currently working with are a hollow smiling figure, a warrior that also doubles as a ceremonial whistle, and a seated figure with smooth black detailing signifying it was most likely used for sacrificial purposes.

  

The above artifacts range from 400-700 C.E. and provide a glimpse into the cultural practices of an ancient people. Handling these artifacts is a privilege, and I aim to enhance their history and accessibility, so other people can have the same opportunity to explore the history of the Veracruz region.

This internship will help me to develop technical skills in museum registration and curation practices and provide exposure to a professional work environment before graduation. In the future I hope to work in a field that combines the skills I have learned from both my Anthropology and Communication classes. This internship provides me with the opportunity to combine both of my majors while learning new skills in a field I have never explored before. Above all else, my internship is a learning experience that will provide me with the tools and technical know-how necessary to operate as a professional in the business world. 

 

 

Map images retrieved from:

https://www.visioninconsciousness.org/Ancient_Civilizations_07.htm

https://ontheroadin.com/veracruz-veracruz/

Photos taken by Paige Hoeflich

 

Posted in:
Posted: July 17, 2019

The curtains are about to fall on my time here in the Special Collections department of Randall Library at UNCW. It feels like it wasn’t that long ago that I sent the email to Miss. Rebecca that asked if I could do an internship here for the summer. That was the email that would officially begin my road towards achieving my dream of becoming an archivist. I have spent almost two months in this department honing my budding skills and gathering the professional experience that I was sorely lacking. To reach the next level from part-time grocery clerk and graduate student to the Archival version of the Jedi Padawan. Those two months have been one of the greatest experiences in my entire graduate career. 

I was like the excited, energetic little kid that was walking through an amusement park. From the first collection I processed to the last, I was journeying through and learning about a multitude of different subjects and topics that range from the theatre to environmentalism to World War II and more. You get to learn a universal amount of topics, which is one of my favorite things about the archival field. It is one of the things that attracts me to the career. From different topics to careers/fields to an individual’s personal story, I could practically learn about a host of things that come together to create our world. A world that I could access at any time either from the comfort of my office desk or taking a short stroll to the archival storage area to pull out a collection box. Overall, becoming a resident of a realm where having a detail-oriented mindset, the endless thirst for knowledge, and an unwavering passion for a field that you worked so hard to be a part of is a goal that I am now more determined than ever to see come to fruition.

With these qualities that will help mold me into the archivist that I want to be, I processed three collections in total with a “go get them, wake up, get up, get out there” attitude. The very first collection that I got to work with and process was the Steve E. Cooper Collection, who is a resident playwright who mainly wrote scripts that focus on LGBT rights. This collection was made up of ten scripts in total, which includes the Lambda Series, Aladdin, Think of Me in January, etc. It was both a fun and exciting first collection to ease me into the world of archiving. 

The second collection that I got to process was a bit of a doozy, which put my attention-to-detail mindset to the test. It was the Lena Ritter Papers. She was an environmental activist who relentlessly worked hard to protect the coast of North Carolina, including Stump Sound and Permuda Island. I was meticulous in making sure that all of those newspaper clippings, letters, copies, etc. were where they were supposed to be. I’ll admit, there were times where I was becoming a bit paranoid in making sure that this collection was not only chronologically arranged, but also in making sure that it was virtually clean of rusty staples and paper clippings. I can definitely say with confidence that this is the collection that I learned the most about archival work from. 

Finally, the last collection that I processed was probably my favorite collection out of the three that I got to work with. It was the North Carolina Shipbuilding Company Collection, which is a collection that tells the story of a Wilmington shipyard that was built for the purpose of building naval war ships for World War II. Not only did it include a historical document that was written up in 1945, a map, and two printing plates, but it also includes a variety of photographs that are of the shipyard, as well. Among these photographs were photos of the different ships that the NCSC built, which includes the Zebulon B. Vance. This ship was not only the first ship to be launched from the shipyard, but was also christened by Alice Broughton, who was the wife of North Carolina Governor, Joseph Melville Broughton. I also got to put the skills to use I learned from obtaining my history degree by conducting a lot of research for the historical background notes for this collection, which was a lot of fun. It was like doing journalism work to uncover the truth.  The truth can’t hide for long when this future archivist is on the case!

All three of these collections come together to create that coveted professional experience that I have so desperately been looking for. An experience that has both enhanced and given skills that will prove to be valuable allies in my quest to acquire the Holy Grail that is an archiving career. Of these skills, the ones that I am the most happy to learn are the ability to work with different archival technologies and the ability to familiarize myself with different arrangements that are used to organize collections physically and logically. For the latter, what I mean by that is that there is a big difference between arranging collections physically for storage and arranging them in a digital setting that allows researchers to specifically find what they are looking for. I learned this from processing the Ritter Collection. I was struggling to grasp this at first, but after I took my time and exercised patience, I eventually understood this skill.

That was one of the challenges that I faced in this internship. Like everything else in life, there is no such thing as a completely smooth road. You will encounter a few speed bumps or potholes along the way, which is what I did. The biggest challenges that faced me in this internship were maintaining a “patience is a virtue” attitude and swallowing my pride to ask for assistance for what I perceived to be issues that I felt I should have been able to resolve myself. I have a perfectionist mindset, which means that everything I do in a job has to be absolutely perfect. There can be no room for mistakes. If I make even one slip up, no matter how big or small that slip up may be, then I criticize myself. To say that I have high expectations of myself would be an understatement.

The way I handled it is that I keep remembering the fact that I am only human. I am supposed to make mistakes, which help me become a better archivist. There are going to be instances where I am not going to know how to resolve every issue. There is no such thing as an individual who virtually knows everything. Therefore, you shouldn’t be afraid to ask for help when you need it. When you ask somebody for help, you are also helping the researcher who is looking for information, as well. It hurts the researcher when you do not ask for assistance from your fellow archivists. Overall, I took it slow and got in the mindset to ask for help when I needed, which was how I overcame the challenges that came up during the internship.

These challenges did not put a damper on my perception of both this internship and libraries as a whole. Before I even began this internship, my initial perception was that the library is an information powerhouse that allows researchers to not only look for information in peace, but also to meet up with their fellow colleagues to exchange ideas. This internship not only bolstered that perception, but it has also changed it a little bit, as well. Now I perceive libraries as a community center where not only different departments can come together to exchange ideas, but also the entire town as a whole. There are almost no rooms in a library that are isolated in a back corner and hidden from the public. There were a couple of instances where I witnessed a few guests visit the Special Collections department to look through the vast treasure of collections that the department has. That further proves that both the Special Collections department and the library as a whole aim to continue fostering a strong relationship with the community that they reside in. It has made me want to be a part of that effort

Ultimately, I had a wonderful and enrichening experience here in the Special Collections department. I was finally able to put the knowledge that I have been gaining from my master’s program to practical use, which is one of the things that I am most happy about. I was able to create and build connections here that will last long after I leave. This will be an experience that will be a great resource for me to glean from as I eventually begin an archiving career of my own. It will also be an experience that I will never forget. I would like to thank both Miss. Rebecca Baugnon and Miss. Nicole Yatsonsky for taking me on as an intern in Special Collections. I also would like to thank everybody on campus, as well as the community of Wilmington, for showing me that awesome Seahawk hospitality. Thank you everybody and enjoy the rest of not just this summer, but the rest of the year, as well.

Category:
Posted: May 31, 2019

Greetings and salutations. Please allow me this opportunity to introduce myself. My name is Gavin Nelson. I am an intern doing a summer internship here at UNCW as part of a course I am taking in my university’s master’s program. Before I began my adventure into the world of libraries, I went to Western Carolina University for four years. It was there that I got a Bachelors  of Science in History, as well as two minors in Japanese and Business Law. I chose history as my field  of specialty because I have always been fascinated with the past, which I believe can play a tremendous role in helping us forge a great future. It is also like reading through one big storybook that is filled with tales of adventure, excitement, and more.  Specifically, my favorite subjects of history include Asian history, European history, and Military history.

After I graduated from WCU, I decided that I want to use that degree to become a “gatekeeper of information,” as my dad put it. I felt a desire to work with a vast variety of data and information for the purpose of sharing wonderful and amazing stories with my community. Towards that end, I officially made the decision to open the door and step through into the world of library and information studies. I began my journey towards my destiny by entering a master’s program that is offered by the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Not only have I been in the program since 2018, but I also just finished my third semester of the program. I officially have only one more semester left before I graduate with a master’s degree in Library and Information Studies. It won’t be long before I can say the iconic line that Howard Wolowitz from Big Bang Theory said, which was “I have a master’s degree!” With that degree, I plan to go into the field of archiving, which is the dream career that I am diligently working towards.  This internship is going to help me get that coveted professional experience that will help achieve that dream.

Outside of my studies, I do have some favorite pastime activities that help me  relax and reenergize. My most favorite activities to partake in are playing video-games, watching crime documentaries and crime shows, and watching video-game let’s plays and streams on YouTube.  I think of them as a temporary escape from reality whenever I need to get rid of stress and unwind. 

For this internship, there are some goals, both personal and professional, that I would like to accomplish. The goals that I am aiming to accomplish are the following:

Professional Goals:

  1. Digitization. I would like to really learn about the process of digitizing archival materials and sharing them in the cyber realm. I strongly believe that technology is going to have a major impact on how archives are going to be run. I would like to get ahead of it and learn these technological skills now so that I won’t be playing catch-up later.
  2. Acquire professional experience working with archival materials.  I would like to get experience acquiring, processing, arranging, preserving, and sharing archival materials. It is actually one of the big reasons why I am doing this internship. Up until this point, I have yet to gain any library experience. This internship will be a tremendous help in accomplishing this goal.
  3. Explore the relationship that the archives department has with the rest of the academic community. I am thinking about working in an academic library, and I am interested in seeing for myself how the Special Collections department interacts with the academic community.

Personal Goals:

  1. Finally acquire some real library experience. As I previously mentioned, I have yet to accumulate any ounce of library experience. I recently tried to apply for a library job, but that didn’t go through. It was mainly because I wasn’t exposed to customer service, which involves working with my community. I was determined to do something about it. I decided to get a part-time job at my local grocery store, which involves interacting with the public on a daily basis.  That is the job that I currently have now, but it is not the dream job that I want to have. This internship will give me that much-needed experience that will help me land that dream job.
  2. Have fun! I personally believe that if you want to be successful at any job that you do, you have to have fun. You need to be happy! Joyful!  Enthusiastic! Have a “Boot-Scooting Boogie” attitude that makes others laugh and want to join in on the fun and excitement! At my current job, I always try to have fun and party like a wild, party animal! It is what makes my guest love me! It was how I earned the title of Employee of the Month. Overall, I am making it my mission to not only do my absolute best in this internship, but also to have big, bang, boogey woogey fun at the same time! Also, I am going to try to look good while doing it in my blue suede shoes!

All of the goals that I have listed are representatives of what I am hoping to gain from this awesome experience. I want to be exposed to the amusement park that is archives. I want to go on all of the gentle and thrill rides that make up the archival department. Afterwards, I want to share the awesome time that I have at this amusement park with everyone else. Personally, that is what I believe archives are all about.  Archivists acquire a wide variety of stories and experience them for themselves. Afterwards, they share this experience with their community and invite them to come experience these stories, as well.  That is what I would like to do when I eventually begin my future library career. That is what I am hoping to learn and experience through this internship. Each of the goals that I have listed will give me the tools that I need to get the most fun and experience out of the rollercoaster that will not just be this internship, but also my future library career as well.

Category:
Posted: November 06, 2015

Sammy C. Hawk stopped by the Midnite Madness exhibit to say hi and take a few photos!

  

 

The new exhibit at Randall Library by University Archives now has a new component.  Take a short 7 question quiz about the information in the exhibit, enter your name at the end (optional) and be entered to win a UNCW themed prize.  This quiz can be answered multiple different ways, depending on the amount of time you have.

 

Find the quiz here!

http://library.uncw.edu/archives_special/forms/midnight-madness-quiz

 

By visiting the exhibit in person, you will be able to find all the information on the quiz in text boxes and captions.

 

You can also view the online exhibit here and find the answers: http://library.uncw.edu/archives_special/exhibits/seahawks-after-dark-evolution-midnite-madness

 

You can also watch a short video, roughly 2.5 minutes long, that will also give you all the information you need to answer the quiz.

 

 

 

Posted: October 16, 2015

A new exhibit about Midnite Madness at the University of North Carolina Wilmington is now on display in the library during operating hours. Check out "Seahawks After Dark" in an exhibit case adjacent to University Archives, Randall Library Room 2008, in between Honors College and University Archives.

   

Midnite Madness honors the start of the UNCW basketball season, and is typically held on a Friday in mid-October. Historically, basketball players could not legally take the court to train until the Friday closest to the 15th of October. This led many schools to start practice soon after midnight on the appointed day to get as much practice time as possible. UNCW held its first Midnight Madness event in 1990. Over the years, and with a couple of rule changes, a name change from "Midnight" to "Midnite," and the addition of other campus wide events, Midnite Madness has evolved to become a week-long celebration for both men's and women's basketball.

 

This exhibit showcases historic photographs of former basketball players and the student body, as well as tangible items portraying Seahawk Spirit. Images of the first flyer advertising the event from the student-run newspaper The Seahawk can be seen along-side flyers from more recent years. The exhibit also displays Midnite Madness t-shirts, one dating to 1998 and others that current students will recognize from past years. The exhibit even shows historic images of the UNCW mascot in its early form, visible on a Student Telephone Directory from the 1989-1990 school year and the "new" logo unvieled in The Seahawk newspaper in 1986.

  

 

Midnite Madness 2015 is on Friday, October 23 with festivities all week. For more information on Midnite Madness, see http://www.uncwsports.com/index.aspx?path=mbball

To view a digital exhibit, see

http://library.uncw.edu/archives_special/exhibits/seahawks-after-dark-evolution-midnite-madness.

 

 

Posted in:
Posted: February 13, 2015
University Archives worked together with the Honors College to curate an exhibit on the history of Honors at UNCW. The Honors College is currently celebrating two anniversaries: 50 years of Departmental Honors and 20 years of the Honors Scholars Program. Drawing on materials from the Honors College and University Archives documents and artifacts, the exhibit traces the path of honors from Departmental Honors to the Honors Scholars Program to the Honors College of today. 
 
Title banner for Honors College Exhibit: Celebrating Honors College    Graduate Assistant Beth Bullock standing next to the Honors exhibit.
 
Departmental Honors began in 1965, allowing seniors to undertake a yearlong thesis project and graduate “with honors” in their major. In 1994, the Honors Scholars Program was initiated. This program offered an option for students to take part in a four-year honors curriculum and graduate with university honors. In 2011, the Honors Scholars Program was renamed the Honors College to honor its growth and success.
 
 
The exhibit showcases major milestones in the history of Honors, displaying the first thesis, completed in 1965 by Phyllis Boyles; a photo of the first graduate of the 4-year program, Nicholas Allen; and a program from the 2011 dedication of the Honors College. The exhibit also illuminates the wide variety of activities and opportunities the Honors College has sponsored over the years, including research conferences and journals, honors student trips, an award-winning newsletter, and other publications. The exhibit also highlights a few honors students who are now current faculty members, such as Dr. Tom Lankford and Dr. Julian Keith. 
 
Track Team photo from 1983 Fledgling yearbook. Photo includes two honors students, Tom Lankford and Julian Keith.
 
The exhibit will be on display over homecoming weekend and will remain on display through graduation. For more on the Honors College’s anniversaries and homecoming activities visit their website: http://uncw.edu/honors/honors5020.html
 
Posted in:
Posted: December 08, 2014

 

Archives  Collections: A to Z

Disclaimer: This is not a Records Schedule, which is a much more detailed listing of materials in a University Archives, categorized by function or department. Rather, the purpose of this A-Z list is to identify some of the basic must-haves in Archives.

A

  • Accreditation/self-study reports
  • Admissions guides, bulletins, brochures
  • Alumni magazines and directories
  • Anniversary celebrations - planning materials, publicity, brochures, event information, scrapbooks.
  • Annual reports by offices, units, departments, divisions, college/school, and Chancellor
  • Apparel - see Textiles
  • Architectural plans/designs/blueprints/drawings
  • Area studies/campus studies/traffic studies
  • Art exhibition guides
  • Athletics - programs, news releases, guides, schedules, reports, correspondence, photographs, videos
  • Audit reports
  • Awardee information - biographical information, news releases, and announcements pertaining to faculty, staff, students, and alumni awards
  • Awards and certificates for the university and its departments

B

  • Benchmark Studies
  • BIG (Brand Identity Guide)
  • Board of Trustees – minutes, correspondence, oaths of office, biographical data, official photos, rosters, Executive Committee minutes, commitee minutes and reports
  • Board of Visitors - minutes, rosters, executive committee minutes, committee reports
  • Books, serials, journals, newspapers, and magazines not published by UNCW, but exclusively for or about UNCW
  • Books, serials, journals, newspapers, and magazines published by UNCW, its departments, student organizations or classes
  • Budget reports (official, annual)
  • Business Week programs

C

  • Calendars of Events
  • Camps and youth programs - brochures, guides, policies, reports
  • Campus Crime Awareness and Security Act Reports (annual)
  • Capital Improvements – architect’s proposals, change orders, budget reports.
  • Codes of Student Life/Student Handbooks (annual)
  • Common Data Set
  • Commencement programs, videos, photographs, and speeches
  • Committees and task forces of faculty, staff, and students - minutes, reports, charge, accomplishments
  • Conference programs for university-initiated or sponsored conferences or workshops
  • Contracts (selected)
  • Convocation programs, videos, photoraphs, and speeches
  • Core values
  • Course catalogs
  • Course schedules
  • Cultural activities – brochures, reports, videos
  • Curriculum – committee reports, University Studies reports, updates, news

D

  • Donors – Report of
  • Directory information (student public records formerly published in telephone directories)
  • Directories, miscellaneous (department and school)
  • Directories of Club Sports teams
  • Directories of Student Organization
  • Deans Council - minutes, committee reports, charges

E

  • Equal Employment Opportunity /Affirmative Action Plan (HR)
  • "External Programs" - programs, course descriptions, workshop descriptions for continuing studies

F

  • Faculty Senate minutes, announcements, motions, correspondence, and committee minutes, reports, etc.
  • Factsheets/IPEDS data
  • Financial reports (annual)
  • Foundational documents such as charters, certificates of establishment, acts of legislation central to university development, etc.
  • Friends of UNCW – Annual Reports, minutes, committee reports

G

  • Governance - see Staff Senate, Faculty Senate, Student Government Association, Graduate Student Association
  • Graduate Council - minutes, announcements, motions, correspondence, executive committee minutes, etc.
  • Graduate theses
  • Grants, Awarded. Final reports, statistics of grants activity, proposals.
  • Graduate Student Association - minutes, correspondence, motions, reports, committee charges and accomplishments
  • Groundbreakings and Openings of Buildings  - programs, photographs, announcements, news releases, videos, news articles
  • Guidelines for Publications
  • Guides to Financial Aid

H

  • Handbooks - Faculty
  • Handbooks - Student Organizations
  • Histories of campus and departments
  • Honor Codes
  • Honorary societies - minutes, correspondence, reports, newsletters
  • Honors Papers
  • Housing – Guide to

I

  • Installation, Chancellor. Programs, speeches, event listings, articles, photographs, videos
  • Inventory of Fixed Assets

J

  • Judicial procedures for student conduct

 

K

  • Knowledge production - Copyright registration by UNCW and applications after expiration of copyright; Patent awards, applications, and notice of awards after expiration

L

  • Legal - selected agreements, consent decrees, memoranda of understanding, deeds of sale of university property, etc.
  • Legislation - Acts passed by NC General Assembly
  • Literary and art magazines
  • Long-Range Plans

M

  • Maps
  • Master Plans
  • Memorabilia, historical
  • Mission Statement

N

  • New Faculty and Staff - directories and profiles
  • News articles, editorials, and columns about UNCW from local, statewide, national, and international media organizations
  • News releases
  • Newsletters

O

  • On Campus Living – Guide to
  • Off Campus Living – Guide to
  • Oral Histories - Faculty, Students, Staff, Trustees (including retired)
  • Orientation Guides

P

  • Parents, Guide for
  • Performances - videos, photographs
  • Personnel records (faculty and staff) (selected, after a waiting period)
  • Photographs (University Relations)
  • Planning, Univearsity - correspondence, reports, statistics
  • Policies and Procedures – UNCW
  • Progress Measures Reports
  • Programs - Kenan Auditorium, Department of Music, Department of Theatre, Department of Art
  • Proposals to Establish New Degree Programs
  • Publications, Campus

Q

  • Quality Enhancement Plan
  • Questionnaires - Summary reports and conclusions from student, staff, and faculty surveys

R

  • Razor Walker Awards programs - Watson College of Education
  • Reports prepared for Board of Governors or UNC System President (i.e. UNC Tomorrow)
  • Research / faculty scholarship / student scholarship / creative works by faculty and students (collecting in these areas is coordinated by library with participation of Archives)

S

  • Salary increases and compensation for faculty faculty-reports
  • Scholarships - announcements, names of recipients, acknowledgments of gifts, photographs
  • Scrapbooks
  • Senior Sankofa programs and vidoes - Upperman Center
  • Service Awards luncheons programs and videos
  • Service Learning - eTEAL courses, programs, mission, reports, studies
  • Speeches by chancellor, provost, and senior staff
  • Staff Senate-minutes, announcements, motions, correspondence, reports and committee minutes, reports, etc.
  • Strategic Plans
  • Student Government Association-minutes, announcements, motions, correspondence, reports and committees minutes, announcements, motions, correspondence, reports, charge, accomplishments
  • Student Organization Directories for registered student organizations
  • Student Services - programs, photographs, reports, policies
  • Study Abroad - programs, reports, brochures, posters, photographs
  • Summer School - catalogs, course listings, publications, publicity, special events
  • Synergy – first-year student common read book is collected annually

T

  • Teaching - Blackboard courses, etc.
  • Textiles significant to UNCW-quilts, robes, hoods
  • Telephone directories
  • Timelines
  • Transfer Guides

U

  • UNCW Foundation - Annual Reports, minutes, committee reports
  • University Advancment - Records and statistics for major gifts and inactive endowments
  • University code

V

  • Videos (promotional/Utube/Sports/UNCW Presents/ UNCW Media programming
  • Vision Statement
  • Visual Oral Histories - videotaped oral history recordings. See Oral Histories.

W

  • Works of art reflecting UNCW

X

  • Xeroxed copies (or photocopies) may be acceptable for certain materials, such as final reports and approved minutes. We will want to note where signed originals are permanently kept if Archives maintains photocoopies.

Y

  • Yearbooks

Z

  • Zip discs, floppy disks, cdroms, and other obsolete media. We will work with you on retrieving data from these obsolete media if the information contained on it fit our collecting criteria.
Posted in:
Posted: November 13, 2014

Brochure with map of the preserve     Front of a brochure for the preserve

This month marks 40 years since the dedication of the Herbert Bluethenthal Memorial Wildflower Preserve at UNCW on November 8, 1974. The preserve honors the memory of Herbert Bluethenthal, a successful business-owner in Wilmington.

The university set aside about 10 acres of land behind Hoggard Hall and near the university’s existing nature trail. New trails were created in order to grant easy access to areas that included excellent examples of the native flora of Southeastern North Carolina.  The preserve has been further developed over the years to offer the best examples of unique plants of the region.

The dedication ceremony featured the unveiling of the memorial to Herbert Bluethenthal by his widow, Mrs. Janet Bleuthenthal, as well as the presentation of a monument honoring contributions to botany by Dr. Bertram Wells, a noted botanist who worked in North Carolina for much of his career. Both Dr. Wells and Mrs. Bleuthenthal were honored guests at the dedication.

The preserve is intended for use both by the public as well as students in fields such as biology. The University Archives has a range of materials about Bluethenthal Wildflower Preserve and the dedication including photos, brochures, Seahawk newspaper articles, and newspaper clippings in the university’s annual scrapbooks.

2014 photo of Bluethenthal Memorial  2014 photo of bench area in Bluethenthal Preserve

Herbert's brother, Arthur, served with the French as a bomber pilot along with other Americans during World War I. He was the first North Carolinian killed in action in World War I.

 

Resources from Archives: 

Bluethenthal Preserve Brochure

The Seahawk, November 20, 1974

Photo from Dedication Ceremony

Posted in:
Posted: September 16, 2014

Lauren Love is an intern working in Special Collections


Recently, we’ve acquired the personal papers of Dr. Walter Conser, a professor of Religious Studies and History here at UNCW. Spanning his career to date, this collection includes materials related to the research of Dr. Conser’s various interests including the religion and history of the Southeast, Native American studies, nonviolence and civilian-based defense.

A collection of nonviolence pamphlets written by Gene Sharp

 

Within the personal papers of Dr. Conser are a collection of nonviolence pamphlets written by Gene Sharp. These along with a small assortment of vinyl records from the 1960s are part of a series of nonviolence related materials included in this collection.
 

Presently, the collection is being assessed and rehoused. By the end of the semester there will be a searchable Finding Aid for researchers to use on our website.
 

Many of the books Dr. Conser has worked on as a contributor, author, and/or editor can be found in the Randall Library General Collection.

 

 

Posted in:
Posted: August 25, 2014

Exhibit Opening, Panel Presentation and Reception

Randall Library Auditorium, RL2047

This exhibit from University Archives invites visitors to witness UNCW’s evolution, stunning accomplishments, and shining role in higher education since 1947.

Wilmington College students enrolled in technical courses such as masonry, drafting, and air conditioning and refrigeration. When the college achieved university status and joined the UNC system in 1969, the chancellor declared

The University of North Carolina is a magnificent system of higher education institutions located throughout the state, but the University of North Carolina at Wilmington is the jewel in this education crown.

--William H. Wagoner
President, Wilmington College, 1968-1969
Chancellor, the University of North Carolina Wilmington, 1969-1990

 

Guest Speakers:

Dorothy Powell Marshall, faculty member and registrar at Wilmington College and UNCW, 1949-1992

Bertha Todd, Williston College Librarian

Ty Rowell, Former UNCW Vice Chancellor for University Advancement

Adina Riggins (Moderator) University Archivist

The Jewel in the Crown will be in Special Collections at Randall Library through December 3, 2014.

The Jewel in the Crown: The University of North Carolina Wilmington

A Journey and Legacy

 

Posted in:

Pages