Randall Library Home
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Subject: 
Semester and Year: 
Fall 2016
Course number: 
HST 414/554
Instructor: 
Mollenauer, Lynn

Below are some resources that should be useful for you when doing your research for your research paper in HST 414/554 this semester. Do not limit yourselves to these! If you have any questions, feel free to get in touch with your librarian (contact information is on the right).

Secondary Source Databases

JSTOR

Scholarly journals in anthropology, art, art history, communication studies, criminology, ecology, economics, education, English, film studies, foreign languages and literatures, geography, geology, history, mathematics, music, philosophy, political science, public and international affairs, religion, social work, sociology, statistics, theatre, and other humanities and social sciences. 

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Historical Abstracts

Historical Abstracts covers the history of the world (excluding the United States and Canada) focusing on the 15th century forward, including art history, world history, military history, women's history, history of education, foreign languages and literatures, and more.

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Iter: gateway to the Middle Ages and Renaissance

Contains electronic resources for the study and teaching of Medieval and Renaissance studies.

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Search the Library Catalog


Search by:

To search for rare books in the History of Medicine collection in Randall Library's Special Collections, go to the UNCW Library Catalog link below the main search box on the library homepage. Hover over "New Search" and click on "Advanced Keyword" to get to the advanced search page

Then, in the first search box, enter your search terms, and in the second search box, enter History of Medicine. Under "Location," choose "Special Collections," and hit "Submit." 

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Primary Source Databases and Websites

HathiTrust

Partnership of major research institutions and libraries working to ensure that the cultural record is preserved and accessible long into the future

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Making Of The Modern World

The Making of the Modern World provides digital facsimile images of primary sources that track the development of the modern, western world through the lens of trade and wealth. Full-text searching across millions of pages of works from the periods 1450-1850, 1851-1914, and 1890-1945 provides researchers access to material for research in the areas of history, political science, social conditions, technology and industry, economics, area studies and more. Includes books, serials, pamphlets, essays and more.

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Early English Books Online

Early English Books Online (EEBO) contains digital facsimile page images of virtually every work printed in England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and British North America and works in English printed elsewhere from 1473-1700 - from the first book printed in English by William Caxton, through the age of Spenser and Shakespeare and the tumult of the English Civil War. Access includes Thomason Tracts and Early English Books Tract Supplement.

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National Library of Medicine Digital Collections

Digital Collections is the National Library of Medicine's free online resource of biomedical books and still and moving images. All of the content in Digital Collections is freely available worldwide and, unless otherwise indicated, in the public domain. Digital Collections provides unique access to NLM's rich resources.

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National Library of Medicine Digital Projects

Historical and contemporary sources for research and education

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Medical Heritage Library

The Medical Heritage Library (MHL), a digital curation collaborative among some of the world’s leading medical libraries, promotes free and open access to quality historical resources in medicine. 

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World Health Organization Historical Collection

The Rare Book Collection consists largely of documentation acquired by the OIHP on epidemics included in the International Sanitary Conventions such as plague, cholera and yellow fever.

Materials covering smallpox, malaria and other diseases prevalent at the beginning of the XX century, are also included. The oldest book on plague dates from 1507 while the oldest treatise on epidemiology was published in 1518.

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Wellcome Library

The Library's digital collections cover a wide variety of topics, including asylums, food, sex and sexual health, genetics, public health and war.

Published books, pamphlets, archives, posters, photographs, and film and sound recordings are completely free to view. Digitized materials are released under a variety of Creative Commons non-commercial, attribution and Public Domain licenses.

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Contagion: Historical Views of Diseases and Epidemics

This online collection from Harvard University offers important historical perspectives on the science and public policy of epidemiology today and contributes to the understanding of the global, social–history, and public–policy implications of diseases.

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Seeing is Believing

Illustrations were essential in spreading new scientific and medical ideas, and it was often the case that new developments in the sciences were accompanied by corresponding developments in illustrative techniques. These techniques are the subject of Seeing Is Believing, which complements an exhibition of the same name on view from October 23, 1999-February 19, 2000 at The New York Public Library's Humanities and Social Sciences Library.

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Historical Images in Medicine

The Medical Center Library’s Historical Images in Medicine (HIM) collections encompass over 3,000 photographs, illustrations, engravings, and bookplates from the history of the health and life sciences. 

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Osler Library Prints Collection

The Osler Library Prints Collection brings together a rich variety of visual documents related to the history of medicine, spanning several centuries, countries, and artistic media. Ranging from the seventeenth to the twentieth century, the collection consists predominantly of prints, though it also includes some photographs, drawings, posters, and cartoons.

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Anatomia

This collection features approximately 4500 full page plates and other significant illustrations of human anatomy selected from the Jason A. Hannah and Academy of Medicine collections in the history of medicine at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, University of Toronto. Each illustration has been fully indexed using medical subject headings (MeSH), and techniques of illustration, artists, and engravers have been identified whenever possible. There are ninety-five individual titles represented, ranging in date from 1522 to 1867.

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Brought to Life: Exploring the History of Medicine

A website provided by the Science Museum, London. It offers access to images of thousands of objects from the Museum’s medical collections. The site also incorporates detailed descriptions, introductions to major themes in the history of medicine and engaging multimedia.

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Casebooks Project

A digital edition of Simon Forman’s & Richard Napier’s medical records 1596–1634

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ECHO

ECHO (Exploring and Collecting History Online) is a directory to 5,000+ websites concerning the history of science, technology, and industry. From George Mason University.

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William Harvey experiment

History Librarian

Stephanie
Crowe
Social Sciences Librarian/Lecturer
Phone Number: 
Office: 
RL 2058

Twitter: @shcrowe

Writing Help

Citation and Bibliography Help

Vetted & reliable tools collected by Randall Library.

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Writing Services

The Writing Center in the University Learning Center is located on the first floor of DePaolo Hall (DE 1003).

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Read&Write Gold

Free to UNCW faculty, staff, and students, Read&Write Gold is "a flexible literacy software solution that can help readers and writers...access support tools needed to reach their potential, build confidence and independence and succeed."

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