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  • Posted: October 02, 2017
    Exhibit for MIFLC 2017

    Randall welcomes the Mountain Interstate Foreign Language Conference with an exhibit!

    About the Conference

    The Mountain Interstate Foreign Language Conference (MIFLC) is an annual forum of university, college, and high school scholars and teachers for exchanging ideas and advancing the cause of scholarship in foreign language studies.

    This year, MIFLC will take place October 5 - 7, 2017 and is hosted by UNCW and the UNCW Department of World Languages and Cultures.

    Learn more here by visiting this year's conference website.

    About the Exhibit

    Randall Library celebrates MIFLC with an exhibit in the New & Popular Book Area on Randall's first floor. The exhibit highlights a wide range of foreign language materials, many of which connect to the Conference’s panel discussions and events.

    For instance, for the panel "'And What of the Fool?': Exploring Folly Across Time and Space," the exhibit displays Escomium Moriae (The Praise of Folly) by Desiderius Erasmus, a rare volume from Randall Library Special Collections. Desiderius Erasmus was the foremost humanist and scholar of the northern Renaissance, known for his editions of Classical authors, Church Fathers, and the New Testament. He was a friend to John Colet and Sir Thomas More, and an opponent and rival of Martin Luther. Erasmus was a voice of moderation in the Reformation and earned the criticism of both Protestants and Catholics.

    The Praise of Folly was Erasmus’ most popular work. The title Encomium Moriae is a multilingual pun, implying in Greek a speech of praise by Folly (Moria) and in Latin a speech in praise of Thomas More. Erasmus began composing the work while visiting More at his Chelsea home in 1509. The work was published in 1511 and 42 Latin editions appeared during Erasmus’ lifetime. It was also translated into French (1520), German (1520), and English (1549).

    The French edition from Randall Library’s Special Collections was published in 1735 and includes well-known pen and ink illustrations created for the work by Hans Holbein the Younger in 1515.  A number of other versions of The Praise of Folly can be found in the exhibit and are available for checkout, along with all the exhibit materials, from our Circulation Desk.

    The exhibit will be on display through October. 

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