Randall Library Home
  • Posted: March 12, 2020
    Remote library services

    Please visit our “Remote Library Services” webpage for information about remote library support for teaching, learning and research to help faculty, students, and staff transition from in-person instruction.

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  • Posted: March 12, 2020

    The library will continue to update this page with additional or new information as needed.

    Please visit our Remote Library Services page for more information about remote library support for teaching, learning and research, as well as answers to frequently asked questions about services such as returning books, accessing the physical collection, and using our online collections.

    Building Access

    • Randall Library is closed to faculty, staff, students and the community. Remote support will remain available and you can reach us by email, chat, or text
    • The Faculty Commons, Distance Education Classroom, Honors Classroom, Library Instruction Classrooms, and the Auditorium are not available to be used or reserved while the library is closed. Any current reservations are canceled until the Library reopens. 

    Returns 

    • Due dates have been extended to August 21 and fines will not be assessed during the library's closure. 
    • You may return materials to the book return slot to the left of the library's main entrance or the book drop located in Parking Lot D.
    • If you have left the Wilmington area, you may request a prepaid return label by filling out this form
    • Please note that returned materials will not be removed from accounts immediately as staff are working limited hours in the building.

    Services

    • Request items for the library's physical collection through the contactless pick-up service. 
    • ILL staff can scan a specific chapter or section of a book in the library's physical collection and deliver it electronically. Please complete the Article/Book Chapter request form.
    • Fines will not be assessed during the library's closure. Specific questions about library fines and fees can be directed to rlcirculation [at] uncw.edu.
    • Please visit our Remote Library Services webpage for more information about remote library support for teaching, learning and research. This page includes answers to frequently asked questions about services such as returning books, accessing the physical collection, and using our online collections.
    • As is the case for the rest of UNCW, the library faculty and staff are following the guidelines that the campus has set for teleworking. We hope that students, faculty, and staff prioritize requests for assistance and collections with that in mind. Our highest priority at the moment is supporting the teaching and learning goals of the university. 

    Using the Library Remotely

    • Please visit our Remote Library Services webpage for more information about remote library support for teaching, learning and research. This page includes answers to frequently asked questions about services such as returning books, accessing the physical collection, and using our online collections.

    University Information

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  • Posted: March 06, 2020

    This event has been canceled.

    UNCW Digital Humanities Initiative presents:

    The Boundaries of Digital Humanities

    This talk considers the boundary trouble of digital humanities, variously described as a field, a metadiscipline, a community of practice, an academic fad, or—according to Matthew Kirschenbaum—a “tactical term.” While DH can be useful in some contexts, in others it creates problems. I draw upon my own experiences implementing DH at research universities and within my own scholarly work and teaching to reframe DH in terms of field conversations, collaboration, and interdisciplinarity.

    Monday, April 6, 2020, 3:30 p.m., Bear Hall 106

    Light refreshments will be served.

    Paul Fyfe is an associate professor of English at North Carolina State University. His research and teaching compass British Victorian literature, comparative media studies, and digital humanities. He is the author of By Accident or Design: Writing the Victorian Metropolis (Oxford UP 2015, paperback 2020) and is working on a new book called Digital Victorians: Technology, Literature, and Transmission which has been generously supported by the American Council of Learned Societies and the National Humanities Center. He participates in a number of DH projects including: Oceanic Exchanges which tracks information flow across international nineteenth-century newspaper networks; Illustrated Image Analytics which experiments with how computer vision can search and sort Victorian periodical illustrations; and Victoria's Lost Pavilion which virtually reconstructs Queen Victoria's garden pavilion as a three-dimensional model.

    This event is sponsored by the College of Arts & Sciences and Randall Library.

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