Library News for October 2021

  • Posted: October 29, 2021
    Open Access Week 2021: Author Spotlight #6

    OA Fund Recipient Spotlight: Soo Kim-Godwin and Meen Hye Lee, School of Nursing, College of Health and Human Services 

    Dr Kim-Godwin and Dr Lee's article, Factors Influencing Sleep Quality among Female Staff Nurses during the Early COVID-19 Pandemic in the United States, was published in the open access journal International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. Read it here: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094827

    Research summary from the authors:
    "...My colleagues (Meen Hye Lee,  etc.) and I  (Soo Kim-Godwin) surveyed female staff nurses to assess the overall level of sleep quality during the COVID-19  pandemic. As expected we found that nurses reported poor sleep quality. We collected the survey data using an online survey from April to May 2020 from a sample of 215 female staff nurses enrolled in post-licensure online nursing programs in the school of Nursing at UNCW. Our study evaluated seven subcomponents of overall sleep quality: subjective sleep quality, sleep latency ( how long it takes to fall asleep), sleep duration, habitual sleep efficiency, sleep disturbances, the use of sleeping medications, and daytime dysfunction. We found full-time work, poor physical health, lower self-care and self-regulation, and higher work stress negatively impact sleep quality. We strongly suggest that hospital administrators should consider developing intervention programs for improving the work environment, which would impact sleep quality, health status, and job performance among nurses."

    Why did you decide to publish open access? 
    "More and more people are moving towards open access (OA) journals. One of the biggest benefits is that  OA allows access for researchers, as well as the general public without a subscription. It has been reported that many studies demonstrate that OA literature receives more citations than subscription publications because it reduces permission requirements and eliminates price barriers for readers. One downside of OA is the payment (We are so grateful that we were able to publish our  article with support from the library's APC fund.)"

    What advice do you have for others who want to publish open access? 
    "While Open Access (OA) increases visibility, we should be aware that there is considerable pushback to use open access. In my opinion, predatory publishers are a significant threat to open access publishing The first advice is that you need to evaluate the quality of the journal. When selecting a journal for your publication, review publications in the journal you are considering to assess the scientific rigor and editorial quality of the publications.  I usually check the impact factor to evaluate the journals credentials. Another option for authors is to consult with librarians affiliated with your institution or a local public library. Librarians are well-suited to provide guidance in helping authors with selecting quality journals to consider for publication. "
    Randall Library will be spotlighting authors who've received our funding to publish in open access journals all week long! Find more information about our full slate of OA Week 2021 events here: https://lib.uncw.edu/OAWeek2021
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  • Posted: October 29, 2021
    Open Access Week 2021: Author Spotlight #5

    OA Fund Recipient Spotlight: William Opoku-Agyeman, School of Health and Applied Human Sciences, College of Health and Human Services

    Dr Opoku-Agyeman's article, Factors that Determine Comprehensive Categorical Classification of EHR Implementation Levels, was published in the open access journal Health Services Insights. Read it here: https://doi.org/10.1177/11786329211024788

    Research summary from the authors:
    "The study explores what hospital organizations' characteristics are associated with adopting and implementing different types of comprehensive EHR. Using multiple years of hospital data, we explored this relationship. We found that hospitals with a greater amount of human resources and financial assets were more likely to have implemented higher levels of EHR."

    Why did you decide to publish open access?
    "To allow the knowledge generated to be widely and readily available for the audience to review and learn in a convenient form."

    What advice do you have for others who want to publish open access?
    "I would say go for it. If you have the funds to publish in open access, that will be great, and it allows the audience to have ready access to your work."
    Randall Library will be spotlighting authors who've received our funding to publish in open access journals all week long! Find more information about our full slate of OA Week 2021 events here: https://lib.uncw.edu/OAWeek2021
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  • Posted: October 28, 2021
    Open Access Week 2021: ICPSR Talk with Mike Maume and Jake Day

    Join Drs. Mike Maume and Jake Day for a conversation about open data resources in the social sciences! This talk about ICPSR and open data will take place on Friday, October 29, from 11AM-12PM to cap off Open Access Week. Register at https://lib.uncw.edu/canon-of-worms-OA2021

    In addition, ORCID registration is ongoing on Friday! Grab your spot at https://lib.uncw.edu/ORCID.

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  • Posted: October 27, 2021
    Open Access Week 2021: Author Spotlight #4

    OA Fund Recipient Spotlight: Seoyoon Woo, School of Nursing, College of Health and Human Services

    Dr Woo's article, Stigma Experiences in People with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: An Integrative Review, was published in the open access International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. Read it here: https://doi.org/10.2147/COPD.S306874 

    Research summary from the authors:

    "People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are stigmatized by their smoking history. It can adversely affect their self-management, including improving physical activity levels, medication adherence, and quality of life. Thus, this study aimed to review relevant, scientific literature to learn about stigma experiences and their impacts on people with COPD. We found fifteen studies that described COPD-related stigma processes. There were moderating factors of the COPD-related stigma process; that included visibility (use of inhaler/oxygen), origin (smoking history), and illness perception (people’s perception of COPD). Regarding responses to stigma, COPD-related stigma was related to emotional distress, limited social interactions, and negative effects on medication adherence and help-seeking. In addition, COPD-related stigma was affected by healthcare providers’ and employers’ behaviors. We found that smoking was interwoven throughout all domains of stigma processes and responses to stigma.."

    Why did you decide to publish open access?

    "When I searched for journals that fit my manuscript, I started from the JANE journal finder. Relevant journals from the JANE were open access. Also, I talked with co-authors because they have been published papers related to my topic. Their suggested journals were open access ones as well."

    What advice do you have for others who want to publish open access?

    "I was very satisfied with the publication process of the journal that I selected and published my manuscript. One thing that I had to take most time was to check copyright permission to use a figure in a book and evaluation tools. The publisher that I selected and published my manuscript said that they are a commercial company, so there should be very clear agreement on the use of third-party material. Thus, if you plan to publish open access and have third-party material in your manuscript or are not sure about anything, I would like to recommend checking with the publisher in advance."

    Randall Library will be spotlighting authors who've received our funding to publish in open access journals all week long! Find more information about our full slate of OA Week 2021 events here: https://lib.uncw.edu/OAWeek2021
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  • Posted: October 27, 2021
    Open Access Week 2021: Author Spotlight #3
    OA Fund Recipient Spotlight: Kate Nooner, Dept of Psychology

    Dr Nooner's article, Retaining Adolescent and Young Adult Participants in Research During a Pandemic: Best Practices From Two Large-Scale Developmental Neuroimaging Studies (NCANDA and ABCD), was published in the open access journal Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience. Read it here: https://doi.org/10.3389/fnbeh.2020.597902

    Research summary from the authors:

    "The APC fund-supported work focused on keeping adolescents and young adults involved in longitudinal research projects during the pandemic. Unfortunately, alcohol and substance use problems that start in adolescence can continue throughout a lifetime and have serious negative consequences. This paper gave suggestions to researchers working with adolescents and young adults in alcohol and substance use-related research on keeping participants from dropping out of studies during the COVID-19 pandemic.  Sadly, during the pandemic, rates of alcohol intoxication and overdose increased. Because of this increase in alcohol and substance use during the pandemic, researchers need to continue to follow participants to understand what is going on and find the best solutions. The paper published with APC funded-support gave specific suggestions for researchers to successfully keep up with adolescent and young adult participants during the pandemic, especially in alcohol and substance use studies. Doing so is our best chance of reducing problematic alcohol and substance use during and after the pandemic. "

    Why did you decide to publish open access?

    "Because this topic was related to the COVID-19 pandemic and could have global implications, it was critical to publish in open access. This open format of publishing allows researchers worldwide to read our paper and benefit from the suggestions, which in turn can help save lives from problematic substance use. Also, a component of the article involves increasing diversity, access, and inclusion. Researchers from less affluent countries often cannot gain access to papers, which was another reason that open access was vital for us. With open access, any researcher could access our article and apply the recommendations."

    What advice do you have for others who want to publish open access?
     
    "If others want to publish in open access journals, they should seek peer-review journals with an impact factor and reputable publishing practices."

    Randall Library will be spotlighting authors who've received our funding to publish in open access journals all week long! Find more information about our full slate of OA Week 2021 events here: https://lib.uncw.edu/OAWeek2021
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  • Posted: October 26, 2021
    Open Access Week 2021: Author Spotlight #2

    OA Fund Recipient Spotlight: Brock Ternes, Dept of Sociology and Criminology

    Dr Ternes's article, Technological Spaces in the Semi-Arid High Plains: Examining Well Ownership and Investment in Water-Saving Appliances, was published in the open access journal Water. Read it here: https://doi.org/10.3390/w13030365 

    Research summary from the authors:

    "Around the planet, groundwater supplies face precipitous declines. As global warming intensifies droughts, the diminishment of aquifers (underground reservoirs of freshwater) will continue to create water shortages. In his article, “Technological Spaces in the Semi-Arid High Plains,” Brock Ternes explores how owning a private water well changes the relationships between awareness of water supplies and the use of water-saving devices. He finds that well owners and those with higher awareness of water supplies are more likely own water-saving appliances than non-well owners and those with lower awareness levels.  As climate becomes less predictable, communities prone to drought must acquire a precise understanding of the public’s utilization of water-saving technologies to prepare for a new hydrologic reality defined by more frequent and intense water shortages."

    Why did you decide to publish open access?

    "The journal Water publishes peer-reviewed manuscripts on water science, technology, and water resource management. It is free for readers and offers its authors high visibility and wide recognition across a multitude of fields. When I was writing my manuscript, Water put out a call for manuscripts for a Special Issue, “Advances in Ecohydrology for Water Resources Optimization in Arid and Semi-arid Areas.” I felt that my research would be right at home in that issue, so I immediately got to work. Days later, Randall Library announced its pilot program to reimburse UNCW researchers who publish in Open Access Journals. Water’s special issue deadlines and the availability of Open Access Publishing funds coincided perfectly and the timing simply couldn’t have been better."

    What advice do you have for others who want to publish open access?

    "Many open access journals offer rapid publication. Thanks to the responsiveness of the editors, reviewers, and typesetters, my manuscript was published online five weeks after submitting it. The revise-and-resubmit deadlines were very strict and demanding. Be ready for an intense, brisk R&R stage. If you can clear your calendar and totally prioritize the manuscript, you can get your contributions published and widely distributed with breakneck speed."  

    Randall Library will be spotlighting authors who've received our funding to publish in open access journals all week long! Find more information about our full slate of OA Week 2021 events here: https://lib.uncw.edu/OAWeek2021
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  • Posted: October 25, 2021
    Open Access Week 2021: ORCID ID Virtual Sign Up

    It's Open Access Week! Take control of your scholarly presence, create a record of your work, and get your very own academic fingerprint by registering for an ORCID ID. Sign up for librarian-assisted registration on Tuesday or Friday at https://lib.uncw.edu/ORCID

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  • Posted: October 25, 2021
    Open Access Week 2021: Author Spotlight #1 Remote Sensing

    OA Fund Recipient Spotlight: Frederick Bingham, Dept of Physics and Physical Oceanography

    Dr Bingham's article, Sea Surface Salinity Seasonal Variability in the Tropics from Satellites, Gridded In Situ Products and Mooring Observations, was published in the open access journal Remote Sensing. Read it here: https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13010110 

    Research summary from the authors:

    "Surface salinity in the ocean (SSS) is an essential variable for understanding the climate and the global transport of fresh water. It has been measured by satellite for the past decade by a series of three missions launched by NASA and the European Space Agency. When a variable is measured by satellite like that, it is very important to validate the data it returns. Validation involves comparing the values the satellite measures with some kind of ground truth measurement. This has been done in a variety of ways for these missions. Across the tropical oceans there is deployed a vast array of buoys (123 of them!) that measure SSS on an hourly basis. The record lengths vary, but some of them are longer than 20 years. These buoys have been used as ground truth for SSS validation in a number of studies. What the present study has done is to utilize the length of the records to determine the seasonal ups and downs of SSS, and compare them to what the satellites measure. This involves determining from each measurement system on average which months have the highest or lowest SSS and what the range between highest and lowest is. We then compare these quantities between the buoys and satellites to understand which satellite systems are most accurate on a seasonal time scale."

    Why did you decide to publish open access?

    "I decided to publish this in an open access journal because it gives me the greatest reach, and allows the most people to read it without any barriers."

    What advice do you have for others who want to publish open access?

    "For those who thinking about publishing in an open access journal, I would advise them to go ahead. Depending on the field, it can be more expensive, though, so you may have to budget funds for it."

    Randall Library will be spotlighting authors who've received our funding to publish in open access journals all week long! Find more information about our OA Week 2021 events here: https://lib.uncw.edu/OAWeek2021
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  • Posted: October 21, 2021
    Open Access Week 2021 10/25-10/29

    Join us in celebrating Open Access Week 2021 at Randall Library! All week long, we'll be spotlighting UNCW faculty who have used the library's Open Access Fund to help them publish in open journals. You can register for a spot at the ORCID signup tables on Tuesday and Friday at https://lib.uncw.edu/ORCID. And don't forget to register for our Friday talk hosted by Drs Mike Maume and Jake Day, to learn more about open data resources in social science: https://lib.uncw.edu/canon-of-worms-OA2021  Find all the details here: https://lib.uncw.edu/OAWeek2021

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  • Posted: October 18, 2021
    orange and black background with four pumpkins wearing mask with the caption Happy Halloween Check out these Halloween titles

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