A blog from Special Collections and University Archives


Posted: November 06, 2015

Sammy C. Hawk stopped by the Midnite Madness exhibit to say hi and take a few photos!

  

 

The new exhibit at Randall Library by University Archives now has a new component.  Take a short 7 question quiz about the information in the exhibit, enter your name at the end (optional) and be entered to win a UNCW themed prize.  This quiz can be answered multiple different ways, depending on the amount of time you have.

 

Find the quiz here!

http://library.uncw.edu/archives_special/forms/midnight-madness-quiz

 

By visiting the exhibit in person, you will be able to find all the information on the quiz in text boxes and captions.

 

You can also view the online exhibit here and find the answers: http://library.uncw.edu/archives_special/exhibits/seahawks-after-dark-evolution-midnite-madness

 

You can also watch a short video, roughly 2.5 minutes long, that will also give you all the information you need to answer the quiz.

 

 

 

Posted: October 16, 2015

A new exhibit about Midnite Madness at the University of North Carolina Wilmington is now on display in the library during operating hours. Check out "Seahawks After Dark" in an exhibit case adjacent to University Archives, Randall Library Room 2008, in between Honors College and University Archives.

   

Midnite Madness honors the start of the UNCW basketball season, and is typically held on a Friday in mid-October. Historically, basketball players could not legally take the court to train until the Friday closest to the 15th of October. This led many schools to start practice soon after midnight on the appointed day to get as much practice time as possible. UNCW held its first Midnight Madness event in 1990. Over the years, and with a couple of rule changes, a name change from "Midnight" to "Midnite," and the addition of other campus wide events, Midnite Madness has evolved to become a week-long celebration for both men's and women's basketball.

 

This exhibit showcases historic photographs of former basketball players and the student body, as well as tangible items portraying Seahawk Spirit. Images of the first flyer advertising the event from the student-run newspaper The Seahawk can be seen along-side flyers from more recent years. The exhibit also displays Midnite Madness t-shirts, one dating to 1998 and others that current students will recognize from past years. The exhibit even shows historic images of the UNCW mascot in its early form, visible on a Student Telephone Directory from the 1989-1990 school year and the "new" logo unvieled in The Seahawk newspaper in 1986.

  

 

Midnite Madness 2015 is on Friday, October 23 with festivities all week. For more information on Midnite Madness, see http://www.uncwsports.com/index.aspx?path=mbball

To view a digital exhibit, see

http://library.uncw.edu/archives_special/exhibits/seahawks-after-dark-evolution-midnite-madness.

 

 

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Posted: February 13, 2015
University Archives worked together with the Honors College to curate an exhibit on the history of Honors at UNCW. The Honors College is currently celebrating two anniversaries: 50 years of Departmental Honors and 20 years of the Honors Scholars Program. Drawing on materials from the Honors College and University Archives documents and artifacts, the exhibit traces the path of honors from Departmental Honors to the Honors Scholars Program to the Honors College of today. 
 
Title banner for Honors College Exhibit: Celebrating Honors College    Graduate Assistant Beth Bullock standing next to the Honors exhibit.
 
Departmental Honors began in 1965, allowing seniors to undertake a yearlong thesis project and graduate “with honors” in their major. In 1994, the Honors Scholars Program was initiated. This program offered an option for students to take part in a four-year honors curriculum and graduate with university honors. In 2011, the Honors Scholars Program was renamed the Honors College to honor its growth and success.
 
 
The exhibit showcases major milestones in the history of Honors, displaying the first thesis, completed in 1965 by Phyllis Boyles; a photo of the first graduate of the 4-year program, Nicholas Allen; and a program from the 2011 dedication of the Honors College. The exhibit also illuminates the wide variety of activities and opportunities the Honors College has sponsored over the years, including research conferences and journals, honors student trips, an award-winning newsletter, and other publications. The exhibit also highlights a few honors students who are now current faculty members, such as Dr. Tom Lankford and Dr. Julian Keith. 
 
Track Team photo from 1983 Fledgling yearbook. Photo includes two honors students, Tom Lankford and Julian Keith.
 
The exhibit will be on display over homecoming weekend and will remain on display through graduation. For more on the Honors College’s anniversaries and homecoming activities visit their website: http://uncw.edu/honors/honors5020.html
 
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Posted: December 08, 2014

 

Archives  Collections: A to Z

Disclaimer: This is not a Records Schedule, which is a much more detailed listing of materials in a University Archives, categorized by function or department. Rather, the purpose of this A-Z list is to identify some of the basic must-haves in Archives.

A

  • Accreditation/self-study reports
  • Admissions guides, bulletins, brochures
  • Alumni magazines and directories
  • Anniversary celebrations - planning materials, publicity, brochures, event information, scrapbooks.
  • Annual reports by offices, units, departments, divisions, college/school, and Chancellor
  • Apparel - see Textiles
  • Architectural plans/designs/blueprints/drawings
  • Area studies/campus studies/traffic studies
  • Art exhibition guides
  • Athletics - programs, news releases, guides, schedules, reports, correspondence, photographs, videos
  • Audit reports
  • Awardee information - biographical information, news releases, and announcements pertaining to faculty, staff, students, and alumni awards
  • Awards and certificates for the university and its departments

B

  • Benchmark Studies
  • BIG (Brand Identity Guide)
  • Board of Trustees – minutes, correspondence, oaths of office, biographical data, official photos, rosters, Executive Committee minutes, commitee minutes and reports
  • Board of Visitors - minutes, rosters, executive committee minutes, committee reports
  • Books, serials, journals, newspapers, and magazines not published by UNCW, but exclusively for or about UNCW
  • Books, serials, journals, newspapers, and magazines published by UNCW, its departments, student organizations or classes
  • Budget reports (official, annual)
  • Business Week programs

C

  • Calendars of Events
  • Camps and youth programs - brochures, guides, policies, reports
  • Campus Crime Awareness and Security Act Reports (annual)
  • Capital Improvements – architect’s proposals, change orders, budget reports.
  • Codes of Student Life/Student Handbooks (annual)
  • Common Data Set
  • Commencement programs, videos, photographs, and speeches
  • Committees and task forces of faculty, staff, and students - minutes, reports, charge, accomplishments
  • Conference programs for university-initiated or sponsored conferences or workshops
  • Contracts (selected)
  • Convocation programs, videos, photoraphs, and speeches
  • Core values
  • Course catalogs
  • Course schedules
  • Cultural activities – brochures, reports, videos
  • Curriculum – committee reports, University Studies reports, updates, news

D

  • Donors – Report of
  • Directory information (student public records formerly published in telephone directories)
  • Directories, miscellaneous (department and school)
  • Directories of Club Sports teams
  • Directories of Student Organization
  • Deans Council - minutes, committee reports, charges

E

  • Equal Employment Opportunity /Affirmative Action Plan (HR)
  • "External Programs" - programs, course descriptions, workshop descriptions for continuing studies

F

  • Faculty Senate minutes, announcements, motions, correspondence, and committee minutes, reports, etc.
  • Factsheets/IPEDS data
  • Financial reports (annual)
  • Foundational documents such as charters, certificates of establishment, acts of legislation central to university development, etc.
  • Friends of UNCW – Annual Reports, minutes, committee reports

G

  • Governance - see Staff Senate, Faculty Senate, Student Government Association, Graduate Student Association
  • Graduate Council - minutes, announcements, motions, correspondence, executive committee minutes, etc.
  • Graduate theses
  • Grants, Awarded. Final reports, statistics of grants activity, proposals.
  • Graduate Student Association - minutes, correspondence, motions, reports, committee charges and accomplishments
  • Groundbreakings and Openings of Buildings  - programs, photographs, announcements, news releases, videos, news articles
  • Guidelines for Publications
  • Guides to Financial Aid

H

  • Handbooks - Faculty
  • Handbooks - Student Organizations
  • Histories of campus and departments
  • Honor Codes
  • Honorary societies - minutes, correspondence, reports, newsletters
  • Honors Papers
  • Housing – Guide to

I

  • Installation, Chancellor. Programs, speeches, event listings, articles, photographs, videos
  • Inventory of Fixed Assets

J

  • Judicial procedures for student conduct

 

K

  • Knowledge production - Copyright registration by UNCW and applications after expiration of copyright; Patent awards, applications, and notice of awards after expiration

L

  • Legal - selected agreements, consent decrees, memoranda of understanding, deeds of sale of university property, etc.
  • Legislation - Acts passed by NC General Assembly
  • Literary and art magazines
  • Long-Range Plans

M

  • Maps
  • Master Plans
  • Memorabilia, historical
  • Mission Statement

N

  • New Faculty and Staff - directories and profiles
  • News articles, editorials, and columns about UNCW from local, statewide, national, and international media organizations
  • News releases
  • Newsletters

O

  • On Campus Living – Guide to
  • Off Campus Living – Guide to
  • Oral Histories - Faculty, Students, Staff, Trustees (including retired)
  • Orientation Guides

P

  • Parents, Guide for
  • Performances - videos, photographs
  • Personnel records (faculty and staff) (selected, after a waiting period)
  • Photographs (University Relations)
  • Planning, Univearsity - correspondence, reports, statistics
  • Policies and Procedures – UNCW
  • Progress Measures Reports
  • Programs - Kenan Auditorium, Department of Music, Department of Theatre, Department of Art
  • Proposals to Establish New Degree Programs
  • Publications, Campus

Q

  • Quality Enhancement Plan
  • Questionnaires - Summary reports and conclusions from student, staff, and faculty surveys

R

  • Razor Walker Awards programs - Watson College of Education
  • Reports prepared for Board of Governors or UNC System President (i.e. UNC Tomorrow)
  • Research / faculty scholarship / student scholarship / creative works by faculty and students (collecting in these areas is coordinated by library with participation of Archives)

S

  • Salary increases and compensation for faculty faculty-reports
  • Scholarships - announcements, names of recipients, acknowledgments of gifts, photographs
  • Scrapbooks
  • Senior Sankofa programs and vidoes - Upperman Center
  • Service Awards luncheons programs and videos
  • Service Learning - eTEAL courses, programs, mission, reports, studies
  • Speeches by chancellor, provost, and senior staff
  • Staff Senate-minutes, announcements, motions, correspondence, reports and committee minutes, reports, etc.
  • Strategic Plans
  • Student Government Association-minutes, announcements, motions, correspondence, reports and committees minutes, announcements, motions, correspondence, reports, charge, accomplishments
  • Student Organization Directories for registered student organizations
  • Student Services - programs, photographs, reports, policies
  • Study Abroad - programs, reports, brochures, posters, photographs
  • Summer School - catalogs, course listings, publications, publicity, special events
  • Synergy – first-year student common read book is collected annually

T

  • Teaching - Blackboard courses, etc.
  • Textiles significant to UNCW-quilts, robes, hoods
  • Telephone directories
  • Timelines
  • Transfer Guides

U

  • UNCW Foundation - Annual Reports, minutes, committee reports
  • University Advancment - Records and statistics for major gifts and inactive endowments
  • University code

V

  • Videos (promotional/Utube/Sports/UNCW Presents/ UNCW Media programming
  • Vision Statement
  • Visual Oral Histories - videotaped oral history recordings. See Oral Histories.

W

  • Works of art reflecting UNCW

X

  • Xeroxed copies (or photocopies) may be acceptable for certain materials, such as final reports and approved minutes. We will want to note where signed originals are permanently kept if Archives maintains photocoopies.

Y

  • Yearbooks

Z

  • Zip discs, floppy disks, cdroms, and other obsolete media. We will work with you on retrieving data from these obsolete media if the information contained on it fit our collecting criteria.
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Posted: November 13, 2014

Brochure with map of the preserve     Front of a brochure for the preserve

A recent research request sent in to University Archives involved the university’s history of land use and property transactions. The Bluethenthal Wildflower Preserve represents one way the university has made use of campus land. This month marks 40 years since the Bluethenthal Wildflower Preserve was dedicated on November 8, 1974. Named for Herbert Bluethenthal, the preserve began with a donation from Mrs. Bleuthenthal in honor of her late husband, a Wilmington native who died in World War I. After her donation in 1973 the university set aside about 10 acres of land behind Hoggard Hall and near the university’s existing nature trail. New trails were created in order to grant easy access to areas that included excellent examples of the native flora of Southeastern North Carolina.  The preserve has been further developed over the years to offer the best examples of unique plants of the region.

The dedication ceremony featured the unveiling of the memorial to Herbert Bluethenthal by Mrs. Bleuthenthal as well as the presentation of a monument honoring the contributions to botany by Dr. Bertram Wells, a noted botanist who worked in North Carolina for much of his career. Both Dr. Wells and Mrs. Bleuthenthal were honored guests at the dedication.

The preserve is intended for use both by the public as well as students in fields such as biology. The University Archives has a range of materials about Bluethenthal Wildflower Preserve and the dedication including photos, brochures, Seahawk newspaper articles, and newspaper clippings in the university’s annual scrapbooks.

2014 photo of Bluethenthal Memorial  2014 photo of bench area in Bluethenthal Preserve

Further Resources from Archives: 

Bluethenthal Preserve Brochures

The Seahawk, November 20, 1974

More Photos from the Dedication Ceremony

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Posted: September 16, 2014

Lauren Love is an intern working in Special Collections


Recently, we’ve acquired the personal papers of Dr. Walter Conser, a professor of Religious Studies and History here at UNCW. Spanning his career to date, this collection includes materials related to the research of Dr. Conser’s various interests including the religion and history of the Southeast, Native American studies, nonviolence and civilian-based defense.

A collection of nonviolence pamphlets written by Gene Sharp

 

Within the personal papers of Dr. Conser are a collection of nonviolence pamphlets written by Gene Sharp. These along with a small assortment of vinyl records from the 1960s are part of a series of nonviolence related materials included in this collection.
 

Presently, the collection is being assessed and rehoused. By the end of the semester there will be a searchable Finding Aid for researchers to use on our website.
 

Many of the books Dr. Conser has worked on as a contributor, author, and/or editor can be found in the Randall Library General Collection.

 

 

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Posted: August 25, 2014

Exhibit Opening, Panel Presentation and Reception

Randall Library Auditorium, RL2047

This exhibit from University Archives invites visitors to witness UNCW’s evolution, stunning accomplishments, and shining role in higher education since 1947.

Wilmington College students enrolled in technical courses such as masonry, drafting, and air conditioning and refrigeration. When the college achieved university status and joined the UNC system in 1969, the chancellor declared

The University of North Carolina is a magnificent system of higher education institutions located throughout the state, but the University of North Carolina at Wilmington is the jewel in this education crown.

--William H. Wagoner
President, Wilmington College, 1968-1969
Chancellor, the University of North Carolina Wilmington, 1969-1990

 

Guest Speakers:

Dorothy Powell Marshall, faculty member and registrar at Wilmington College and UNCW, 1949-1992

Bertha Todd, Williston College Librarian

Ty Rowell, Former UNCW Vice Chancellor for University Advancement

Adina Riggins (Moderator) University Archivist

The Jewel in the Crown will be in Special Collections at Randall Library through December 3, 2014.

The Jewel in the Crown: The University of North Carolina Wilmington

A Journey and Legacy

 

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Posted: July 31, 2014

Lauren Love is an intern working in Special Collections


July 28th marked the 100th year since the start of WWI. Selected items from the war years held at the UNCW Randall Library Special Collections will be highlighted in this blog post. For information about additional collections and books relating to WWI please browse the Special Collections and UNCW Archives website.

Harmon C. Rorison Private Papers, 1903 - 1976
 

A banker in peace times, Harmon C. Rorison grew up in Wilmington and was a veteran of WWI, the Russian-Polish war, and WWII. This collection (MS 17) includes riveting correspondence sent home by Rorison while he was in the Kosciuszko Squadron fighting against the Bolshiviks. Below is a scanned image of a newspaper from the day WWI officially ended.

The Wilmington Dispatch - November 11, 1918 - Great War is Ended Today
                                                                  The Wilmington Dispatch Front Page - November 11, 1918


 

TAPS: Selected Poems of the Great War (1932) 

Compiled by Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. and Grantland Rice this work includes a small amount of illustrations by Captain John Thomason. Taps is part of our rare book collection and is in excellent condition. The poems within are written by mothers, lovers, soldiers and fathers; they shed light on the emotional state of the various peoples touched by WWI.

                                  

Front of TAPS by Roosevelt and Rice                   Dreamers

Soldiers are citizens of death's gray land,
     Drawing no dividend from time's to-morrows.
In the great hour of destiny they stand,
     Each with his feuds, and jealousies, and sorrows.
Soldiers are sworn to action; they must win
     Some flaming, fatal climax with their lives.
Soldiers are dreamers; when the guns begin
     They think of firelit homes, clean beds, and wives.

I see them in foul dug-outs, gnawed by rats
     And in the ruined trenches, lashed with rain,
Dreaming of things they did with balls and bats,
     And mocked by hopeless longing to regain
Bank-holidays, and picture shows, and spats,
     And going to the office in the train.
                                               

              Siegfried Sassoon

 

 

                       No Man's LandIllustration by Captain John Thomason for No Man's Land

                    No Man's Land is an eerie sight                   
                    At early dawn in the pale gray light.
                    Never a house and never a hedge
                    In No Man's Land from edge to edge,

                    And never a living soul walks there
                    To taste the fresh of the morning air;-
                    Only some lumps of rotting clay,
                    That were friends or foemen yesterday.
                    What are the bounds of No Man's Land?
                    You can see them clearly on either hand,
                    A mount of rag-b ags gray in the sun,
                    Or a furrow of brown where the earthworks run

                    From the eastern hills to the western sea
                    Through field or forest o'er river and lea; 
                    No man may pass them, but aim you well
                    And Death rides across on the bullet or shell

                    But No Man's Land is a goblin sight
                    When Patrols crawl over at dead o'night;
                    Boche or British, Belgian or French,
                    You dice with Death when you cross the trench.
                    When the "rapid," like fireflies in the dark,
                    Flits down the parapet spark by spark,
                    And you drop for cover to keep your head
                   With your face on the breast of the four months' dead.

                   The man who ranges in No Man's Land
                   Is dogged by the shadows on either hand
                   When the star-shell's flare, as it bursts o'erhead,
                   Scares the gray rats that feed on the dead,
                   And the bursting bomb or the bayonet-snatch
                   May answer the click of your safety-catch,
                   For the lone patrol, with the life in his hand,
                   Is hunting for blood in No Man's Land.

                                     James H. Knight-Adkin


 

Sidney Gardner MacMillan Private Papers, 1918-1919

For any student or researcher interested in WWI, the correspondence of Sidney G. MacMillan are a worthy investigation. His letters detail the daily life of an American soldier during the last years of the war and are very detailed and beautifully written. Included in the collection are five postcards from France, two of which are shown below.

 

Côte-d'Or  -  Quemigny-sur-Seine  -  Cascade de la RocheCôte-d'Or  -  Pothières  -  Le Château


 

The Yellow Dog (1918) 

A  story of fiction filled with the rhetoric of war and patriotism, this book was written by Henry Irving Dodge and published in 1918. 

 

Dust jacket of The Yellow Dog by Henry Irving Dodge


 

Colored Soldiers by W. Irwin MacIntyre

A collection of first hand accounts from African American soldiers during the war written in the vernacular of those telling the stories. Some of the accounts are humorous while others shed light on what the war years were like for some of America's non-white population.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Sources can be accessed by visiting Randall Library Special Collections:
  • Dodge, Henry Irving. The Yellow Dog. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1918. Print.
  • Harmon C. Rorison Private Papers, 1903-1976. Special Collections and Archives, Randall Library, University of North Carolina at Wilmington.
  • MacIntyre, William Irwin. Colored Soldiers. Macon: The J.W. Burke Company, 1923. Print.
  • Roosevelt Jr., Theodore, and Grantland Rice. TAPS: Selected Poems of the Great War. New York: Doubleday, Doran & Company Inc., 1932. Print.
  • Sidney Gardner MacMillan Private Papers, 1918-1919. Special Collections and Archives, Randall Library, University of North Carolina at Wilmington.
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Posted: May 28, 2014

 

Lauren Love is an intern working in Special Collections.


While reformatting the finding aid for the collection of St. Andrews Covenant Presbyterian Church (also known as MS 180) an excellent piece of Wilmington art history was spotted. The small booklet from 1943 was created for “An Artistic Banquet” held at the Church of the Covenant just before it was merged with St. Andrews in 1944.

Twenty Fifth Anniversary Celebration booklet published 1943

                                                    The Church of the Covenant

Before I continue, allow me to introduce myself: my name is Lauren Love and this summer I am interning in the Special Collections department of UNCW Randall Library. So far I have been buried, nose first, in MS 180 only briefly coming up for air to help move furniture and prepare for spring cleaning project which has taken over our domain (more on that in the future!).

Front cover of An Artistic BanquetBack page of An Artistic Banquet pamphlet

Initially I was struck by the hand painted illustration on the cover of the booklet whose colors contrasted so sharply with the stale yellow of ageing paper. To satisfy my curiosity, I brought the find to my supervisor, Rebecca Baugnon. “Claude Howell!” she said excitedly after flipping through to the last page; “Claude Howell?!” came the voice of Jerry Parnell, the Special Collections Coordinator from across the hall. One can imagine how my interest peeked at such reactions. Upon further inspection we found that the pamphlet was an itinerary of sorts for an educational art program where lessons in painting, watercolor, drawing and much more were offered to attendees. The investigation became an eye opening revelation about the history of Art culture in Wilmington and how, unbeknownst to me, I held in my hands a small booklet which contained the names of some local art heroes.

                   Irene Price 1930s, photograph from Two Centuries of Art in New Hanover County
                                                                  
by Crockette W. Hewlett

Unassumingly printed are the names of Peggy Hall, Claude Howell, Rosalie Oliver and Winona Gration. The details of how these artists contributed to the booklet is unknown but further research proved that they were students together under Irene Price and Delbert Palmer. Price was a friend of Elisabeth Augusta Chant who is partially responsible for encouraging and cultivating the art scene in Wilmington. Chant and Price both taught art classes in downtown Wilmington during the 1930s and went on to found and direct various programs and institutions while maintaining connections with some of the artists listed above. Simple though it may appear, the booklet shows the efforts of these budding artists to work with the community to foster a love of arts which we still see in our port city today.

Peggy Hall and students Claude Howell

                                                Peggy Hall with students 1941 (left), and Claude Howell (right)
                               Photographs from Two Centuries of Art in New Hanover County by Crockette W. Hewlett

Peggy Hall studied under Price and Chant and went on to become the director of the Wilmington Museum of Art, a museum which opened in 1940 and before World War II came to a close. She exhibited her work around the country and possessed a passion for art throughout her life.

Claude Howell would become a very influential artist who taught at UNCW and played a large role in the establishment of the Art Department. Some of his paintings are located on the first floor of the library near Port City Java and a beautiful collection of illustrated holiday cards are housed in the Special Collections Library upstairs.

Rosalie Oliver taught and spoke at the Wilmington Museum of Art.

Unfortunately I could not find any information on Winona Gration.


For more information come ask us about the following collections:
MS 063 – A Balkan Sketchbook by Claude Howell
MS 076 – Claude Howell – Classification of Art Prints
MS 326 – Claude Howell Christmas Cards

For a truly enlightening exploration of art in Wilmington read Two Centuries of Art in New Hanover County by Crockette W. Hewlett, both the pictures used in this blog post as well as the biographical information are from this thorough and entertaining book. 

Sources can be accessed by visiting Randall Library and the Special Collections Library therein:

  • An Artistic Banquet. Wilmington:  Church of the Covenant, 1943. Print. Box 10, Folder 3. St. Andrews Covenant Presbyterian Church Collection. Randall Library Special Collections, University of North Carolina Wilmington, Wilmington, NC. May 21, 2014.
  • Hewlett, Crockette W.. Two Centuries of Art in New Hanover County. Durham: Moore Publishing Company, 1976. Print.
  • Twenty Fifth Anniversary Celebration. Wilmington: Church of the Covenant, 1943. Print. Box 10, Folder 3. St. Andrews Covenant Presbyterian Church Collection. Randall Library Special Collections, University of North Carolina Wilmington, Wilmington, NC. May 21, 2014. 

 

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Posted: May 06, 2014

University Archives student assistant cleans stone replica from collection. Photo by University Archives / UNCWUniversity Archives student assistant cleans item from collection. Photo by University Archives / UNCW.

April 27-May 3, 2014 was American Library Association Preservation Week and May is Preservation Month with loads of great information from the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

What are we doing in University Archives to raise preservation awareness? On this blog throughout May, we will share best practices to extend the life of our rare and unique collections in the University Archives, Randall Library, University of North Carolina Wilmington.

Preservation--also known as “preventive conservation”--emphasizes noninterventive actions to prevent damage to and minimize deterioration of a museum object or archival collection.

For example:

  • Monitoring and recording environmental conditions where collections are housed (e.g., light, relative humidity, temperature, and air pollution)
  • Inspecting and recording the condition of objects
  • Practicing proper handling, storage, exhibit, housekeeping, and packing and shipping techniques

Taj Mahal model in University Archives. These replicas are made in various sizes.  The one in Archives has a base of 9 in. by 9 in.

Taj Mahal model in University Archives. These models are made in various sizes.  This one in Archives has a base of 9 in. by 9 in.

In University Archives, we rely on our excellent student assistants to take on essential preservation and collection care responsibilities.

Allison Thompson, Archives student assistant, wore cotton gloves while carefully cleaning the soapstone  model. First she dry-brushed the item with a fine brush from a collection care kit and then cleaned it with plain water using a similar brush.

For storage, she fabricated custom archival boxes and lids from ArtCareTM 100 percent cotton mat board. Boxes made of this material help create a safe “microchamber” for archival and museum objects.

 

Protective boxes in University Archives for storage of objects.

 

This Taj Mahal mini-replica was a gift to former James Leutze upon his retirement in 2003. He donated it to University Archives at that time. Chancellor Leutze, a historian, was host of the UNC Television series Globewatch and an often-sought speaker on international issues.

Chancellor James Leutze (2007). Photo by UNCW University Relations.
Chancellor James R. Leutze (2007). Photo by UNCW University Relations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reference

Knapp, A. M. (1993, July). Preservation of museum collections. Conserv O Gram, 1(1), 1-2. Retrieved from http://www.cr.nps.gov/museum/publications/conserveogram/01-01.pdf.   

 

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