Information Literacy Faculty Fellows Projects

Submit your project here.

An Honors College undergraduate eminar course, HON120, entitled "Modern Biotechnology: Research and Careers"
Ying Wang
College of Arts and Sciences
Chemistry and Biochemistry
The goal of this project is to design a one-credit hour course to introduce modern biotechnology to the undergraduate students from the Honors College of UNCW. It is often challenging to choose materials for traditional lectures in an introductory biotechnology course. Biotechnology is highly inter-disciplinary by nature, involved in a broad spectrum of research areas and applications, and characterized with fast-evolving technology development. In addition, the HON120 classes are constituted of students at all levels from freshmen to seniors with very different background knowledge. The information literacy framework helps to solve the existing challenges in this course. In this project, the course is designed to facilitate student-driven and research-based learning. The course design emphasizes all six frames of information literacy and the students' metaliterate learner roles in their research project.
  • First-year students
  • Upper-division undergraduates
  • Assignment
  • Syllabus
  • Teaching plan
  • Rubric
  • Course design
  • Authority is Constructed and Contextual
  • Information Creation as a Process
  • Information Has Value
  • Research as Inquiry
  • Searching as Strategic Exploration
  • Scholarship as Conversation
HST 444/526 Scaffolded Research Project
Angie Zombek
College of Arts and Sciences
History
This multi-step research project guides students through topic selection, identifying reputable primary and secondary sources, the process of writing a first draft, and revising the draft into a final paper by incorporating feedback and engaging in self-reflection.
  • Upper-division undergraduates
  • Graduate students
Assignment
  • Authority is Constructed and Contextual
  • Information Creation as a Process
  • Information Has Value
  • Research as Inquiry
  • Searching as Strategic Exploration
  • Scholarship as Conversation
Assignment: Developing Research Questions From Periodical Archives
Elizabeth Wellman
College of Arts and Sciences
Theatre
Designed for new course, Women in Theatre, a seminar focused on cultural studies, history, and literature. Could be modified for use in range of courses with research focus. Includes assignment description and justification, instructions, goals, SLOs for assignment aligned with new IL SLOs proposed for implementation in Fall 2021, and a proposed assessment tool.

For this assignment, students are asked to choose a woman artist whose work is performed on stage (with whom they are unfamiliar) featured in an issue of The Billboard. Using The Billboard online archive only, they must find, read, and analyze a minimum of ten different articles or references to this artist. Each reference should come from a different published issue. Each reference should be quoted, cited, and explained in the style of an annotated bibliography. Using these ten sources, the student should then construct a 1-2 paragraph summary of this performer using only information from those sources (no additional Googling, searches, reading allowed). This will require students to make educated guesses and inferences based on context within the periodical and prior knowledge only. Finally, each student will compile a list of questions they were not able to answer solely based on The Billboard articles. What words, ideas, slang were unfamiliar? What did they want to look up? Where would they go to find that information? What would have helped them to understand the context? What gaps do they see in the report they were able to construct? What kinds of information does reading The Billboard offer and what kinds of information can it not offer?

The goal of this assignment is to encourage students to see themselves as researchers, rather than re-iterators, of knowledge. It also strengthens their understanding of the ways in which strong research questions can be formed, as opposed to constructed in advance of the actual beginning of the process.*

*Full assignment details available in attached document

Upper-division undergraduates
Assignment
  • Authority is Constructed and Contextual
  • Research as Inquiry
  • Searching as Strategic Exploration
Identifying connections and themes when synthesizing research literature (Assignment #9 - SWK321)
Kolbe, Athena R.
College of Health and Human Services
Social Work
Students engage in a multi-stage process of identifying connections between sources, reflecting on their understanding of the scholarly discourse around a given topic, and grouping sources into themes before writing draft of part of their literature review that synthesizes the literature in each theme.
  • Upper-division undergraduates
  • Distance learners
Assignment
  • Research as Inquiry
  • Searching as Strategic Exploration
  • Scholarship as Conversation
Health Issues: Tracing the Story Backwards
Jones, Lindsey
College of Health and Human Services
School of Nursing
For this assignment, students will find a health-related story in the news or media. They will then trace that story backwards by searching for peer-reviewed journal articles, scientific studies, etc. The purpose of this activity is to encourage students to compare the information from the original research/study with the mainstream media presentation and reflect on how the knowledge gained through this process can translate to their professional nursing practice. I am also embedding a librarian discussion board and several videos/tutorials to help students understand and utilize resources that will help them meet the information literacy objectives.
  • Upper-division undergraduates
  • Distance learners
Assignment
  • Authority is Constructed and Contextual
  • Information Creation as a Process
  • Information Has Value
  • Research as Inquiry
  • Searching as Strategic Exploration
Scholar(ly) Research and Entering the Conversation
Parker, Noelle
College of Arts and Sciences
English
This project is intended for ENG 103 or ENG 201 students. The goal is to encourage students to think more critically about not only the scholarly works they may use in a research paper, but also how the scholars themselves are part of the conversation. Students are familiar with discussing source credibility of popular sources (looking at “About Us” pages, discussing the author’s blurb in the tagline, etc.) but they rarely examine the authors of scholarly articles because the article is peer-reviewed. I am not downplaying the peer review process, but I want students to think more critically about the author’s research interests and other publications as well as the journal itself to provide a more comprehensive look at how his/her/their work fits into the conversation.
  • First-year students
  • Upper-division undergraduates
  • Faculty
Assignment
  • Searching as Strategic Exploration
  • Scholarship as Conversation
Digital Literacy: Religion in Media for PAR 103 or PAR 225
Christopher J. Moreland
College of Arts and Sciences
Philosophy & Religion
https://spark.adobe.com/page/doyrHoYZqtnKW/

Students are asked to either:
I. Analyze a depiction of a real-world religion in media.
II. Analyze a depiction of a fictional religion in media.

Utilizing questions and prompts drawn from Digitial Literacy Methodology and Religious Studies Methodology. Students can analyze media in a bevy of forms, ranging from traditional texts to newer formats such as video games.
Upper-division undergraduates
Assignment
  • Authority is Constructed and Contextual
  • Information Creation as a Process
  • Information Has Value
  • Research as Inquiry
  • Searching as Strategic Exploration
  • Scholarship as Conversation
Teaching Elementary Students to Identify Misinformation and Misleading Graphs
Hargrove, Tracy
Watson College of Education
Early Childhood, Elementary, Middle, Literacy and Special Education
This project is designed to introduce pre-service teachers to methods for teaching K-6 students to evaluate information and resources that involve the use of data, particularly those involving misleading charts and graphs. Pre-service teachers are tasked with identifying charts in various media sources that include misleading representations of data and designing new charts that do not mislead. They are also asked to identify charts that do not appear to be misleading and design a new graph that purposely includes at least two misleading features discussed in class. Finally, students will create a lesson plan designed to introduce students in Grades K-5 to misinformation and/or misleading graphs.
  • Upper-division undergraduates
  • Graduate students
  • Assignment
  • Teaching plan
Authority is Constructed and Contextual
Archive.zip
CENSORED AMERICA: ARCHIVAL INVESTIGATION INTO THE HOLLYWOOD MOTION PICTURE PRODUCTION CODE
Tim Palmer
College of Arts and Sciences
Film Studies
FST 376: American Cinema 1927-1960 is a film history class, and fulfills the UNCW’s Information Literacy requirement, meaning that investigating primary documents is of vital significance to the practice of active film historians. Fortunately, UNCW students can access a large repository of scanned, primary documents related to classical Hollywood censorship files – some of the liveliest debates, oftentimes, in North American film production. From the scanned copies of actual archival documents, students engage with the historical process of actual film productions negotiating the mandatory censorship proceedings.

The key database is the Hollywood, Censorship, and the Motion Picture Production Code, 1927-1968 Database. It contains the letters between the Production Code Administration (PCA) and studios/filmmakers about individual scripts and films. The letters have been scanned from the collection of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ Margaret Herrick Library, one of the most important film archives in the USA. Although this database includes only a fraction of the Academy’s PCA files, it is a treasure trove.

From this point of departure, students will:

Write a report (5-6 pages) on the correspondence between a particular film studio and the Production Code Administration (PCA) regarding the production of a North American film released publicly between 1927 and 1960. Based on your case study, how did particular censorship protocols inform the production of your film? Key questions to engage in your report include: What agenda was brought to bear on its design? What factors of representation were flagged as problematic? What negotiation process ensued? What materials, in scripted form and actual on-set implementation, survived censorship? What materials were deleted and/or repressed? How do your documents reflect the authority exerted of the PCA over North American film production?

This assignment is designed to give you experience conducting archival research, dealing with primary texts, and understanding the process by which particular information texts constitute larger historical forces.
  • Upper-division undergraduates
  • Graduate students
  • Assignment
  • Syllabus
  • Course design
  • Authority is Constructed and Contextual
  • Research as Inquiry
  • Searching as Strategic Exploration
Decolonizing the Literature Review Assignment
Julia Morris
College of Arts and Sciences
International Studies
This assignment asks students to consider how higher education, research, and publishing can be complicit in producing particular representations surrounding where knowledge and power is located. It gives them a chance to ‘write back’ against these trends and engage in decolonizing and reclaiming the meanings of ‘academic scholarship,’ particularly in the context of Western research. Students are asked to complete the outline of a small-scale literature review on a topic of their choice through a mixture of ‘canonical’ and non-traditional sources. They then reflect on the existence of dominant discourses and the influence of dominant groups in what/who we research. Can 'mainstream' research be of value for the issues it raises, even when academics are removed from the communities they study? How can researchers ensure knowledge is shared in relevant representations? What should a decolonized research project look like?
Upper-division undergraduates
Assignment
  • Authority is Constructed and Contextual
  • Information Has Value
  • Scholarship as Conversation
From Searching to Researching
Crawford, Nicholas
Other
University Learning Center
My project aims to bridge the gap between academic research and the kinds of everyday searching we all do on a regular basis. The primary goal is to capitalize on students' motivation for everyday searching and to transpose that motivation into a more academic context.
Faculty
  • Assignment
  • Teaching plan
  • Research as Inquiry
  • Searching as Strategic Exploration
Information Literacy in Applied Social Research
Jennifer Vanderminden
College of Arts and Sciences
Sociology & Criminology
The focus of my IL fellows project is on authority is constructed and contextual in my SOC292 Applied Research course. This is a newly created course that is part of a larger initiative to incorporate community-based research across the sociology curriculum. This course is designed as a lower level introduction to applied research methods intended to get students involved in community-based research early in their college careers.

The students in SOC292 will be partnering with the Wilmington Police Department (WPD) to work on a community-based research project that focuses on social determinants of crime. The overarching goal of this community-based research project is to identify why the crime rate in one district in Wilmington is so much higher than others. The students will collect data and map community resources to overlay with crime data for that district to begin to address this research question. Through incorporating information literacy into this project, I hope to help students to identify and see the value in multiple sources of authority and how using multiple sources of data can answer important and relevant research questions and help create policy and social change.

Measurable objectives
Students should:
1) seek out multiple types of authority and be able to identify the strengths and limitations of each.
2) develop an appreciation for multiple sources and a curiosity for comparison through demonstrating the value in each different type of information
3) identify biases they hold and acknowledge how those biases impact how they interpret information
4) find traditional sources of authority on determinants of crime as well as non-traditional sources including information from community members, physical space, and existing documentation from police departments.

Activity
1. After providing a basic introduction to the class project, I will ask the students to define different types of authority related to the social determinants of crime (specifically in southeastern NC). I anticipate that they will identify the following: scholars, police officers, elected officials, business owners, community members, and those engaging in crime within the community.
a. After students have come up with their own lists in pairs we will share as a class and write a complete list on the board.
b. The complete list will inform the types of authority the students will use for their community-based research project.

2. After defining the different types of authority, I am going to have the students identify the types of information each type could potentially provide (e.g. first-hand account, crime data, etc.) and in what format (verbal account, newspapers, report, etc.).
a. Again, students will first do this in pairs and then share with the class, comparing what each of the groups came up with and the range in types of information available on the topic.
b. The results of this conversation will be integrated into the lectures on research methods and research designs throughout the semester and provide opportunities to revisit the different types of authority throughout the semester.

3. Students will then be asked to identify the best way to access this information
and have students identify interested parties that produce information on social determinants of crime. Students will be required to identify three interested parties that produce information on the social determinants of crime (in Wilmington or Southeastern NC) and then search for that information. They will document their search process and will discuss the process and what they have found in class.

Students will use information they’ve come up for each of these three exercises described above to construct report on what is known on social determinants of crime (from multiple sources of authority) and create a plan to gather additional information through mapping.

Assessment: I will use two forms of assessment for this project a reflection with prompts and a knowledge survey both before and after the exercises. The reflection will touch on knowledge practices but will mostly focus on dispositions while the knowledge survey will mostly address knowledge practices.

Example reflection prompts:
Think back to your beginning reflection and one of the goals of applied learning in the community: to gather information from different types of sources. We wanted you to learn to “question traditional notions of granting authority and recognize the value of diverse ideas and worldviews” (Association of College and Research Libraries 2016). Authority in this context means the information creators’ expertise and credibility. What did you learn from working directly with the Wilmington Police Department that is different from what you learned from academic sources? Why do you think those differences exist? (adapted from reflection prompt from Julia Waity, Spring 2020).

What can different sources of information be good for? For example, when would you use information from academic articles about social determinants of crime compared with the data you gathered from within Wilmington? (adapted from reflection prompt from Julia Waity, Spring 2020).

Looking back at prior courses and projects, can you identify ways in which you now think about authority differently now? Are there sources of authority that you feel are often left out of academic coursework?

In reconsidering bias, do you have a different understanding of bias? Are there ways in which you have identified how bias may impact how you and others interpret information?

Example knowledge survey questions:

In a knowledge survey, students are asked to indicate their level of confidence in answering a question (Nilson 2013). Students will be asked for example:
To follow are a series of questions related to information literacy and research. Language from the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education was used to construct these questions (Association of College and Research Libraries 2016). You do not need to answer the question… you simply need to indicate how confident you would be in answering the question (3) Very confident, (2) Somewhat confident, (1) Not at all confident.
1) Define different types of authority
2) Identify strengths and weaknesses of different types of authority
3) State a specific research question and describe different types of authority for that specific topic/question
4) Determine the credibility of a source and provide information on the elements that might temper this credibility.


References
Association for College and Research Libraries. 2015. Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. Chicago: ACRL.

Nilson, Linda. 2013. Creating Self-Regulated Learners: Strategies to Strengthen Students? Self-Awareness and Learning Skills. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing, LLC.
First-year students
  • Assignment
  • Workshop
Authority is Constructed and Contextual
Human Origins Infographic Assignment
Howells, Michaela
College of Arts and Sciences
Anthropology
Students are tasked with creating an Infographic for Middle School and/or High School Science programs focused on a component of Human Origins. The goals of this assignment were to 1.) assist students in recognizing that the purpose, message, and delivery of information is an intentional act. 2.) develop UNCW student’s technical and communication skills associated with organizing and conveying evolutionary material with a broader audience, 3.) develop a recognition among UNCW students of the importance of making human evolution and evolution education more accessible to for Middle School and/or High School Science students.
Upper-division undergraduates
Assignment
Information Creation as a Process
Braided Essay Machine
Crowe, Melissa
College of Arts and Sciences
Creative Writing
My project is a research/writing assignment to be started in class and completed as homework; the assignment will result in a "braided" or segmented essay--a student-friendly approach to writing creative nonfiction, which relies on discrete segments and makes meaning via accretion and juxtaposition. I've designed this project with several short prompts that will help students quickly hone in on concrete research tasks, each with a varying degree of flexibility regarding subject matter. I've done this in the hope of getting students to experience early on in the semester the ways in which research can galvanize the creative writing process, making that process richer and producing richer work. The project will also necessitate student investigation of various modes of locating data and incorporating that data into their own creative work. This assignment should lay the groundwork for wholly student-identified, research-based projects of their own to be undertaken later in the semester.
Upper-division undergraduates
Assignment
  • Research as Inquiry
  • Searching as Strategic Exploration
  • Scholarship as Conversation
[Syllabus] Information literacy for the CHM350 course curriculum
Lee, Soon Goo
College of Arts and Sciences
Chemistry and Biochemistry
The Introduction to Chemical Research (CHM350) course is designed to introduce chemical investigation to upper-division undergraduates. Through the UNCW's Information Literacy Faculty Fellows workshops, I was able to understand the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. The concepts and knowledge of Information Literacy are included in the CHM350 course syllabus to improve the course curriculum.
Upper-division undergraduates
Syllabus
  • Information Has Value
  • Research as Inquiry
  • Searching as Strategic Exploration
Inquiry into the Global Goals
Elizabeth O Crawford
Watson College of Education
Early Childhood, Elementary, Middle, Literacy and Special Education
The North Carolina Professional Teaching Standards (NCPTS) detail the requisite knowledge, skills, and dispositions of teachers in the 21st century. As such, they guide teacher preparation, including the planned learning experiences and assignments in methods courses.

In LIC 501, students will co-design an integrated curriculum unit for elementary learners aligned with academic content standards and the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Adopted by all UN Member States in 2015, the SDGs outline 17 goals to ensure a sustainable future for all. The interconnected nature of the SDGs, from eliminating hunger and poverty to promoting health and clean energy, reflect the natural linkages between the core content areas of English Language Arts, mathematics, science, and social studies. Students learn about and take action on the SDGs in classrooms throughout the world, thereby empowering children as agents of change in their local communities and beyond.

This assignment serves to build students' content knowledge and information literacy skills by (a) investigating a standards-aligned issue of local and global significance; (b) curating diverse trustworthy, relevant sources of information relative to the curricular focus; and (c) writing a research brief outlining critical content a teacher should know prior to instructional planning.
Graduate students
Assignment
  • Research as Inquiry
  • Searching as Strategic Exploration
Searching for and Finding Women and Religion (PAR 225)
Brummitt, Jamie
College of Arts and Sciences
Philosophy & Religion
This Information Literacy (IL) Project was written for PAR 225: Women and Religion. The project will be implemented in an online version of the class in Fall 2019 and modified for on-campus sections of the class in Spring 2020.

PAR 225 is a religious studies course that examines women’s religious practices and the construction of gender, power, and agency in American history from the 1600s to 2000s.

PAR 225 satisfies the following requirements:

• Satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Living in Our Diverse Nation;
• Partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Historical and Philosophical Approaches;
• Partially satisfies University Studies IV: Building Competencies/Information Literacy;
• Satisfies a Core Course in the Women and Gender Studies Minor;
• Satisfies an Elective Course for PAR majors and minors with an emphasis in Religion.

This IL Project introduces students to primary research, the importance of primary research in the field of women and religion, and how to find, analyze and evaluate primary sources about women and religion. This project is concentrated on reframing the common misconceptions (among historians and students) that women have not been significant actors in American religious history and that women are rarely, if ever, found in primary sources pertaining to American religious history. To these ends, the IL Project contains five components (interspersed with other course readings and assignments) that build over the course of the semester and focus on primary research and primary source evaluation.

Component 1: Searching for Women in American Religious History
Component 2: How to Define, Find, and Cite Women and Religion Sources
Component 3: How Authority is Constructed, Contextual, and Gendered in Primary Sources
Component 4: Finding Women and Religion Archival Reports
Component 5: Evaluating Women and Religion in Primary Sources Final Paper

See the attached document for details about these components and the IL Project.
  • First-year students
  • Upper-division undergraduates
  • Distance learners
  • Assignment
  • Syllabus
  • Teaching plan
  • Course design
  • Authority is Constructed and Contextual
  • Information Creation as a Process
  • Information Has Value
  • Research as Inquiry
  • Searching as Strategic Exploration
Integrating Information Literacy into Quantitative Methods in Public Administration
Kinzer, Kirsten
College of Arts and Sciences
Public and International Affairs
This assignment spans the full semester but is introduced gradually in smaller assignments. In Part One, students pick a data set from six choices, identify a broad research question, and explore relevant variables with descriptive statistics and simple data visualizations. In Part Two, students complete an abbreviated literature review by synthesizing five articles related to their research question. During a subsequent in-class workshop, students refine their initial research questions based on their literature review and begin the process of matching statistical tests to their research question. The final assignment for the semester asks students to fully develop a statistical analysis that responds to their research question and conclude with one or more policy recommendations that builds from their findings.

The assignment has three goals: the first is to help students understand that their research is part of a larger scholarly conversation in that it builds from and adds to existing research. The second goal is to encourage students to apply the statistical tests learned in class to a complex data set, guided by a research question that interest them. The final goal is to prepare students for the basic elements of the capstone project that they will complete at the end of their Master of Public Administration coursework (including identifying a research question, completing a literature review, analyzing data, and proving policy recommendations).
Graduate students
Assignment
Scholarship as Conversation
Information Literacy: Assessing Internet Sites, Blog Postings, and Other Electronic Sources
Seaman, Alana
College of Health and Human Services
Recreation, Sport Leadership, and Tourism
Project includes a lecture aimed at stimulating discussions about how information has value, how value has multiple meanings, and how marketing efforts contribute to the communication and dissemination of information.
Upper-division undergraduates
  • Assignment
  • Other
Lecture & Related Assignment
Information Has Value
Information Literacy: Assessing Internet Sites, Blog Postings, and Other Electronic Sources
Bove, Lisa Anne
College of Health and Human Services
School of Nursing
I want to help students select the best literature (timely, peer reviewed and current) using efficient and complete search techniques and investigate ways to select 'good' internet sites, tweets and blogs. While the expectation is that students cite peer reviewed scholarly articles, they need to understand when and how to use blog posts, social media and other forms of information.
  • Upper-division undergraduates
  • Graduate students
Assignment
  • Authority is Constructed and Contextual
  • Information Has Value
  • Searching as Strategic Exploration
Developing a Research Question / Keyword Search
Rotchford, Ann
College of Arts and Sciences
Sociology & Criminology
IL Goals: Information Creation as a Process, Research as Inquiry
Students are required to write a mini Review of the Literature for this course. This project is done at the beginning of the research process as the students are beginning to think about their topics and before they have begun searching for information.
The purpose of this assignment is to develop a narrow and focused research question. This research question will be used develop the keywords for a data base search.

This is an online course. The collaborative/peer evaluation element of the project serves to build the online learning course community. This project will take the equivalent of two-three class meetings.

Activity: Develop a Research Questions / Searching Terms using Brainstorming Clouds.
Students will develop a research question with one clear independent variable and one clear dependent variable within a specific population. They will use these keywords as the basis for their database searches.
SLO 1: Students will use brainstorming clouds to gain practice identifying the main ideas (keywords) of a research question.
SLO 2: Depending on their area of interest, students will access and use a specialized databases: Sociological Abstracts or Criminal Justice Abstracts.
SLO 3: Students will participate in knowledge generation by creating their own grading rubric for this project. They will use this grading rubric to evaluate their peers’ submission.


Project Plan Part 1: Developing the Research Question and Initial Search for Sources
1. Students will watch an information video on developing a focused research question from their area of interest. The research question will identify an independent and dependent variable and a particular population of interest. The video will also demonstrate how the independent, dependent variables and the population form three main ideas. I will explain that these main ideas are called “keywords.” These keywords will be the center of each brainstorming cloud. I will demonstrate how to brainstorm words related to each of the three keywords.
2. Students will watch an informational Information Literacy (IL) video on key word searches developed by a UNCW Librarian. The video will use the same research question that I used in the video described above. The IL video will demonstrate the results of keyword searches. The the Librarian will show how the results change by various search techniques (phrasing, date restrictions, periodical type, etc).
3. Students are put into peer groups of about five.
4. Each group is asked to determine the three most important elements of the process of building the research question and developing a brainstorming strategy.
5. I will compile these elements and advise students that this is the rubric for the assignment below.

Project Plan Part 2: Research Question and Critical Reflection
1. Students develop the research question that they will be using throughout the semester. They will develop their brainstorming maps using the keywords from their research question.
2. Students will record the number of results generated with each change in search strategy demonstrated in the video by the Librarian.
3. Reflection: Why have we done this? Why would this be helpful for searching? How does this help structure the Literature Review?
4. Students will compile the focused research question, brainstorming cloud, and six retrieved sources.
5. Students will evaluate peer submissions based on their grading rubric.
6. I will also evaluate submissions based on the class grading rubric. I will also evaluate the peer reviews. I will focus on how well the students applied the grading rubric to their peer evaluation.
Upper-division undergraduates
Assignment
  • Information Creation as a Process
  • Research as Inquiry
Incorporating Information Literacy Frames in Document Design
Ray,Anirban
College of Arts and Sciences
English
The project is based on ENG 319 Document Design course in which students researched and developed interruption maps for the administrative assistants from three CAS departments. The purpose of the maps was to identify and understand interruptions in task flows of these users. The students interviewed administrative assistants from the departments of Communication Studies, Sociology and Criminology, and Psychology and studied individual event-logs of interruptions, which were recorded by the users, to create these maps. The students further developed prototypes of interruption visualizations and conducted usability studies with the users before creating the final version of the maps.
  • Faculty
  • Other
Administrative Assistants
Assignment
  • Information Creation as a Process
  • Information Has Value
  • Searching as Strategic Exploration
Archive.zip
Searching as Strategic Exploration: Searching for Sources in SOC/CRM300 Research Methods Class: Assignment
Jill Waity
College of Arts and Sciences
Sociology & Criminology
This project incorporates the frame: Searching as Strategic Exploration

Students in research methods courses often struggle with locating appropriate sources for a research proposal. This assignment incorporates the Information Literacy frame “Searching as Strategic Exploration” to help students overcome this difficulty.

This assignment requires two class periods to complete, both with assistance from your liaison librarian.

On Day 1, a general overview of search strategies for your specific subject (in this case, sociology and criminology) is given by the librarian. Then, students are split up into groups and have to find specific sources as part of a scavenger hunt. It is important that they document the process of how they found each source (did they use a sociology database, google scholar, etc.).

This could be adapted depending on the course. In this case, I will give students a specific topic in sociology that is relatively narrow.

First, they have to search the topic on three different databases, and describe the different results that they got.

They will have to find a source that is peer reviewed and in a sociology journal. They will indicate how they know it is peer reviewed and how they know it is in a sociology journal.

Then they have to use that article to find another article related to the topic.

Then they have to find an article written in a certain date range, later than 2010 for example.

After they feel comfortable searching for articles, it is time for the next step.

Before the class period begins, I will have chosen 6-8 articles related to the topic. Each group will get the abstracts of the articles. They will then complete the following:
Are all of the articles relevant to the topic? (Include one that is only tangentially related)
Are all of them peer reviewed and in a sociology journal?
Of the ones that are remaining, organize them by theme based on the abstract (this will depend on the topic that is chosen).


On Day 2, now that students are very familiar with searching as strategic exploration, students will repeat most of the assignment using their own topic that they are using for their research proposal. You can do this however you want to, but I plan to have assigned students to one of four topics before this class period.

Using the database they found to be the best on day 1, they search their topic and come up with a list of 20 articles. They may need to change how they phrase their topic and the words they use. The librarian can assist them with this.

Then they make sure those articles are peer reviewed, in a sociology journal, and are current. Those that aren’t will be eliminated from the list.

Then, they will read through the abstracts and eliminate any articles that are only tangentially related to the topic.

Finally, they will read through all of the remaining abstracts, and organize the articles by theme.

Depending on how much time is left at the end of class, they can begin to fill out the information about the articles they have found in a literature table.
Upper-division undergraduates
Assignment
Searching as Strategic Exploration
Spatialized Annotated Bibliography
Hallenbeck, Sarah
College of Arts and Sciences
English
This project is intended for English 201 students, who complete a research project that often begins with an annotated bibliography. This annotated bibliography is "spatialized" in the sense that it requires students to position their sources relative to one another in a Prezi or other presentation software. Scholarly sources available through databases are "deeper" or lower on the page than popular sources; sources that are frequently cited are larger than other sources, and sources that are "in conversation" with one another are close to each other.
  • First-year students
  • Upper-division undergraduates
  • Faculty
  • Assignment
  • Workshop
  • Authority is Constructed and Contextual
  • Information Has Value
  • Research as Inquiry
Formal Introduction to Information Literacy for MSN NE Students
April Matthias
College of Health and Human Services
School of Nursing
Information literacy (IL) is an expectation for graduate nursing students; however, the practice of IL is unfortunately adopted through "learn as you go" and "trial and error" approaches. I plan to formally introduce IL as a tangible skill for the MSN NE student through the development of seven short video presentations - one to introduce IL and one for each frame. The MSN NE courses are 7 weeks in length so I will include one presentation in each weekly module over the duration of NSG 596 Nursing Education Practicum I. I will develop a short questionnaire to assess the students' knowledge of IL before and after viewing the 7 video presentations. It is my hope that after viewing the video presentations, the students will gain a better understanding and appreciation for IL. I also hope that the presentations will provide the students a broader context to support the practices we ask of them for their school work and what will be expected of them in their scholarship throughout their professional career. I will begin developing the 7 videos in fall 2018 and plan to implement them in Spring/Summer 2018. I plan to analyze the questionnaire results for effectiveness of the video presentations.
Graduate students
Teaching plan
  • Authority is Constructed and Contextual
  • Information Creation as a Process
  • Information Has Value
  • Research as Inquiry
  • Searching as Strategic Exploration
  • Scholarship as Conversation
Information Literacy Changes to GGY/GLY 495
Halls, Joanne
College of Arts and Sciences
Earth and Ocean Sciences
I revamped the syllabus for GGY/GLY 495 to build upon two Information Literacy frames: Research as Enquiry and Searching as Strategic Exploration. The main goals for this course (senior seminar) is for the students to develop a research question, read pertinent peer-reviewed literature, and develop and give a final presentation. I have substantially increased the IL content by further developing the iterative process of formulating a research question and then how to conduct peer-reviewed research to address a specific question.
Upper-division undergraduates
  • Syllabus
  • Course design
  • Research as Inquiry
  • Searching as Strategic Exploration
Information Literacy Activities for Research Methods class
Chen-Edinboro, Lenis
College of Health and Human Services
Public Health
For my Information Literacy Framework “project,” I plan to implement in my PBH 359 Research Methods in Public Health class a number of small activities that relate to several of the information literacy frames that were presented.
Upper-division undergraduates
Other
Series of class activities
  • Authority is Constructed and Contextual
  • Information Creation as a Process
  • Information Has Value
  • Research as Inquiry
  • Searching as Strategic Exploration
  • Scholarship as Conversation
Information Literacy Workbook for MUS 351
Helena Spencer
College of Arts and Sciences
Music
This project introduces the language of the IL frames to students, then uses these frames to complete several assignments over the course of the semester: an annotated bibliography (including preliminary and revised versions), program notes, a literature review, and a research proposal. Several reflections and several smaller "scaffolding" tasks are included.
Upper-division undergraduates
  • Assignment
  • Teaching plan
  • Course design
  • Authority is Constructed and Contextual
  • Information Creation as a Process
  • Information Has Value
  • Research as Inquiry
  • Searching as Strategic Exploration
  • Scholarship as Conversation
Analysis of Scholarly Venue
Cummings, Lance
College of Arts and Sciences
English
This assignment has been used in both undergraduate and graduate classes to prepare students for writing disciplinary-specific research articles. I've mostly used this assignment for science writers, but it can be adapted to any field. The goal is to further student understanding of how scholarly knowledge is constructed and how specific contexts influences writing and style by analyzing a specific scholarly venue. In short, students analyze the "knowledge community" around a specific scholarly venue or journal by looking at the submission guidelines, the most popular or cited articles, and specific representative articles.

Students learn that authority is constructed, because who is authoritative and how that is displayed will be different across venues. Students learn that information creation is a process, because they look closely at the submission process and guidelines. And students learn that information has value, because they see what it takes to produce scholarly knowledge and the costs involved.

The assignment sheet is attached to this entry, but it is important to scaffold this assignment. Students should first learn the relevant information literacy principles, as well as any disciplinary principles that might apply. In my science writing classes, we use ideas from rhetoric and writing. Secondly, it is important to perform an example analysis with the whole class. I usually find a related journal and have students compose an analysis on a single collaborative doc in groups. We then revise this example as a whole class. Students see the process of writing the analysis and have an example to think about.

This assignment is also most effective when you give students time to peer review each other's drafts. Doing so improves their projects, but also allows them to see how contexts might be different across other venues.
  • First-year students
  • Upper-division undergraduates
  • Graduate students
  • Distance learners
Assignment
  • Authority is Constructed and Contextual
  • Information Creation as a Process
  • Information Has Value
Political Science and Information Literacy
King, Aaron
College of Arts and Sciences
Public and International Affairs
In this brief report, I unpack each of the 6 frames in the ACRL's Framework for Information Literacy and offer my own interpretation of how they relate to political science. This report is useful for students and faculty within the discipline in order to underscore the importance of information literacy specific to the scientific study of political phenomena.
  • First-year students
  • Upper-division undergraduates
  • Faculty
  • Assignment
  • Other
Resource for students and faculty in political science
  • Authority is Constructed and Contextual
  • Information Creation as a Process
  • Information Has Value
  • Research as Inquiry
  • Searching as Strategic Exploration
  • Scholarship as Conversation
Beginning the Journey: The Process of Creating an Academic Research Question
Taper, Colin
Other
University College
(Note: Assignments and rubrics to come later)
Context
• For UNI-101 students
• Addresses UNI-101 Goal #1: Demonstrate the ability to identify, locate and use reference sources and materials necessary for success in a higher education experience
• Specifically addresses the following SLO associated in this goal: Use library resources to answer a research question
• The objectives for the project are the following:
• To differentiate between a well-constructed academic research question and an academic research question that is no well-constructed
• To demonstrate the process by which a well-constructed academic research question is created
Order of Events
1. Students will watch three videos of UNCW professors, each from a different college, describe their process of generating a research question
a. While viewing, students are tasked with identify two steps of the process described in each video, as well as one characteristic of the process as described by each professor
2. After reviewing their findings, the instructor then identifies for students the common characteristics and the steps of the research question creation process.
3. Students will then take a low-stakes/no-stakes formative assessment on the characteristics and steps of the research question creation process.
a. Feedback on low-stakes/no-stakes formative assessment is provided by both peers and instructor
4. Next, based on previous experience and knowledge, students are asked to state the qualities of a well-constructed research question.
5. Instructor then defines these qualities via an examination of both well-constructed and poorly-constructed research questions, with a specific focus on the presence or absence of the aforementioned qualities.
a. Students will reflect on the differences, if any, between their assumptions regarding a well-constructed academic research question and what they have learned.
6. Students are then asked to identify the qualities in new-to-them, well-constructed research questions.
a. This will be completed individually first, then as a member of a small group.
b. Feedback on this no-stakes formative assessment is provided by both peers and instructor.
7. Following the feedback, students will take a low-stakes formative/summative assessment for which they will identify research questions as either well-constructed or not well-constructed.
8. Finally, students will begin the process of creating a research question.
a. A job aid (in this case, a checklist) will be provided for students.
First-year students
  • Assignment
  • Teaching plan
  • Rubric
Research as Inquiry
Information Literacy Assignment for UNI 101 (fall 2018)
McGuire, Beverley
College of Arts and Sciences
Philosophy & Religion
Instructions:
First, develop a research question tied to yoga, meditation, or another contemplative practice. Find an issue that interests you, explore it, ask questions about it, and refine it into a question that will guide your research. It shouldn’t be a yes/no question, but instead one that might have many answers, which will require you to defend whatever position you take on the issue.

Once you have identified your research question, identify sources that may help you address your question. Select at least one source from each of the following, which you will discuss in this assignment.
- An article on Wikipedia (www.wikipedia.com)
- A video on Youtube (www.youtube.com)
- A peer-reviewed article on JSTOR (http://www.jstor.org.liblink.uncw.edu/action/showAdvancedSearch?acc=on&wc=on )
- A newspaper or magazine article
- A website

Write a bibliography that cites each source according to Chicago Manual of Style or MLA formats. Here you’ll find resources on both citation styles:
Chicago: http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide/citation-guide-1.html
MLA: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/12/

Then, for each source, address the following questions:
• What type of authority does the author/creator have? How has this authority been conferred to the author/creator?
• How credible is the source? What evidence might you point to that the source is credible?
• What process was involved in creating this source (as far as you can tell)?
• For what purpose might you consider using this source of information?
• What are the opportunities and constraints of the source?

Further Resources
Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education: http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/ilframework
Arthurs et al., “Researching Youtube” http://journals.sagepub.com.liblink.uncw.edu/doi/full/10.1177/1354856517737222
James P. Purdy, “Wikipedia is Good for You!?” http://writingspaces.org/sites/default/files/purdy--wikipedia-is-good-for-you.pdf
First-year students
Assignment
  • Authority is Constructed and Contextual
  • Information Creation as a Process