A blog from Special Collections and University Archives


Posted: May 28, 2014

 

Lauren Love is an intern working in Special Collections.


While reformatting the finding aid for the collection of St. Andrews Covenant Presbyterian Church (also known as MS 180) an excellent piece of Wilmington art history was spotted. The small booklet from 1943 was created for “An Artistic Banquet” held at the Church of the Covenant just before it was merged with St. Andrews in 1944.

Twenty Fifth Anniversary Celebration booklet published 1943

                                                    The Church of the Covenant

Before I continue, allow me to introduce myself: my name is Lauren Love and this summer I am interning in the Special Collections department of UNCW Randall Library. So far I have been buried, nose first, in MS 180 only briefly coming up for air to help move furniture and prepare for spring cleaning project which has taken over our domain (more on that in the future!).

Front cover of An Artistic BanquetBack page of An Artistic Banquet pamphlet

Initially I was struck by the hand painted illustration on the cover of the booklet whose colors contrasted so sharply with the stale yellow of ageing paper. To satisfy my curiosity, I brought the find to my supervisor, Rebecca Baugnon. “Claude Howell!” she said excitedly after flipping through to the last page; “Claude Howell?!” came the voice of Jerry Parnell, the Special Collections Coordinator from across the hall. One can imagine how my interest peeked at such reactions. Upon further inspection we found that the pamphlet was an itinerary of sorts for an educational art program where lessons in painting, watercolor, drawing and much more were offered to attendees. The investigation became an eye opening revelation about the history of Art culture in Wilmington and how, unbeknownst to me, I held in my hands a small booklet which contained the names of some local art heroes.

                   Irene Price 1930s, photograph from Two Centuries of Art in New Hanover County
                                                                  
by Crockette W. Hewlett

Unassumingly printed are the names of Peggy Hall, Claude Howell, Rosalie Oliver and Winona Gration. The details of how these artists contributed to the booklet is unknown but further research proved that they were students together under Irene Price and Delbert Palmer. Price was a friend of Elisabeth Augusta Chant who is partially responsible for encouraging and cultivating the art scene in Wilmington. Chant and Price both taught art classes in downtown Wilmington during the 1930s and went on to found and direct various programs and institutions while maintaining connections with some of the artists listed above. Simple though it may appear, the booklet shows the efforts of these budding artists to work with the community to foster a love of arts which we still see in our port city today.

Peggy Hall and students Claude Howell

                                                Peggy Hall with students 1941 (left), and Claude Howell (right)
                               Photographs from Two Centuries of Art in New Hanover County by Crockette W. Hewlett

Peggy Hall studied under Price and Chant and went on to become the director of the Wilmington Museum of Art, a museum which opened in 1940 and before World War II came to a close. She exhibited her work around the country and possessed a passion for art throughout her life.

Claude Howell would become a very influential artist who taught at UNCW and played a large role in the establishment of the Art Department. Some of his paintings are located on the first floor of the library near Port City Java and a beautiful collection of illustrated holiday cards are housed in the Special Collections Library upstairs.

Rosalie Oliver taught and spoke at the Wilmington Museum of Art.

Unfortunately I could not find any information on Winona Gration.


For more information come ask us about the following collections:
MS 063 – A Balkan Sketchbook by Claude Howell
MS 076 – Claude Howell – Classification of Art Prints
MS 326 – Claude Howell Christmas Cards

For a truly enlightening exploration of art in Wilmington read Two Centuries of Art in New Hanover County by Crockette W. Hewlett, both the pictures used in this blog post as well as the biographical information are from this thorough and entertaining book. 

Sources can be accessed by visiting Randall Library and the Special Collections Library therein:

  • An Artistic Banquet. Wilmington:  Church of the Covenant, 1943. Print. Box 10, Folder 3. St. Andrews Covenant Presbyterian Church Collection. Randall Library Special Collections, University of North Carolina Wilmington, Wilmington, NC. May 21, 2014.
  • Hewlett, Crockette W.. Two Centuries of Art in New Hanover County. Durham: Moore Publishing Company, 1976. Print.
  • Twenty Fifth Anniversary Celebration. Wilmington: Church of the Covenant, 1943. Print. Box 10, Folder 3. St. Andrews Covenant Presbyterian Church Collection. Randall Library Special Collections, University of North Carolina Wilmington, Wilmington, NC. May 21, 2014. 

 

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Posted: May 06, 2014

University Archives student assistant cleans stone replica from collection. Photo by University Archives / UNCWUniversity Archives student assistant cleans item from collection. Photo by University Archives / UNCW.

April 27-May 3, 2014 was American Library Association Preservation Week and May is Preservation Month with loads of great information from the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

Preservation--also known as “preventive conservation”--emphasizes noninterventive actions to prevent damage to and minimize deterioration of a museum object or archival collection.

For example:

  • Monitoring and recording environmental conditions where collections are housed (e.g., light, relative humidity, temperature, and air pollution)
  • Inspecting and recording the condition of objects
  • Practicing proper handling, storage, exhibit, housekeeping, and packing and shipping techniques

Taj Mahal model in University Archives. These replicas are made in various sizes.  The one in Archives has a base of 9 in. by 9 in.

Taj Mahal model in University Archives. These models are made in various sizes.  This one in Archives has a base of 9 in. by 9 in.

In University Archives, we rely on our excellent student assistants to take on essential preservation and collection care responsibilities.

Allison Thompson, Archives student assistant, wore cotton gloves while carefully cleaning the soapstone model. First she dry-brushed the item with a fine brush from a collection care kit and then cleaned it with plain water using a similar brush.

For storage, she fabricated custom archival boxes and lids from ArtCareTM 100 percent cotton mat board. Boxes made of this material help create a safe “microchamber” for archival and museum objects.

 

Protective boxes in University Archives for storage of objects.

 

This Taj Mahal mini-replica was a gift to former James Leutze upon his retirement in 2003. He donated it to University Archives at that time. Chancellor Leutze, a historian, was host of the UNC Television series Globewatch and an often-sought speaker on international issues.

Chancellor James Leutze (2007). Photo by UNCW University Relations.
Chancellor James R. Leutze (2007). Photo by UNCW University Relations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reference

Knapp, A. M. (1993, July). Preservation of museum collections. Conserv O Gram, 1(1), 1-2. Retrieved from http://www.cr.nps.gov/museum/publications/conserveogram/01-01.pdf.   

 

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Posted: March 21, 2014

On the ladder, in the stacks of the Gillen Collection

Randall Library won a grant award from the U.S. National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) allowing Special Collections and University Archives to bring a preservation specialist to UNCW to assess these unique collections. The Preservation Assistance Grant (PAG) for Smaller Institutions paid for Matthew S. ("Matt") Johnson of Etherington Conservation Services (ECS) to spend March 17-21 in Special Collections and University Archives for the survey. Next Mr. Johnson will produce a written report of his findings and recommendations for improving collection care.

Mr. Johnson, Senior Rare Book Conservator at ECS in Browns Summit, NC, has been with the company since 1993. He is a 1991 graduate of UNC-Greensboro, where he earned a BFA degree in Design and Printmaking. He trained directly under renowned conservator Don Etherington. Mr. Johnson's responsibilities include staff training, project management, and advanced conservation.

National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) logo

 

 

The NEH PAG for Smaller Institutions helps small and mid-sized institutions—such as libraries, museums, historical societies, archival repositories, cultural organizations, town and county records offices, and colleges and universities—improve their ability to preserve and care for their significant humanities collections. These may include special collections of books and journals, archives and manuscripts, prints and photographs, moving images, sound recordings, or architectural plans and maps. UNCW was awarded $6,000 in January 2014 to fund the preservation assessment.
 

Assessing map case CONTENTS in UNIVERSITY Archives (click on thumbnail)

Matt Johnson assesses map case contents in University Archives.

 

 
 
TAKING LIGHT METER READINGS (click on thumbnail)

Matt Johnson takes light meter readings in Special Collections.

 
 
 
 
Adina Riggins, Rebecca Baugnon, Jerry Parnell FROM UNCW AnD Matt Johnson, NEH Preservation Assistance Grant CONTRACTOR (CLICK on ThumbNail)

University Archives and Special Collection staff pose with NEH PAG contractor..

 

 

 

 

INSPECTING BOOKS (click on thumbnail)

 

 

 

 

SHINING A LIGHT ON PRESERVATION  (click on thumbnail)

Shining a Light on Preservation

 

 

 

 

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Posted: February 17, 2014

 

Please join us for a poetry reading from, Collected Poems, with Mike Papadeas on Friday, February 21 at 5:00 p.m. in Special Collections. 

 

                   

 

This recently published book of poetry highlights Papadeas' experience as a Greek immigrant, his career and various important events during his life. Born in Athens, Greece, Papadeas has lived in both Burlington and Kure Beach, North Carolina for the past 40 years. He is a graduate of Auburn University and worked as an electrical engineer with Lucent Technologies for 35 years. In addition to Collected Poems, Papadeas is also the author of a memoir, Coming to America: A Memoir, 1938-1958, published in 2013. Both books are available to view in Special Collections. 

 

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Posted: February 04, 2014

 

On display in Special Collections from January 15 to May 15 is an exhibit titled, Observing Africa: The Life and Career of Stuart Marks. 

 

Stuart Marks is a biologist and anthropologist whose work has focused on wildlife management, conservation and human development in Africa. Marks was born in Wilmington, North Carolina in 1939 and spent most of his youth living in the Belgian Congo at the American Presbyterian Congo Mission station, Lubondai. After completing his undergraduate degree in Zoology from North Carolina State University, Marks earned a Masters in Wildlife and Quantitative Methods and a Ph.D. in Ecology and Anthropology from Michigan State University. Marks' dissertational work in Zambia with the Valley Bisa culture has been the basis for much of his personal and professional research. His distinguished career includes work as a professor, scholar, independent researcher and consultant in the United States and Africa. He has received numerous honors and has been the recipient of research grants from institutions such as the H.F. Guggenheim Foundation, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Geographic Society and the Ford Foundation Foreign Area Fellowship program. Marks has authored eight books, written chapters for nineteen publications, published eighty-two articles in professional journals and acted as consultant to fourteen major studies. 

 

        

 

Drawing from items held in the Stuart Alexander and Sandy Cole Marks manuscript collection archived in Randall Library Special Collections, this exhibit highlights Marks' life from childhood to present day, spanning numerous countries and careers. Items on display include artifacts, books, correspondence, elephant tusks, field notes, mammalian crania, maps, newspaper articles, photographs, postcards and stamps.

 

 

 

Also take a peak at the newly created Stuart Marks digital collection, documenting numerous photographs digitized from the manuscript collection. 

 

Special Collections in located on the second floor of Randall Library. We are open Monday through Thursday 9-5 and Friday 9-12.

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Posted: November 29, 2013

In 1973, the book collection of the William M. Randall Library of the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) reached 100,000 volumes. To celebrate, the library acquired a first edition Huck Finn by Mark Twain (published in 1885) and held a special ceremony. This first edition is in Special Collections.

An announcement for the Nov. 30 ceremony was in the Seahawk student newspaper.

For comparison, according to 2012/2013 statistics, Randall Library has 481,134 books

A couple notes from the library's history:

*Wilmington College Library moved from a few rooms in Alderman Hall to its own building during winter break of 1968. It opened in January of 1969 and the official dedication was March 30.

*Randall Libray began planning an expansion in 1985, which was completed in 1987. 

 

 

This model of Randall Library, circa 1985, is in University Archives in Randall Library at UNCW.
Randall Library Model 1985

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted: November 19, 2013

Seahawk student newspaper 1960John F. Kennedy was elected President of the United States on November 8, 1960. According to an editorial in the Wilmington College student newspaper, JFK came to office with the burden that the people “will expect much, will demand much, and, conceivably, will receive much.”

1963 student newspaperJust three years later, on November 22, 1963, President Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, TX to the shock and horror of the American people. The reaction of one Wilmington College student, Jack Loftus, was captured nearly one month later in the December 18, 1963 issue of the Seahawk. Loftus wrote that the assassination reflected the “barbarism” and “extremism” that had become part of America. He claimed that these attitudes had allowed “some punk with a mail-order rifle [to murder] the President of the United States.”

Theories

Long after Wilmington College became the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW), debates about the nature of the assassination continued. In 1993, UNCW offered a course on the Rhetoric of JFK Assassination Theories.

1993 Seahawk student newspaper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reflections

Virginia Adams, dean of the UNCW School of Nursing from 1994-2008, was a college student when President Kennedy was assassinated. In the interview transcript of her oral history, she spoke of Kennedy's legacy:

Virginia Adams, Ph.D. Photo by UNCW Office of University Relations in 2006Virginia Adams, Ph.D. Former Dean of the School of Nursing. Photo by UNCW Office of University Relations in 2006.

When I was a freshman student, Kennedy was killed .... That had a big impact on us, on my campus, on the students. I mean everybody literally stopped. We believed in this President, and we believed that changes were going to occur because of this President. It was a shock. And it was hurtful. It was painful... the students were mobilizing at that time. So we were a part of the change in the world. Isn't that something to say? “We were a part of the change in the world.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted: November 14, 2013

Lou Buttino. Photo by UNCW Office of University Relations, 2007Lou Buttino. Photo by UNCW/Office of University Relations.

Back in 2005, the documentary Broken Brotherhood: Vietnam and the Boys from Colgate made its North Carolina debut on Veterans Day in Kenan Auditorium at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. The autobiographical film by UNCW professor and filmmaker Lou Buttino addresses division and the potential for healing after the Vietnam War.

It is screening again on Thursday, November 14, 2013, at 7 pm in the UNCW Lumina Theatre, followed by a panel discussion. This event is part of The Big Read Greater Wilmington-2013.

Buttino is a documentary filmmaker and film studies professor. He has taught at UNCW for 19 years.

Broken Brotherhood recounts the path toward reconciliation between Buttino--who had been a conscientious objector during Vietnam--and his college friend, Brian O'Donnell--who became a Vietnam veteran. The two had not spoken for 35 years. The film also explores what happened to other Colgate University students during and after the Vietnam era.

In 2005, Buttino told the Seahawk:

"The idea of making this documentary came to me when I realized I had never made peace with that era," Buttino said. "I felt very wounded to see what happened to my friends, even my best friend/roommate from college [Brian O’Donnell]. Part of the reason I wanted to make this film was so that I could travel across country and talk to him 35 years later and see if we could salvage our friendship. It's a very powerful and emotional film that resonates to today."

“Films can entertain, provoke and inspire. This one is about healing. Healing can help bring wisdom. I hope we will find wisdom regarding the Vietnam War and release from the divisiveness that it inspired. Wisdom is one of the things we never got from the Vietnam War,” Buttino said.

The Seahawk, November 3, 2005--p 4Seahawk student newspaper: "New department chair sees a bright future for film."

 

The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien

UNCW Randall Library partners with The Big Read--Greater Wilmington in 2013.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Big Read Logo

*The Big Read is a program of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with Arts Midwest

 

 

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Posted: November 04, 2013

The Seahawk, November 3, 195855 years ago, the Seahawk released its first monthly issue, becoming Wilmington College's monthly student newspaper after a period of sporadic publication. The news organization promised to striveThe Seahawk, November 3, 1958--p 2 for this level of consistency in the future.

The first Seahawk newspaper was distributed in September 1948. The year 1958 was its reinvigoration, according to the 1959 Fledgling yearbook. A Publications Board, consisting of representatives from the administration, faculty, and student body, was established to support the Seahawk.

The Seahawk remains the student news organization for the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) to this day. Online news services are provided continually and a print newspaper is published every other week. The Seahawk was never a daily newspaper, although publication did rech twice a week at various times.

The Fledgling, 1959

 

The Seahawk, November 3, 1958--View first monthly issue

Digital Seahawk Collection, 1948-1973

How to Search the Seahawk

The Power of Print and Pixels: 65 Years of UNCW Student News - Exhibit in Special Collections Open Until Dec. 3

 

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Posted: October 29, 2013
The Seahawk, October 18, 1978Thirty-five years ago, in October of 1978, the English Club at the University of North Carolina Wilmington sold raffle tickets for $.50 each—which would be less than $2 today, according to the US Department of Labor. The raffle tickets could be purchased from club members or from the secretary of the English Department between the 11th and the 26th of October. The prize to be given to the winner of the raffle was a keg of beer, which the club called “Witches Brew.” Betty Salyer and Bobbi Padgett, two UNCW students and English Club members, were said to have travelled to the place where “witches, goblins, skeletons, and evil spirits” meet to concoct their evil brew. The Seahawk writer assured their readers that all the “members of the English Cub must warn prospective winners of the evil spell that accompanie[d] this ‘evil Fluid.’” The winner was chosen on October 27, 1978.
 
The Seahawk, October 11, 1978
 
 
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